LTH Home

black market pecorino

black market pecorino
  • Forum HomePost Reply BackTop
     Page 1 of 2
  • black market pecorino

    Post #1 - October 15th, 2016, 8:43 pm
    Post #1 - October 15th, 2016, 8:43 pm Post #1 - October 15th, 2016, 8:43 pm
    It will change the way you think about pecorino romano; Steven Jenkins brought us a chunk of his new proprietary cheese and it is phenomenal: quiet, then buttery, then lactic, then herbaceous, a long sloppy kiss of a cheese, then reeling back, realizing what it has done, apologizes with a finish of gratitude.
    Being gauche rocks, stun the bourgeoisie
  • Post #2 - October 15th, 2016, 10:16 pm
  • Post #3 - October 16th, 2016, 12:08 pm
    Post #3 - October 16th, 2016, 12:08 pm Post #3 - October 16th, 2016, 12:08 pm
    "'Pretentious' -- moi ?"
    fine words butter no parsnips
  • Post #4 - October 18th, 2016, 11:51 am
    Post #4 - October 18th, 2016, 11:51 am Post #4 - October 18th, 2016, 11:51 am
    What exactly is pretentious about sharing the appearance of a great new cheese?

    Jenkins = http://newyork.seriouseats.com/2008/07/ ... nkins.html

    I'm the cheese specialist for a new store in Greenwich Village. Working in NYC with great, knowledgable staff offers me opportunities I wouldn't have, say, in Indianapolis.

    Opportunities like attending the World's Best Cheese trade show not that long ago.
    Being gauche rocks, stun the bourgeoisie
  • Post #5 - October 18th, 2016, 1:58 pm
    Post #5 - October 18th, 2016, 1:58 pm Post #5 - October 18th, 2016, 1:58 pm
    Christopher Gordon wrote:It will change the way you think about pecorino romano; Steven Jenkins brought us a chunk of his new proprietary cheese and it is phenomenal: quiet, then buttery, then lactic, then herbaceous, a long sloppy kiss of a cheese, then reeling back, realizing what it has done, apologizes with a finish of gratitude.


    I look forward to your posts and much appreciate your flair for language. I'd argue that the height of pretension is posting silly takedowns of others' efforts to share info on a chat site.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #6 - October 18th, 2016, 3:10 pm
    Post #6 - October 18th, 2016, 3:10 pm Post #6 - October 18th, 2016, 3:10 pm
    boudreaulicious wrote:I'd argue that the height of pretension is posting silly takedowns of others' efforts to share info on a chat site.

    I don't know if it's pretension but it's certainly tiresome, especially when it predictably originates from the same place over and over again.

    =R=
    for the Moderators
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #7 - October 18th, 2016, 7:05 pm
    Post #7 - October 18th, 2016, 7:05 pm Post #7 - October 18th, 2016, 7:05 pm
    I like pecorino. Thanks for sharing.

    Maybe we can resume talking about cheese now?
  • Post #8 - October 19th, 2016, 6:17 pm
    Post #8 - October 19th, 2016, 6:17 pm Post #8 - October 19th, 2016, 6:17 pm
    The pecorinos I am familiar with(and Locatelli, I'm looking at you) are condiment cheeses, grating cheeses, aggressive, salty, behemoths in the ancient pantheon of cheese. This new pecorino is a wonder(and I cannot wait until I can legitimately-sell it, not just curl off tastes to curious aficionados). My GM chides me that our chunk should last until Christmas, then directs me to offer bits to our VIP's.
    Being gauche rocks, stun the bourgeoisie
  • Post #9 - October 19th, 2016, 6:26 pm
    Post #9 - October 19th, 2016, 6:26 pm Post #9 - October 19th, 2016, 6:26 pm
    Christopher Gordon wrote:The pecorinos I am familiar with(and Locatelli, I'm looking at you) are condiment cheeses, grating cheeses, aggressive, salty, behemoths in the ancient pantheon of cheese. This new pecorino is a wonder(and I cannot wait until I can legitimately-sell it, not just curl off tastes to curious aficionados). My GM chides me that our chunk should last until Christmas, then directs me to offer bits to our VIP's.


    Hi,

    Do you think the producer is mistaken to refer to this as pecorino when you suggest it is in a class of its own?

    Regards,
    CAthy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #10 - October 20th, 2016, 4:24 pm
    Post #10 - October 20th, 2016, 4:24 pm Post #10 - October 20th, 2016, 4:24 pm
    Roger Ramjet wrote:
    Christopher Gordon wrote:quiet, then buttery, then lactic, then herbaceous, a long sloppy kiss of a cheese, then reeling back, realizing what it has done, apologizes with a finish of gratitude.


    No.

    I'm sorry, but no.

    It is simply not humanly possible to read those words and think, "That's not pretentious, it's simply sharing information."

    And as for you, Mr Ronnie "Tiresome" Suburban, where the fuck were you when people were posting deranged nonsense such as "not charging for bread is nazism"???


    It's Christopher Gordon's normal writing style, and I didn't read it as pretentious. That might be because I've been hanging around a bunch of professional beer brewers lately, and they speak the same way about beer. They're pretty humble, down to earth people, but very serious - even scientific - about beer and creating a balanced finished product. Constant and fanatical attention to the different tastes and flavor compounds that are produced throughout the brewing process is necessary for them to create a great beer - and they do make great beer. I actually have learned from them how to taste and notice the more subtle characteristics of beer, and it's helped me appreciate it more. It's a really cool skill that can be transferred to wine, cheese, or any other food.

    I assume Christopher Gordon - as a cheese monger - has the same mentality as these beer guys, he seems to take his product just as seriously.
    Logan: Come on, everybody, wang chung tonight! What? Everybody, wang chung tonight! Wang chung, or I'll kick your ass!
  • Post #11 - October 20th, 2016, 4:42 pm
    Post #11 - October 20th, 2016, 4:42 pm Post #11 - October 20th, 2016, 4:42 pm
    I'm just disgruntled I can't try this cheese. Christopher, please let us know when/if the ship comes in. And thanks for the evocative review.
  • Post #12 - October 21st, 2016, 3:51 pm
    Post #12 - October 21st, 2016, 3:51 pm Post #12 - October 21st, 2016, 3:51 pm
    bnowell724 wrote:
    Roger Ramjet wrote:
    Christopher Gordon wrote:quiet, then buttery, then lactic, then herbaceous, a long sloppy kiss of a cheese, then reeling back, realizing what it has done, apologizes with a finish of gratitude.


    No.

    I'm sorry, but no.

    It is simply not humanly possible to read those words and think, "That's not pretentious, it's simply sharing information."

    And as for you, Mr Ronnie "Tiresome" Suburban, where the fuck were you when people were posting deranged nonsense such as "not charging for bread is nazism"???


    It's Christopher Gordon's normal writing style, and I didn't read it as pretentious. That might be because I've been hanging around a bunch of professional beer brewers lately, and they speak the same way about beer. They're pretty humble, down to earth people, but very serious - even scientific - about beer and creating a balanced finished product. Constant and fanatical attention to the different tastes and flavor compounds that are produced throughout the brewing process is necessary for them to create a great beer - and they do make great beer. I actually have learned from them how to taste and notice the more subtle characteristics of beer, and it's helped me appreciate it more. It's a really cool skill that can be transferred to wine, cheese, or any other food.

    I assume Christopher Gordon - as a cheese monger - has the same mentality as these beer guys, he seems to take his product just as seriously.


    Not to add fuel to the fire, but there's a difference between a bunch of professional brewers sharing their "shop talk" and someone posting on a food-centric forum designed for the home enthusiast. I suspect your professional beermaster buddies would find a more accessible way to describe things if they were outside their group and hanging out with non-brewing friends or neighbors.
  • Post #13 - October 21st, 2016, 4:09 pm
    Post #13 - October 21st, 2016, 4:09 pm Post #13 - October 21st, 2016, 4:09 pm
    boudreaulicious wrote:
    Christopher Gordon wrote:It will change the way you think about pecorino romano; Steven Jenkins brought us a chunk of his new proprietary cheese and it is phenomenal: quiet, then buttery, then lactic, then herbaceous, a long sloppy kiss of a cheese, then reeling back, realizing what it has done, apologizes with a finish of gratitude.


    I look forward to your posts and much appreciate your flair for language. I'd argue that the height of pretension is posting silly takedowns of others' efforts to share info on a chat site.

    ⬆️ Agreed.
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #14 - October 21st, 2016, 5:15 pm
    Post #14 - October 21st, 2016, 5:15 pm Post #14 - October 21st, 2016, 5:15 pm
    I come here to learn about and discuss food. How this became a thread to debate the merits of a member's writing style, I cannot quite figure out. Surely, people are free to express themselves, but I'm just describing the type of discussion I look forward to finding when I come here: what's on the plate, not the plate.

    So. About pecorino. I've only ever known the condiment version. I think it is Locatelli. It is dry and craggly and quite salty. I like it quite a bit, but only used in a certain way. I have a tough time envisioning what is different about this new cheese, since all the pecorinos I've tried are pretty similar. Is this black market version still pecorino Romano?

    In any case, I'll be looking forward to trying it if it ever comes this way.
  • Post #15 - October 21st, 2016, 6:17 pm
    Post #15 - October 21st, 2016, 6:17 pm Post #15 - October 21st, 2016, 6:17 pm
    spinynorman99 wrote:
    bnowell724 wrote:

    It's Christopher Gordon's normal writing style, and I didn't read it as pretentious. That might be because I've been hanging around a bunch of professional beer brewers lately, and they speak the same way about beer. They're pretty humble, down to earth people, but very serious - even scientific - about beer and creating a balanced finished product. Constant and fanatical attention to the different tastes and flavor compounds that are produced throughout the brewing process is necessary for them to create a great beer - and they do make great beer. I actually have learned from them how to taste and notice the more subtle characteristics of beer, and it's helped me appreciate it more. It's a really cool skill that can be transferred to wine, cheese, or any other food.

    I assume Christopher Gordon - as a cheese monger - has the same mentality as these beer guys, he seems to take his product just as seriously.


    Not to add fuel to the fire, but there's a difference between a bunch of professional brewers sharing their "shop talk" and someone posting on a food-centric forum designed for the home enthusiast. I suspect your professional beermaster buddies would find a more accessible way to describe things if they were outside their group and hanging out with non-brewing friends or neighbors.


    Yeah with shop talk you're right, they would make it more accessible and speak differently. I wasn't clear but I was talking about actual beer tasting - and they use the same food-centric language re: beer whether talking to me (in no way an aficionado) or anyone else. Using culinary terms is a unique approach, but it's sort of their philosophy.
    Logan: Come on, everybody, wang chung tonight! What? Everybody, wang chung tonight! Wang chung, or I'll kick your ass!
  • Post #16 - October 21st, 2016, 10:04 pm
    Post #16 - October 21st, 2016, 10:04 pm Post #16 - October 21st, 2016, 10:04 pm
    Wow, calling WCW, not about the thing but the thing itself. That's a lesson I am always learning. What if I wrote, this is not available in the United States, yet. Made in Italy to the specifications of Stephen Jenkins. If Locatelli or black rind grating pecorino are what you are familiar, wait until you try this stuff, not a condiment cheese, instead, the main event. And, yeah, I was, anyway,

    If one were to approach me in my store I would sneak one a taste; speakeasy, handle Little TH. Otherwise. My GM would kill me. Just such great stuff, I had to share.
    Being gauche rocks, stun the bourgeoisie
  • Post #17 - October 23rd, 2016, 7:46 am
    Post #17 - October 23rd, 2016, 7:46 am Post #17 - October 23rd, 2016, 7:46 am
    spinynorman99 wrote:Not to add fuel to the fire, but there's a difference between a bunch of professional brewers sharing their "shop talk" and someone posting on a food-centric forum designed for the home enthusiast. I suspect your professional beermaster buddies would find a more accessible way to describe things if they were outside their group and hanging out with non-brewing friends or neighbors.


    "More accessible"? It's beyond me how virtually any of the description in the original post is anything but accessible. What's difficult to understand about this language? "It will change the way you think about pecorino romano; Steven Jenkins brought us a chunk of his new proprietary cheese and it is phenomenal: quiet, then buttery, then lactic, then herbaceous..."

    That section contains the single "technical" word in the entire post: "lactic." Surely that's not difficult or inaccessible. The OP follows that straightforward description with "a long sloppy kiss of a cheese"--there can't be too many folks here who don't follow that. In fact, some might even think it pretty creative and vivid language to convey his idea. It captured what he meant and I like to think I understand what he meant.

    I presume it is either that phrase or the ending that has people reacting: "...then reeling back, realizing what it has done, apologizes with a finish of gratitude." The phrase may be too poetic or metaphorical for some--maybe even incomprehensible. Unusual description? You bet. Do you know what he means? I'm not certain I do, either. So what? I think I have some sense of it and even if I'm wrong, I'm grateful for what preceded it and that he took the time to call to the board's attention a cheese we might otherwise never know or even hear about. In my book, that's a pretty valuable contribution to this board.

    As has already been pointed out, the poster has a particularly distinctive style. Go back and look at his posts from ten years ago and you'll find the same thing. I may not always understand Christopher Gordon's posts but I always appreciate the effort and the clear enthusiasm behind them. His style may not speak to you, but I think it's pretty intense and pithy.

    Not everyone likes Faulkner, not everyone likes Hemingway. Just because one may not "get" or like a particular writer's style doesn't seem much of a reason to write him off. We all write in different ways and understand in different ways; if you don't like the writing, skip it. (Hell, if you don't like what a poster has to say on a regular basis, block them.) What baffles me is the perceived need to respond to posts you don't like or don't understand with snark (and no, I don't mean you, spinynorman99).
    Gypsy Boy

    "I am not a glutton--I am an explorer of food." (Erma Bombeck)
  • Post #18 - October 24th, 2016, 10:56 am
    Post #18 - October 24th, 2016, 10:56 am Post #18 - October 24th, 2016, 10:56 am
    Ok, everyone. Let's get back to the cheese, please! :D

    Thanks,

    =R=
    for the Moderators
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #19 - October 24th, 2016, 3:02 pm
    Post #19 - October 24th, 2016, 3:02 pm Post #19 - October 24th, 2016, 3:02 pm
    Someone asked about eating Pecorino out of hand not grated: why not? If it's a good tasty cheese, I would eat it like any other aged cheese. If it's so hard you can't chew it, sure, grate it up. But why not a lovely piece of Pecorino with a nice glass of a Pecorino white wine (yes, it's Italy, they make wine there too).
    Leek

    SAVING ONE DOG may not change the world,
    but it CHANGES THE WORLD for that one dog.
    American Brittany Rescue always needs foster homes. Please think about helping that one dog. http://www.americanbrittanyrescue.org
  • Post #20 - October 25th, 2016, 10:13 pm
    Post #20 - October 25th, 2016, 10:13 pm Post #20 - October 25th, 2016, 10:13 pm
    The cheese is available this January.
    Being gauche rocks, stun the bourgeoisie
  • Post #21 - October 26th, 2016, 5:01 am
    Post #21 - October 26th, 2016, 5:01 am Post #21 - October 26th, 2016, 5:01 am
    I have no problem with Christopher's writing style. It's chewy, herbaceous, fruity, a bit whimsical. I tend to wax nostalgic the same way at times, though not in the cheese arena.

    Besides, he's doing me the favor of hooking me up with a guy in NYC that knows some people in Rome that have expertise about Pecorino Romano when I am there in March. So he's good people to me.
  • Post #22 - October 26th, 2016, 8:13 am
    Post #22 - October 26th, 2016, 8:13 am Post #22 - October 26th, 2016, 8:13 am
    Christopher Gordon wrote:The cheese is available this January.

    NO...
    Should be.....


    Chilling winds careen through concrete and glass canyons, fur feather and fin tremble awestruck of Jack Frost's temper
    no hope/reprieve/relinquish
    Stinging frozen eyes light softly upon romano redemption, precious pecorino teasing with gentle suggestion hope is not lost, deliciousness afoot
    No apology necessary, Cubs win in 7, love unrequited no more.............
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #23 - October 26th, 2016, 11:39 am
    Post #23 - October 26th, 2016, 11:39 am Post #23 - October 26th, 2016, 11:39 am
    :shock:

    You...you...pot-stirrer, you!
    Gypsy Boy

    "I am not a glutton--I am an explorer of food." (Erma Bombeck)
  • Post #24 - October 26th, 2016, 1:19 pm
    Post #24 - October 26th, 2016, 1:19 pm Post #24 - October 26th, 2016, 1:19 pm
    Gypsy Boy wrote:You...you...pot-stirrer, you!

    Pot stirring was not my intention.

    I simply wanted CG to realize even if some of us, including me, occasionally read his posts shake our heads and mouth W-T-F doesn't mean we/me/others wish he modify his unique style.

    (Insert something pithy about Jack Web and the world wide web -->here<--)
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #25 - October 27th, 2016, 6:22 am
    Post #25 - October 27th, 2016, 6:22 am Post #25 - October 27th, 2016, 6:22 am
    Agreed. And, to bring things back full circle, I've been enjoying some fairly good pecorino lately, but the news about this particular cheese has me salivating. I hope it turns out to be available in some fashion--I'd love to sample some.
    Gypsy Boy

    "I am not a glutton--I am an explorer of food." (Erma Bombeck)
  • Post #26 - March 18th, 2021, 6:33 pm
    Post #26 - March 18th, 2021, 6:33 pm Post #26 - March 18th, 2021, 6:33 pm
    Hi,

    I am still processing this information: I just learned Christopher Gordon died.

    It was in my plan to visit him in Casey, Illinois once the cloud of the pandemic was over. I intended to bring some foodstuffs he might have a hankering for and had not yet to find in his new home region.

    He was once in Lake Forest for a week setting up a new store. I fully intended to visit and forgot about the timing.

    I thought this thread was as good a place to advise, because so much of him was invested in this thread's content.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #27 - March 18th, 2021, 6:45 pm
    Post #27 - March 18th, 2021, 6:45 pm Post #27 - March 18th, 2021, 6:45 pm
    Oh, my. No!

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #28 - March 18th, 2021, 8:24 pm
    Post #28 - March 18th, 2021, 8:24 pm Post #28 - March 18th, 2021, 8:24 pm
    What??? Terrible.
  • Post #29 - March 18th, 2021, 8:48 pm
    Post #29 - March 18th, 2021, 8:48 pm Post #29 - March 18th, 2021, 8:48 pm
    So sorry to hear this. I remember he gave me some ribbing for my early posts. But I eventually gathered that we traveled in overlapping circles. He had impeccable taste in music and cheese. And a way with the loquacious prose. Rest in peace CG.
  • Post #30 - March 18th, 2021, 9:36 pm
    Post #30 - March 18th, 2021, 9:36 pm Post #30 - March 18th, 2021, 9:36 pm
    Jefe wrote:I remember he gave me some ribbing for my early posts.

    There was a period of time when he gave a hard time to newbies. I finally highlighted to him his early posts and how welcoming people were. I asked him to give newbies the same break others gave to him. He did not say anything exactly, though he did in deed.

    I was hoping to do a program on cheese with him, but it was waiting for the pandemic cloud to part.

    Regards,
    CAthy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast

Contact

About

Team

Advertize

Close

Chat

Articles

Guide

Events

more