LTH Home

Fruit Salad

Fruit Salad
  • Forum HomePost Reply BackTop
  • Fruit Salad

    Post #1 - January 19th, 2017, 11:56 am
    Post #1 - January 19th, 2017, 11:56 am Post #1 - January 19th, 2017, 11:56 am
    Hi,

    Next week, I am hosting a morning meeting. It's the type where you have a Continental breakfast: coffee, juice, fresh cut fruit and sweet rolls.

    I am going to shake this up a little bit. I plan bake an apple cake, a cranberry-nut bar and a third item not yet decided.

    Instead of cut fruit, I was thinking of a fruit salad. One I really like is made with slightly frozen fruit with cream poured over it. I saw this fruit salad from the Pioneer Woman with an orange-vanilla syrup poured over it.

    If you have a fruit salad you're pleased with, please do share! Alternatively, if you saw something that does not work, well pointers are always appreciated.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #2 - January 19th, 2017, 12:19 pm
    Post #2 - January 19th, 2017, 12:19 pm Post #2 - January 19th, 2017, 12:19 pm
    Make the syrup/sauce for the fruit on the side. If you have diabetics or lactose-intolerant they will thank you.
    Leek

    SAVING ONE DOG may not change the world,
    but it CHANGES THE WORLD for that one dog.
    American Brittany Rescue always needs foster homes. Please think about helping that one dog. http://www.americanbrittanyrescue.org
  • Post #3 - January 19th, 2017, 12:29 pm
    Post #3 - January 19th, 2017, 12:29 pm Post #3 - January 19th, 2017, 12:29 pm
    My mothers way of making fruit salad was to add fresh lemon juice and squeeze the juice from an orange and a grapefruit right onto the cut fruit. Add a bit of sugar and stir. People tend to like the juice at the bottom as much as the fruit.
  • Post #4 - January 19th, 2017, 2:50 pm
    Post #4 - January 19th, 2017, 2:50 pm Post #4 - January 19th, 2017, 2:50 pm
    I get dibs on the leftovers.... :D
    Never order barbecue in a place that also serves quiche - Lewis Grizzard
  • Post #5 - January 29th, 2017, 5:54 pm
    Post #5 - January 29th, 2017, 5:54 pm Post #5 - January 29th, 2017, 5:54 pm
    Hi,

    Thanks for all the tips.

    What I finally made was a mixture of fresh and canned fruit, because a lot of fruit at the store was under ripe.

    The night before:

    Fresh fruit:
    - Segmented navel oranges
    - Halved red grapes

    Canned fruit, drained:
    - Pear halves, which was sliced into smaller segments
    - Peach slices, which was sliced in half on a bias
    - Pineapple chunks, which was sliced in half to niblet size

    The morning of:
    - Sliced strawberries, which were lightly macerated with sugar and added some vanilla.
    - Blueberries

    I had thought to reduce the peach juice, then decided to do nothing.

    Mixed everything together.

    I decided to skip banana, because its fine fresh, but not so much when sitting around. I contemplated adding apple, though it was already in a cake.

    I intentionally avoided grapefruit, since it causes problems with some medications.

    People seemed to like it. Leftovers were quite fine.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #6 - January 30th, 2017, 11:06 am
    Post #6 - January 30th, 2017, 11:06 am Post #6 - January 30th, 2017, 11:06 am
    Way back in the mists of time, we used to make a fruit salad that contained any kind of fruit or berries that were available plus two special ingredients.

    The first was oranges cut a certain way -- the peel was carefully sliced off and then the oranges were sliced to make 'sunbursts'. What can I tell you? It was the height of trendy sophistication at that moment.*

    The second ingredient was a small can of frozen raspberries. They came in a sort of rectangular can with sugary syrup. I wonder if anything like that is even still available any more since we now have individually frozen fruit segments.

    The raspberries were dumped onto the top of the rest of the fruit and allowed to thaw a bit, then stirred in. They were sweet from the syrup and they gave some color to the rest of the fruit. In fact, it was a good way to 'improve' the fruit if any of it was not to sweet or perfectly ripe.

    *These days, the trendy cut in oranges is 'supremes' imho.
  • Post #7 - January 30th, 2017, 11:36 am
    Post #7 - January 30th, 2017, 11:36 am Post #7 - January 30th, 2017, 11:36 am
    Joy wrote:*These days, the trendy cut in oranges is 'supremes' imho.

    Or what I called segments, ie without any membranes.

    The peaches and pears at Jewel had no give. No frozen raspberries could save them. BTW - those containers of frozen raspberries in sugar still exist.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #8 - February 14th, 2017, 8:13 am
    Post #8 - February 14th, 2017, 8:13 am Post #8 - February 14th, 2017, 8:13 am
    Love it.
    I would so appreciate a photo of both of these ways to cut oranges.
    Any links?
    Thank you.
  • Post #9 - February 14th, 2017, 9:16 am
    Post #9 - February 14th, 2017, 9:16 am Post #9 - February 14th, 2017, 9:16 am
    jilter wrote:Love it.
    I would so appreciate a photo of both of these ways to cut oranges.
    Any links?
    Thank you.



    Here you are Jilter:

    http://bakingbites.com/2011/04/how-to-s ... an-orange/
    “There are people in the world so hungry, that God cannot appear to them except in the form of bread.”
    ― Mahatma Gandhi
  • Post #10 - February 14th, 2017, 12:11 pm
    Post #10 - February 14th, 2017, 12:11 pm Post #10 - February 14th, 2017, 12:11 pm
    Thanks for the very good 'how-to' link! Cutting these segments will give you very good knowledge of how sharp your knives are. :-)

    I agree with Cathy. These should be called 'segments'.

    Or at the very least, please, you can call call them 'supreems', pronounced with the long eeee. Not the pretentious 'suprems' with the last syllable pronounced as 'prem', heard on some tv cooking shows. What is that supposed to be? French? hahaha
  • Post #11 - February 14th, 2017, 12:51 pm
    Post #11 - February 14th, 2017, 12:51 pm Post #11 - February 14th, 2017, 12:51 pm
    You can cut supremes by hand or you can go the "lazy-man" route and use an enzyme to dissolve the pith:

    http://www.modernistpantry.com/pectinex-ultra-spl.html
  • Post #12 - February 14th, 2017, 2:11 pm
    Post #12 - February 14th, 2017, 2:11 pm Post #12 - February 14th, 2017, 2:11 pm
    spinynorman99 wrote:You can cut supremes by hand or you can go the "lazy-man" route and use an enzyme to dissolve the pith:

    http://www.modernistpantry.com/pectinex-ultra-spl.html



    That is very interesting, I have never seen that product before. I think supreming fruit is great skill to practice, I remember doing it over and over and over in culinary school and my first jobs. As with all kitchen tasks a sharp knife is a must and it is a nice way to hone your technique!
    “There are people in the world so hungry, that God cannot appear to them except in the form of bread.”
    ― Mahatma Gandhi
  • Post #13 - February 15th, 2017, 12:39 am
    Post #13 - February 15th, 2017, 12:39 am Post #13 - February 15th, 2017, 12:39 am
    Joy wrote:Or at the very least, please, you can call call them 'supreems', pronounced with the long eeee. Not the pretentious 'suprems' with the last syllable pronounced as 'prem', heard on some tv cooking shows. What is that supposed to be? French? hahaha

    Pronounce 'supreme' like, " Diana Ross and the Supremes!"
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #14 - February 15th, 2017, 10:10 am
    Post #14 - February 15th, 2017, 10:10 am Post #14 - February 15th, 2017, 10:10 am
    Joy wrote: What is that supposed to be? French?

    Yes.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #15 - May 27th, 2021, 12:50 pm
    Post #15 - May 27th, 2021, 12:50 pm Post #15 - May 27th, 2021, 12:50 pm
    Hi,

    A relic in my pantry not consumed during my Covid-related clean the shelves of the odd bits: canned pie filling.

    Today I took a can of strawberry pie filling, then mixed in chopped apples. The pie filling had the advantage of thoroughly coating the apple thus delaying or stopping any oxidation.

    If you are using fruits that oxidize and want to avoid mayo, canned pie filling with a carefully chosen complimentary fruit could be useful.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #16 - May 27th, 2021, 3:42 pm
    Post #16 - May 27th, 2021, 3:42 pm Post #16 - May 27th, 2021, 3:42 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:A relic in my pantry not consumed during my Covid-related clean the shelves of the odd bits: canned pie filling.

    Would this happen to be the one from a long ago Saturday Freebie @ Jewel? :D
    Never order barbecue in a place that also serves quiche - Lewis Grizzard

Contact

About

Team

Advertize

Close

Chat

Articles

Guide

Events

more