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The Impossible Burger

The Impossible Burger
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  • Post #91 - November 10th, 2020, 4:54 pm
    Post #91 - November 10th, 2020, 4:54 pm Post #91 - November 10th, 2020, 4:54 pm
    JoelF wrote:How about Veg-i-Mac, or McMeatless?

    "McVeggie" sounds better than your two.

    I'd fire McFire you, too.
    We cannot be friends if you do not know the difference between Mayo and Miracle Whip.
  • Post #92 - November 10th, 2020, 9:03 pm
    Post #92 - November 10th, 2020, 9:03 pm Post #92 - November 10th, 2020, 9:03 pm
    McPlant sounds like a Beatles/Zeppelin tribute band.
  • Post #93 - November 11th, 2020, 10:18 am
    Post #93 - November 11th, 2020, 10:18 am Post #93 - November 11th, 2020, 10:18 am
    Presumably it could be called McSoybean but that would not sound good?

    My first experience with a veggie burger was IIRC gold coast dogs on State (Wabash?) just north of the river in the 1980s or earlier. I asked and was told the main ingredient was brazil nuts. It was not imitatioin beef, but very good in its own right, I'd buy them just because they were good.

    Does anybody know of anything like that?
    --Carey aka underdog
  • Post #94 - November 11th, 2020, 12:20 pm
    Post #94 - November 11th, 2020, 12:20 pm Post #94 - November 11th, 2020, 12:20 pm
    JoelF wrote:
    Dave148 wrote:
    McDonald’s to launch its own plant-based burger, the McPlant, after Beyond Meat test

    https://www.marketwatch.com/story/mcdon ... 1604949575

    Ugh, fire their branding manager.
    McPlant? I'm not McLovin it.
    How about Veg-i-Mac, or McMeatless?


    Odd. If they don't have vegetarian fries I doubt it will move the vegetarian customers to McD's.
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #95 - November 11th, 2020, 1:47 pm
    Post #95 - November 11th, 2020, 1:47 pm Post #95 - November 11th, 2020, 1:47 pm
    diversedancer wrote:My first experience with a veggie burger was IIRC gold coast dogs on State (Wabash?) just north of the river in the 1980s or earlier. I asked and was told the main ingredient was brazil nuts. It was not imitatioin beef, but very good in its own right, I'd buy them just because they were good.

    Does anybody know of anything like that?

    The first Gold Coast Dogs opened on the southwest corner of State & Hubbard in 1985. Even in their early days GCD served meatless items like veggie burgers and grilled tuna sandwiches. I think a veggie burger is still on the menu at whatever locations may be open now. I have no idea how similar it is to what you describe. It sounds a bit like a 'nut roast,' the classic British vegetarian main dish. I imagine you could shape it into burgers instead of forming it into the traditional loaf. You can find countless recipes; this one from BBC sounds especially good.
  • Post #96 - November 11th, 2020, 3:15 pm
    Post #96 - November 11th, 2020, 3:15 pm Post #96 - November 11th, 2020, 3:15 pm
    The late M Henrietta (former companion restaurant to M Henry) made a vegan meatloaf that was legitimately one of the best meat substitutes I've ever had. It was a blend of nuts, brown rice, nutritional yeast and some other ingredients. Truly delicious. Just did a quick google and found it (almost 10 years old):

    https://abc7chicago.com/archive/8354012/
  • Post #97 - November 12th, 2020, 6:09 pm
    Post #97 - November 12th, 2020, 6:09 pm Post #97 - November 12th, 2020, 6:09 pm
    Hi,

    A few weeks ago, a friend dropped off the Farmland version of plant based kinda sorta like meat. Her husband had been sent to the store to buy ground beef and came back with plant based look alike. They were not interested in trying it, so they wisely dropped it off at my house.

    A few people have inquired privately why people send their unwanted food to me. Exactly when this trend started, I cannot really recall. I guess in my circle of non-food-centric friends (yes, I have friends who don't really think too hard about their next meal), I am known to like a challenge. Plus they don't want to throw it away and know I don't mind being the place the can lands after being kicked again.

    I recall from eating prior examples of plant-based 'meats,' I am fine until I identify some underlying non-meat-associated tastes like cooked peas. I have found drowning the plant-based meat substitute in a strong flavored sauce works well for me.

    Today, I made a taco salad with the major components of cooked ground plant-based 'meat,' chopped onions, tomatoes, slivered cabbage (a substitute for lettuce) and cheese are cloaked in Catalina dressing.

    'Browning' the plant-based 'meat' was a study in futility. It never browned, it remained red while crumbling smaller and smaller. A small taste of this cooked 'meat' had enough salt and seasoning without any additions from my side. Unlike some plant-based 'meats,' there was no oozing of oils when cooking. Nor does the volume shrink by 10-20% like ground beef. A one-to-one substitute of the Farmland product to ground beef nets a greater volume of plant-based 'meat' to the ground beef it substitutes.

    The family liked the overall taste of their meal, which I squarely give a nod to the homemade Catalina dressing. It would offer great flavor to cardboard.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #98 - November 16th, 2020, 12:18 pm
    Post #98 - November 16th, 2020, 12:18 pm Post #98 - November 16th, 2020, 12:18 pm
    Rene G wrote:It sounds a bit like a 'nut roast,' the classic British vegetarian main dish. I imagine you could shape it into burgers instead of forming it into the traditional loaf. You can find countless recipes; this one from BBC sounds especially good.

    Nut roasts (with ten recipes) are in the news today!

    In The Guardian, Stuart Heritage wrote:If you don’t eat meat, then Christmas (or Thanksgiving, or even just a Sunday lunch) can be upsettingly hit and miss. The closest thing to a traditional meal you will encounter is an old-fashioned nut roast, and God knows what a minefield those can be. Pick a bad recipe and you’ll end up with something inedibly dry, or unattractively crumbly, or just plain dense and tasteless.
  • Post #99 - November 16th, 2020, 12:59 pm
    Post #99 - November 16th, 2020, 12:59 pm Post #99 - November 16th, 2020, 12:59 pm
    Rene G wrote:
    Rene G wrote:It sounds a bit like a 'nut roast,' the classic British vegetarian main dish. I imagine you could shape it into burgers instead of forming it into the traditional loaf. You can find countless recipes; this one from BBC sounds especially good.

    Nut roasts (with ten recipes) are in the news today!

    In The Guardian, Stuart Heritage wrote:If you don’t eat meat, then Christmas (or Thanksgiving, or even just a Sunday lunch) can be upsettingly hit and miss. The closest thing to a traditional meal you will encounter is an old-fashioned nut roast, and God knows what a minefield those can be. Pick a bad recipe and you’ll end up with something inedibly dry, or unattractively crumbly, or just plain dense and tasteless.


    I had the pleasure of a delicious meal years ago prepared by petite gourmande. She made incredible vegetable wellingtons. It wasn't close to hit or miss for that holiday meal.
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening

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