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Giardiniera

Giardiniera
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  • Post #61 - July 27th, 2011, 10:32 pm
    Post #61 - July 27th, 2011, 10:32 pm Post #61 - July 27th, 2011, 10:32 pm
    Does anyone know what type of peppers are typically used in giardinera?
    They don't taste like jalapeños - I'm guessing maybe serranos?
  • Post #62 - July 28th, 2011, 11:35 pm
    Post #62 - July 28th, 2011, 11:35 pm Post #62 - July 28th, 2011, 11:35 pm
    zoid wrote:Does anyone know what type of peppers are typically used in giardinera?
    They don't taste like jalapeños - I'm guessing maybe serranos?


    My parents and grandparents made a mild version with garden Melrose Peppers, which seems to have been pretty common with southern Italians on the West Side. If they wanted any heat, it was from a hot variety of these guys I haven't seen on a plant since I was a kid (friggitelli, used for jarred peperoncini).

    I use serranos from Tony's, or a mix of mild farmers' market (whatever looks good at Oak Park) and a jalapeno. The true key for nostalgic flavor (and this is what matches close to most of the Midwest small factory-produced, as well) is really average, mild olive oil, and plain old Heinz (or cheaper) white vinegar, which has low acidity. I've tried fancy vinegar and good olive oil and it just doesn't taste right.
  • Post #63 - July 29th, 2011, 7:04 pm
    Post #63 - July 29th, 2011, 7:04 pm Post #63 - July 29th, 2011, 7:04 pm
    I've always thought that - here in Chicagoland, at least - that the peppers in giardinera were "sport peppers" of the same type as put on hot dogs. At Johnnie's Beef, I think the hot giardinera is composed of sports, for example...
    "Barbecue sauce is like a beautiful woman. If it’s too sweet, it’s bound to be hiding something."
    — Lyle Lovett


    "How do you say 'Yum-o' in Swedish? Or is it Swiss? What do they speak in Switzerland?"- Rachel Ray
  • Post #64 - July 29th, 2011, 10:42 pm
    Post #64 - July 29th, 2011, 10:42 pm Post #64 - July 29th, 2011, 10:42 pm
    mchodera wrote:I've always thought that - here in Chicagoland, at least - that the peppers in giardinera were "sport peppers" of the same type as put on hot dogs.

    I'm not an authority, but I don't believe so... at least not commonly. Sport peppers are much more thin-skinned than what's typically in giardiniera, no? (There are, of course, scads of exceptions.)
    Dominic Armato
    Dining Critic
    The Arizona Republic and azcentral.com
  • Post #65 - July 30th, 2011, 1:34 pm
    Post #65 - July 30th, 2011, 1:34 pm Post #65 - July 30th, 2011, 1:34 pm
    Pretty sure the giardiniera at johnnie's uses serranos, just like almost everyone else in Chicago.
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #66 - August 25th, 2011, 2:44 pm
    Post #66 - August 25th, 2011, 2:44 pm Post #66 - August 25th, 2011, 2:44 pm
    FWIW-I made a batch this past weekend using a quick brine method that worked pretty well. After cutting the veg I blanched them in heavily salted water for 20-30 seconds the shocked them in salted ice water where they sat for a couple hours. Then proceed as normal.
  • Post #67 - July 29th, 2012, 8:40 am
    Post #67 - July 29th, 2012, 8:40 am Post #67 - July 29th, 2012, 8:40 am
    A houseguest from out of town would like a jar to take home. As I cannot eat giardiniera for food allergy reasons, I haven't ever purchased it. There is some old conversation in this thread about brands interspersed with the wise advice to simply make it at home; does anyone happen to have new or definitive jarred favorites (including the brand and a place to buy it would be very helpful). Thanks!
  • Post #68 - July 29th, 2012, 9:29 am
    Post #68 - July 29th, 2012, 9:29 am Post #68 - July 29th, 2012, 9:29 am
    I'm partial to the stuff at Bari. You can buy it in varying levels of heat. The Extra Hot is REALLY Extra Hot, so be aware of that when you choose, depending on the spice tolerance of the giftee.

    Bari Foods
    1120 W Grand
    Chicago, IL 60642
    (312) 666-0730
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #69 - July 29th, 2012, 11:58 am
    Post #69 - July 29th, 2012, 11:58 am Post #69 - July 29th, 2012, 11:58 am
    stevez wrote:I'm partial to the stuff at Bari. You can buy it in varying levels of heat. The Extra Hot is REALLY Extra Hot, so be aware of that when you choose, depending on the spice tolerance of the giftee.
    Agreed on both counts - best giardiniera around, and the Super Hot is way too spicy for normal humans to consume.

    -Dan
  • Post #70 - July 29th, 2012, 8:15 pm
    Post #70 - July 29th, 2012, 8:15 pm Post #70 - July 29th, 2012, 8:15 pm
    The extra hot/super hot or whatever they call it awesome, but it's pretty much pure habaneros. I was surprised when I first bought a jar. I wasn't expecting a jar full of habs, but I was pleasantly surprised. One of my favorites.
  • Post #71 - July 30th, 2012, 9:54 am
    Post #71 - July 30th, 2012, 9:54 am Post #71 - July 30th, 2012, 9:54 am
    Bari does have good giardiniera, but it is not really indicative of the typical style (chunks are too large). Al's has one of the thinnest sliced veggies and you can buy a pint or so to go. Much like IBs, everyone does have their own preference for what style they like.
  • Post #72 - July 30th, 2012, 12:49 pm
    Post #72 - July 30th, 2012, 12:49 pm Post #72 - July 30th, 2012, 12:49 pm
    I always have a jar of giardiniera from Connies (7600 Grand) in my refrigerator. Nice pepper level, with the very thinly sliced veggies that I prefer. Very tasty and priced around 3.00 per bottle
  • Post #73 - July 30th, 2012, 12:57 pm
    Post #73 - July 30th, 2012, 12:57 pm Post #73 - July 30th, 2012, 12:57 pm
    annak wrote:A houseguest from out of town would like a jar to take home. As I cannot eat giardiniera for food allergy reasons, I haven't ever purchased it. There is some old conversation in this thread about brands interspersed with the wise advice to simply make it at home; does anyone happen to have new or definitive jarred favorites (including the brand and a place to buy it would be very helpful). Thanks!

    I've liked the giardiniera from That Pickle Guy. I picked up mine from the Skokie Farmer's Market. Other markets and retail locations are on the website.

    http://www.thatpickleguy.com/
    -Mary
  • Post #74 - August 2nd, 2012, 10:01 am
    Post #74 - August 2nd, 2012, 10:01 am Post #74 - August 2nd, 2012, 10:01 am
    I like everything from That Pickle Guy, and the giard is a very good example of typical beef stand giardiniera. Much more 'traditional' than bari.
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #75 - August 2nd, 2012, 1:47 pm
    Post #75 - August 2nd, 2012, 1:47 pm Post #75 - August 2nd, 2012, 1:47 pm
    Thats some nice looking giardi there. I would love to make it. My family puts it on almost everything, Pizza, pasta whatever. They need a little more of something with their food. My sister in law moved to Florida and regularly stocks up here on visits as they do not have it there. She carted forty dollars worth of the big jars of dellalpe with her to take back. Keep upright!!! do not store on side!!!
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #76 - August 7th, 2012, 6:24 pm
    Post #76 - August 7th, 2012, 6:24 pm Post #76 - August 7th, 2012, 6:24 pm
    Is giardiniera strictly a Chicago thing?

    Tried to buy some a couple years ago in Pittsburgh; nobody had ever heard of it. We hit every specialty food store and several restaurants on The Strip, a funky shopping area in Pittsburgh, and drew a blank everywhere. No one had ever heard of it, let alone have it on hand.

    Haven't tried this in other parts of the country... is this indicative of the rest of the USA?
    Mike :?
    Suburban gourmand
  • Post #77 - August 7th, 2012, 6:50 pm
    Post #77 - August 7th, 2012, 6:50 pm Post #77 - August 7th, 2012, 6:50 pm
    I've only seen it in New York in a few Italian dry goods stores, and Arabic stores. The brands were all from Chicago, Marconi and Ziyad, respectively. So yeah, pretty much a Chicago thing, though I suspect local variations on the spicy/oil/pickle concept must exist.
    "By the fig, the olive..." Surat Al-Teen, Mecca 95:1"
  • Post #78 - August 7th, 2012, 6:52 pm
    Post #78 - August 7th, 2012, 6:52 pm Post #78 - August 7th, 2012, 6:52 pm
    That's been my experience. Kind of like IB but I believe word is spreading as Chicagoans sometimes open beef stands when they move away.
  • Post #79 - August 8th, 2012, 8:25 am
    Post #79 - August 8th, 2012, 8:25 am Post #79 - August 8th, 2012, 8:25 am
    I could swear I've seen it elsewhere, but it wasn't the oily concoction we're used to here, but rather just a pickle of fresh garden vegetables, like cauliflower, carrots, onions, and celery. Actually, it looks like Wikipedia has a picture of what I've seen outside Chicago. Now where I saw this, I can't exactly remember. I'm thinking it was in Philadelphia.

    Actually, here's an article I found about Philadelphia dishes, and there's a picture of a cheesesteak with the type of giardiniera I described above. Also, my friend's family from Naples makes giardiniera in that pickled style without oil, too. I'm thinking the oily version might be an Italian-American, possibly specifically Chicagoan, thing.
  • Post #80 - November 12th, 2012, 10:02 am
    Post #80 - November 12th, 2012, 10:02 am Post #80 - November 12th, 2012, 10:02 am
    my first attempt, read a bit of this thread as well as other research. thanks.

    Curious to see how this batch turns out, oil/vinegar and spice(black pepper, garlic, oregano,) whisked up to be almost a vinagrette. Flavors were good just sampling during the process. Looking forward to trying it after a few days in the fridge.

    I used:

    8 jalapenos - sliced, then rough chop
    2 stalks celery - chopped
    2 carrots - chopped
    1/2 onion - chopped

    I tossed the above in a bowl with 1/2 cup of kosher salt and covered with water Refridgerated for about 8 hours, tasting along the way until I was happy with texture and salt content. Rinsed and set aside

    tossed in a bowl:

    black pepper
    oregano
    4 cloves minced garlic

    added:
    1/2 cup apple cider vinegar
    1/2 cup white vinegar
    3/4 cup canola oil
    1/2 cup olive oil

    I poured the liquid over the rinsed veg. adding a jar of green olives to the mix. Tossed the mix into a clean mason jar and sealed:

    here is the best pic I came up with, pictured behind some abt's i did:

    Image
    Last edited by jimswside on November 12th, 2012, 11:05 am, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #81 - November 12th, 2012, 10:09 am
    Post #81 - November 12th, 2012, 10:09 am Post #81 - November 12th, 2012, 10:09 am
    jimswside wrote:my first attempt, read a bit of this thread as well as other research.


    Looks good Jim. Let us know how it turns out after it "cures" a bit.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #82 - November 24th, 2012, 6:12 am
    Post #82 - November 24th, 2012, 6:12 am Post #82 - November 24th, 2012, 6:12 am
    pretty happy with this first try(my bro in law was happy to take 1/2 of this container home), might kick back a little on the cider vinegar and increase the pepper content/variety, and add more green olives. :D

    Image
  • Post #83 - November 24th, 2012, 8:46 am
    Post #83 - November 24th, 2012, 8:46 am Post #83 - November 24th, 2012, 8:46 am
    I do like carrots but wonder if they are traditional in giardiniera. I know of two types of this kind of preparation. One is a more vinegar based preparation containing cauliflower, carrots, olives, and the like with bigger chunks, more like a pickled salad. To me that is not giardiniera. The other is the stuff served at Italian beef stands which is chopped fine and mostly green, consisting of peppers and olives and very oily. This is the real thing to me. Now I am confused if both are considered giardiniera. And what of the muffaletta type oliver spread? I think the wikipedia page is wrong and should be changed. If giardiniera is a chicago thing then wikipedia should be updated to reflect its true origins and set the record straight. (I do not know what straight is at this point but I have my thoughts).
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #84 - April 29th, 2014, 2:21 pm
    Post #84 - April 29th, 2014, 2:21 pm Post #84 - April 29th, 2014, 2:21 pm
    I saw this on WGN noon segment:

    Executive Chef John Coletta of Quartino Ristorante & Wine Bar prepares Giardiniera alla Romana with the recipe attached.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #85 - January 22nd, 2015, 11:54 pm
    Post #85 - January 22nd, 2015, 11:54 pm Post #85 - January 22nd, 2015, 11:54 pm
    I am SO digging this thread and I'm sad I didn't come across it sooner. Thank you so much for this and the recipes too! I'm a huge giardiniera lover too - right now I literally have more than 50 brands at home (some people think I have a giardiniera OCD problem).

    Some of my favorites are (I dig the hot and extra hot ones): J.P. Grazanio’s (Victoria Brand), Tentua’s in Kenosha (worth the drive to just wander their beautiful store and deli, but you can also get it online), Freddy’s Pizza in Cicero, Capri in Riverforst, That Pickle Guy, Bari, Frankie’s Deli in Lombard, Glorioso’s in Milwaukee (can get it online too), Chicago Johnny’s, Kelsey D’s and Tony’s Deli in Edison Park.

    I actually just started a site and Facebook page dedicated to Chicago style giardiniera...on the site I'm trying to list (and eat) all the giardinieras out there. I think I have the majority of giardinieras covered (I'm a couple weeks in and I have about 120 brands listed so far), but I know there's others and I want to try them all! My email is eatgiardiniera at gmail dot com if you guys have a sec to check it out and make sure I have your favorites listed (big favor I know, but I know you guys are the experts!). Eventually I'll get user reviews on the site and a better design and all the fancy stuff - the site's just in the beginning stages right now. It just breaks my heart that this condiment is so under appreciated in the broader U.S. and I love that there are so many good people like yourselves that really love it as much as I do. Any help is greatly appreciated! Thanks folks!
  • Post #86 - July 3rd, 2021, 7:24 am
    Post #86 - July 3rd, 2021, 7:24 am Post #86 - July 3rd, 2021, 7:24 am
    Just in time for 4th of July, my never going to be famous all purpose GiardMustard condiment. Equal parts giardiniera/yellow mustard, blend. Bob's yer Uncle!

    Perfect on Joseph's Finest Meats natural casing hot dogs, Italian sausage, burgers, brats, Tony B’s Steak Chips and ice cream.

    click to enlarge
    Image
    Image
    Image

    GiardMustard, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #87 - July 3rd, 2021, 11:58 am
    Post #87 - July 3rd, 2021, 11:58 am Post #87 - July 3rd, 2021, 11:58 am
    Gary-

    What flavor of ice cream do you put it on?

    Thanks, Will
  • Post #88 - July 3rd, 2021, 2:03 pm
    Post #88 - July 3rd, 2021, 2:03 pm Post #88 - July 3rd, 2021, 2:03 pm
    WillG wrote:What flavor of ice cream do you put it on?

    Mackerel.
    =-=-
    Joseph's Finest Meats natural casing hot dogs, GiardMustard, onion, sport pepper, pickle, tomato, celery salt = lunch. 4th of July!

    click to enlarge
    Image

    GiardMustard, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #89 - July 7th, 2021, 10:13 pm
    Post #89 - July 7th, 2021, 10:13 pm Post #89 - July 7th, 2021, 10:13 pm
    I hear there's a new giardiniera sauce at Portillo's. Anyone try it yet?

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