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looking for tips on healthy eating

looking for tips on healthy eating
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  • looking for tips on healthy eating

    Post #1 - August 21st, 2019, 1:29 pm
    Post #1 - August 21st, 2019, 1:29 pm Post #1 - August 21st, 2019, 1:29 pm
    I am looking for blog and recipe book recommendations for healthy eating (that does not sacrifice taste). We aren't on a diet to lose weight. I prefer recipes that contain ingredients that aren't hard to find (e.g. thai chili peppers). Thanks in advance.

    On a sidenote, I grew Thai basil, but did not grow Thai chili. :(
  • Post #2 - August 21st, 2019, 5:56 pm
    Post #2 - August 21st, 2019, 5:56 pm Post #2 - August 21st, 2019, 5:56 pm
    Mark Bittman:

    "Eat food, not too much, mostly plants."

    Bittman's "Best Recipes in the World" might be worth looking at.

    I've always loved Molly Katzen's "Enchanted Broccoli Forest" for vegetarian cooking.

    There are just so many cookbooks. Check out whatever interests you via the library before you invest. Inter-library loan is your very good friend.

    Giovanna
    =o=o=o=o=o=o=o=o=o=o=o=

    "Enjoy every sandwich."

    -Warren Zevon
  • Post #3 - August 21st, 2019, 6:03 pm
    Post #3 - August 21st, 2019, 6:03 pm Post #3 - August 21st, 2019, 6:03 pm
    Giovanna wrote:Mark Bittman:

    "Eat food, not too much, mostly plants."

    That quotation was actually Michael Pollan.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #4 - August 21st, 2019, 7:19 pm
    Post #4 - August 21st, 2019, 7:19 pm Post #4 - August 21st, 2019, 7:19 pm
    Neither a blog nor a recipe book (so not quite responsive, sorry), but my go-to source for in-depth nutrition information is Dr. Andrew Weil's book, Eating Well for Optimum Health. It's kind of like a textbook on nutrition but without the annoying end-of-chapter quizzes. He's got a website and blog too, but I don't check them; I do recommend the book, though.

    For quick nutrition information on any specific food item, I recommend Self magazine's Nutrition Data website. You don't have to go through the magazine, just type nutritiondata.com or nutritiondata.self.com and type in the food item at the upper right.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #5 - August 21st, 2019, 7:26 pm
    Post #5 - August 21st, 2019, 7:26 pm Post #5 - August 21st, 2019, 7:26 pm
    Mark’s Daily Apple a great site to learn about keto and various recipes. The site was created and is run by Mark Sisson who is 66 years old this year and in better physical health than people half his age. Mark is also the founder of Primal Kitchen paleo food brand.

    Check out the site as it has a wealth of info including recipes:
    https://www.marksdailyapple.com/

    Mark's Instagram:
    https://www.instagram.com/marksissonprimal/
  • Post #6 - August 22nd, 2019, 8:52 am
    Post #6 - August 22nd, 2019, 8:52 am Post #6 - August 22nd, 2019, 8:52 am
    Barbara Rolls Volumetrics
    Joel Furhman’s Eat to Live
    Michael Greger and Gene Stone’s How Not to Die Cookbook
    Yotam Ottolenghi’s Plenty

    Michael Pollan’s In Defense of Food is the best mantra, ”Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.”

    Eating Well Magazine
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #7 - August 22nd, 2019, 10:15 am
    Post #7 - August 22nd, 2019, 10:15 am Post #7 - August 22nd, 2019, 10:15 am
    pairs4life wrote:Michael Greger and Gene Stone’s How Not to Die Cookbook


    My wife may be Michael Greger's biggest fan. She looks at his site http://www.nutritionfacts.org probably as often as I do this site.

    If Nancy is planning a meal, vs. me, it will frequently be from his 'How Not to Die Cookbook'. If I'm home, I will usually jump in and assist (or takeover :D ) at some point. While I think there are way more hits than misses, if I'm involved we NEVER make his recipes as written. IMO every one is under seasoned (qty and missing ingredients) and many times don't seem to have been written by someone who is a good cook. He also takes the no oil too far for my tastes. If I'm already giving up all animal products I'm not 'sauteing in water', which is what, steaming/boiling?

    To summarize, I recommend the book, but you may want to use the recipes as a starting point and tweak where you feel appropriate. I think these recipes need this more than any other cookbook we have used.

    She has already ordered his new not ready for delivery cook book, 'How Not to Diet'.
  • Post #8 - August 22nd, 2019, 10:29 am
    Post #8 - August 22nd, 2019, 10:29 am Post #8 - August 22nd, 2019, 10:29 am
    Thanks for the recommendations. I will try to check out some books.

    On a side note, I heard that it is not good to eat too much soybean based foods (e.g. tofu) based on recent studies. Is that true? Is tempeh better than tofu?
  • Post #9 - August 22nd, 2019, 10:50 am
    Post #9 - August 22nd, 2019, 10:50 am Post #9 - August 22nd, 2019, 10:50 am
    shorty wrote:On a side note, I heard that it is not good to eat too much soybean based foods (e.g. tofu) based on recent studies. Is that true?

    Seems very unlikely that what may or may not be true for some people would be universally true -- especially when it comes to soy.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #10 - August 22nd, 2019, 1:28 pm
    Post #10 - August 22nd, 2019, 1:28 pm Post #10 - August 22nd, 2019, 1:28 pm
    Pretty sure roundup is universally bad for people... that may just be a rumor.
  • Post #11 - August 22nd, 2019, 2:29 pm
    Post #11 - August 22nd, 2019, 2:29 pm Post #11 - August 22nd, 2019, 2:29 pm
    jaholbrook wrote:Pretty sure roundup is universally bad for people... that may just be a rumor.

    Uranium 235, too. :lol:

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #12 - August 22nd, 2019, 3:49 pm
    Post #12 - August 22nd, 2019, 3:49 pm Post #12 - August 22nd, 2019, 3:49 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    Giovanna wrote:Mark Bittman:

    "Eat food, not too much, mostly plants."

    That quotation was actually Michael Pollan.

    =R=



    Of course it is. I was working from memory, and I should know better :roll: .
    =o=o=o=o=o=o=o=o=o=o=o=

    "Enjoy every sandwich."

    -Warren Zevon
  • Post #13 - August 25th, 2019, 6:31 pm
    Post #13 - August 25th, 2019, 6:31 pm Post #13 - August 25th, 2019, 6:31 pm
    Giovanna wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    Giovanna wrote:Mark Bittman:

    "Eat food, not too much, mostly plants."

    That quotation was actually Michael Pollan.

    =R=



    Of course it is. I was working from memory, and I should know better :roll: .

    I am looking at Mostly Plants right now. I am seeing that it is harder to get a lot of protein from vegetables especially if we don't eat beans.
  • Post #14 - September 12th, 2020, 8:47 pm
    Post #14 - September 12th, 2020, 8:47 pm Post #14 - September 12th, 2020, 8:47 pm
    shorty wrote:Thanks for the recommendations. I will try to check out some books.

    On a side note, I heard that it is not good to eat too much soybean based foods (e.g. tofu) based on recent studies. Is that true? Is tempeh better than tofu?


    Hi- I just found this thread when I searched for Eating Well mentions. I was diagnosed four years ago with breast cancer. I am in remission. The deal with soy is that for people with a history of breast cancer, it is recommended that you not eat processed soy such as veggie dogs. Tofu and green soybeans are just fine. I know a lot of people that have had breast cancer will not eat any soy, but they only need to stay away from processed soy.

    I am really big on the magazine Nutrition Action by Centers for Science in the Public Interest. I know some people here are not fans of them because they consider them the food police. Michael Jacobson has stepped down as the executive director. I am into Mediterranean type diets, and so is CSPI, and I don't eat a lot of red meat because I have a really bad family history of colon cancer, and plus I have a genetic cholesterol problem. When I had my cholesterol tested a month ago, it was up to 255, and yes I am on statin meds. A breast cancer drug I am on also raises my cholesterol, as well as makes it more difficult for me to lose weight. Hope this helps, Nancy
  • Post #15 - September 13th, 2020, 6:23 am
    Post #15 - September 13th, 2020, 6:23 am Post #15 - September 13th, 2020, 6:23 am
    NFriday wrote:
    shorty wrote:Thanks for the recommendations. I will try to check out some books.

    On a side note, I heard that it is not good to eat too much soybean based foods (e.g. tofu) based on recent studies. Is that true? Is tempeh better than tofu?


    Hi- I just found this thread when I searched for Eating Well mentions. I was diagnosed four years ago with breast cancer. I am in remission. The deal with soy is that for people with a history of breast cancer, it is recommended that you not eat processed soy such as veggie dogs. Tofu and green soybeans are just fine. I know a lot of people that have had breast cancer will not eat any soy, but they only need to stay away from processed soy.

    I am really big on the magazine Nutrition Action by Centers for Science in the Public Interest. I know some people here are not fans of them because they consider them the food police. Michael Jacobson has stepped down as the executive director. I am into Mediterranean type diets, and so is CSPI, and I don't eat a lot of red meat because I have a really bad family history of colon cancer, and plus I have a genetic cholesterol problem. When I had my cholesterol tested a month ago, it was up to 255, and yes I am on statin meds. A breast cancer drug I am on also raises my cholesterol, as well as makes it more difficult for me to lose weight. Hope this helps, Nancy

    Nancy, thanks for responding. Last night when I served my family red curry with tofu, I was thinking about the bad press about soybeans. I just read a Mayo Clinic article about the connection between breast cancer and eating soy. It is saying that if you eat soy products in moderation, it should not be a problem.
  • Post #16 - September 13th, 2020, 3:29 pm
    Post #16 - September 13th, 2020, 3:29 pm Post #16 - September 13th, 2020, 3:29 pm
    Here is some succinct text from the Harvard Health website on relatively unprocessed vs highly processed soy products:

    "...some soy products contain estrogen-like chemicals that could have adverse effects. So stay away from soy isoflavone supplements and foods made with textured vegetable protein and soy protein isolate, found in many protein powders and nutrition bars. Still, McManus says it's okay to eat whole soy foods — like soy milk, edamame, and tofu — in moderation, several times per week."
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #17 - September 21st, 2020, 6:02 pm
    Post #17 - September 21st, 2020, 6:02 pm Post #17 - September 21st, 2020, 6:02 pm
    shorty wrote:I am looking at Mostly Plants right now. I am seeing that it is harder to get a lot of protein from vegetables especially if we don't eat beans.


    Try nuts and seeds, they are good for most of us. Also, if you aim for whole grains, and not just white flour, white rice, etc. you will do better, protein-wise. And even if you hate beans, that couldn't include lentils, could it? So delicious!

    But, in general, the average US person does not need as much protein as they eat on a daily basis.

    Some thoughts on protein
    https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/disc ... h-protein/
    Leek

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  • Post #18 - September 21st, 2020, 7:30 pm
    Post #18 - September 21st, 2020, 7:30 pm Post #18 - September 21st, 2020, 7:30 pm
    Also for protein you can eat the following as vegetarian substitutes:
    Quinoa (instead of rice) around 6g protein per serving.
    Dark Leafy Greens like Spinach, Kale, broccoli, etc..
    Chia seed (ground) mixed in a smoothie has about 5g protein per serving.
    Flax seed (ground) mixed in a smoothie has about 3g protein per serving.
  • Post #19 - September 21st, 2020, 8:32 pm
    Post #19 - September 21st, 2020, 8:32 pm Post #19 - September 21st, 2020, 8:32 pm
    leek wrote:
    shorty wrote:I am looking at Mostly Plants right now. I am seeing that it is harder to get a lot of protein from vegetables especially if we don't eat beans.


    Try nuts and seeds, they are good for most of us. Also, if you aim for whole grains, and not just white flour, white rice, etc. you will do better, protein-wise. And even if you hate beans, that couldn't include lentils, could it? So delicious!

    But, in general, the average US person does not need as much protein as they eat on a daily basis.

    Some thoughts on protein
    https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/disc ... h-protein/

    My family has been giving me thumbs down for adding more whole wheat into their diet. They are ok with the brown rice. My kids like vegetables cooked with Indian spices, but I have not figured out how to cook Indian food without my house smelling like Indian food for days. I have a lousy builder quality exhaust fan underneath the microwave. I am not even sure if the air is venting outside.

    The dietician we saw said that trail mix is a good snack. Based on her recommendations, I can see that we are not eating the correct amount of vegetables.
  • Post #20 - September 21st, 2020, 8:41 pm
    Post #20 - September 21st, 2020, 8:41 pm Post #20 - September 21st, 2020, 8:41 pm
    polster wrote:Also for protein you can eat the following as vegetarian substitutes:
    Quinoa (instead of rice) around 6g protein per serving.
    Dark Leafy Greens like Spinach, Kale, broccoli, etc..
    Chia seed (ground) mixed in a smoothie has about 5g protein per serving.
    Flax seed (ground) mixed in a smoothie has about 3g protein per serving.

    I should try out more quinoa recipes until I find one that my family likes. I have a giant Costco sized bag of quinoa in my fridge. (My family didn't really like quinoa).

    I tried making Chía seed pudding, but my family thought it was too wierd.

    Lately, I have been cooking a lot of broccoli, spinach and bok choy.

    I tried mixing flaxseed into oatmeal, but it became gummy. I don't make smoothies since they tend to have fruit juice which makes them high in sugar. I used to use flaxseed as a substitute for some of the butter in recipes.

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