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Corona cuisine / Social distancing cooking
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  • Post #1201 - August 26th, 2020, 10:22 am
    Post #1201 - August 26th, 2020, 10:22 am Post #1201 - August 26th, 2020, 10:22 am
    Hi,

    I use my coffee grinder to make mushroom powder from Shiitake, Boletes and Morels at various times.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #1202 - August 26th, 2020, 10:36 am
    Post #1202 - August 26th, 2020, 10:36 am Post #1202 - August 26th, 2020, 10:36 am
    Cathy2 wrote:Hi,

    I use my coffee grinder to make mushroom powder from Shiitake, Boletes and Morels at various times.

    Since I'm not a coffee drinker, I've never used my coffee grinder for anything other than spices and dried mushrooms, etc. If fact, we refer to it as the spice grinder.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1203 - August 26th, 2020, 10:52 am
    Post #1203 - August 26th, 2020, 10:52 am Post #1203 - August 26th, 2020, 10:52 am
    Cathy2 wrote:Hi,
    I use my coffee grinder to make mushroom powder from Shiitake, Boletes and Morels at various times.


    On a project in Portland I used to dredge diver scallops in porcini dust and sear, then serve around mashed pots w/caramelized onions and sauce w/oxtail-shiitake-marsala ragout. My take on surf and turf.
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #1204 - August 26th, 2020, 6:50 pm
    Post #1204 - August 26th, 2020, 6:50 pm Post #1204 - August 26th, 2020, 6:50 pm
    Without intent, it's turned into Dinner In A Bowl week over here at Chez Suburban . . .

    Image
    Plated Up
    Anson Mills Yellow Polenta (spiked with parmigiano reggiano), topped with sauteed hot Italian Sausage and sauteed cremini mushrooms. Garnished with minced La Quercia prosciutto and chives. Sidecar of leftover baby squash. Delicious and a super easy prep/clean-up, too.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1205 - August 27th, 2020, 7:03 pm
    Post #1205 - August 27th, 2020, 7:03 pm Post #1205 - August 27th, 2020, 7:03 pm
    Burger Night . . .

    Image
    Just Me & Yu :D
    Diced onions and Yu Kurosaki Fujin VG10, 210mm.

    Image
    Griddled Cheeseburger
    American cheese, charcoal-roasted poblanos, homemade pickles, griddled onions, shredded lettuce and assorted condiments. Not pictured was yet another batch of some fairly decent homemade coleslaw. Coronatime has really helped me up my slaw game. :roll:

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1206 - August 27th, 2020, 8:16 pm
    Post #1206 - August 27th, 2020, 8:16 pm Post #1206 - August 27th, 2020, 8:16 pm
    HI,

    Located a pound a Usinger's corned beef in the freezer last night. For lunch today, I made corned beef hash with Russet potatoes, onions and a healthy dose of raspberry wasabi mustard dipping sauce. This jar has been in my fridge for a long time and really I can't explain why I have it. I am glad to now have a lot less.

    I forgot, I also nestled in a few eggs that were pulled when they were loosely set.

    Yep, it is counter intuitive to make such a lunch on one of the hottest days of the year. Of course, it would taste as wonderful on the a cold, snowy day, too.

    No pictures.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #1207 - August 27th, 2020, 8:52 pm
    Post #1207 - August 27th, 2020, 8:52 pm Post #1207 - August 27th, 2020, 8:52 pm
    Lamb should chops, yogurt/lemon/evo/Herbs de Provence, S/P, marinade. Natural lump charcoal. Plus salad and bread = dinner.

    Image
    Image
    Image

    Shoulder Lamb Chops, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1208 - August 27th, 2020, 9:13 pm
    Post #1208 - August 27th, 2020, 9:13 pm Post #1208 - August 27th, 2020, 9:13 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:American cheese, charcoal-roasted poblanos, homemade pickles, griddled onions, shredded lettuce and assorted condiments. Not pictured was yet another batch of some fairly decent homemade coleslaw. Coronatime has really helped me up my slaw game. :roll:

    =R=


    Looks like a perfect cheeseburger to me. What's your homemade coleslaw recipe? I don't have a standard one I stick to, but one trick I found that works well is to salt (or salt and sugar) the cabbage for about an hour in the colander to draw out the moisture, but I'm guessing you probably know that trick. I keep it pretty straightforward and on the sweet side for the family, as they like it that way, just using Duke's mayo, sugar, salt, pepper, celery seed, and a bit of vinegar. (I personally like it acidic, minimal sugar, no mayo, but that's not what the family prefers.)

    I got no pix today, but the little one asked for meatballs, so we made some meatballs (50-50 ground chuck:Italian sausage + binders, cheese and a little extra herbage) and I rolled out some pappardelle (400 g flour, 4 large eggs, plus a little extra water using judgment as the dough felt a little bit off/too dry.) Simple sauce with tomatoes, garlic, olive oil, salt, oregano, and we're good to go.
  • Post #1209 - August 28th, 2020, 10:46 am
    Post #1209 - August 28th, 2020, 10:46 am Post #1209 - August 28th, 2020, 10:46 am
    Binko wrote:What's your homemade coleslaw recipe? I don't have a standard one I stick to, but one trick I found that works well is to salt (or salt and sugar) the cabbage for about an hour in the colander to draw out the moisture, but I'm guessing you probably know that trick. I keep it pretty straightforward and on the sweet side for the family, as they like it that way, just using Duke's mayo, sugar, salt, pepper, celery seed, and a bit of vinegar. (I personally like it acidic, minimal sugar, no mayo, but that's not what the family prefers.)

    I typically salt but have never sugared. But I don't like it too sweet. To paraphrase Miles Davis, my "recipe" is just a bitch's brew, lol. I don't think I've ever made it the same way twice. I make a dressing that usually consists of mayo (sometimes more than one kind), buttermilk, vinegar (most often apple cider), grated sweet onion, mustard (often yellow) and a touch of honey (goes into solution easier than sugar and imparts more flavor). I sometimes add homemade pickle juice. Seasoning is always black pepper and salt, if necessary. I sometimes add cracked mustard seeds, poppy seeds and/or celery seeds. And it's become habit to add a carrot or two into the mix -- I use the vegetable peeler for this -- but that's mostly for aesthetics.

    Binko wrote:I got no pix today, but the little one asked for meatballs, so we made some meatballs (50-50 ground chuck:Italian sausage + binders, cheese and a little extra herbage) and I rolled out some pappardelle (400 g flour, 4 large eggs, plus a little extra water using judgment as the dough felt a little bit off/too dry.) Simple sauce with tomatoes, garlic, olive oil, salt, oregano, and we're good to go.

    Do you pre-cook your meatballs? If so, how?

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1210 - August 28th, 2020, 6:54 pm
    Post #1210 - August 28th, 2020, 6:54 pm Post #1210 - August 28th, 2020, 6:54 pm
    Super simple dinner tonight . . .

    Image
    A little more me & Yu time :D
    Shallots and Yu Kurosaki Sasame Petty, 120mm

    Image
    Plated Up
    Pan-Seared wild King Salmon (with shallot-dijon pan sauce), leftover caviar lentils and the last of the leftover baby squash (finally!). :D

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1211 - August 28th, 2020, 7:20 pm
    Post #1211 - August 28th, 2020, 7:20 pm Post #1211 - August 28th, 2020, 7:20 pm
    ok Ronnie I know you are a fabulous cook with stellar knives. but what i want to know more about is about your undying loyalty to Topo Chico. why is it the one for you?
  • Post #1212 - August 28th, 2020, 11:28 pm
    Post #1212 - August 28th, 2020, 11:28 pm Post #1212 - August 28th, 2020, 11:28 pm
    annak wrote:ok Ronnie I know you are a fabulous cook with stellar knives. but what i want to know more about is about your undying loyalty to Topo Chico. why is it the one for you?

    Haha! I wouldn't call it undying loyalty but even though it's now owned by Coca Cola, I do loves me some Topo Chico. The bottom line is that the flavor, the salinity and -- most of all -- the fairly fierce level of carbonation are a perfect match for me. The first time I had it was in 2005 when I and a bunch of friends went to Hill Country for a long weekend/BBQ tour. Many of the places we hit -- and we hit 18 in 3 days -- served Topo Chico. I felt like it was the perfect elixir for BBQ. There were times (many, actually) when I was totally stuffed and thought I was done but a Topo came to the rescue and helped revive and re-energize me. So, not only did it do me right in crunch time but because the trip was great, I developed something of a sentimental connection with it.

    Sometime after the pandemic started, I realized that it was in a lot of the shots I was posting, which makes sense because I have a Topo with dinner every night. So, I decided to keep including it. Funny thing is, as much as I enjoy it, I almost never have more than one a day. I don't drink pop at all and I don't drink caffeine, either. Occasionally I'll have a beer or wine with dinner, depending on what we're eating. So, it's basically water all day, bourbon and/or mezcal every so often (though, that's been rare during coronatime) and -- unless something really weird is going on -- I have one Topo Chico, with dinner, every day. On rare occasions I'll have some other kind of bubbly water but I don't really like any pre-flavored stuff, so that leaves me, happily, with my daily Topo.

    Aren't you glad you asked, lol?! :D

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1213 - August 29th, 2020, 7:32 am
    Post #1213 - August 29th, 2020, 7:32 am Post #1213 - August 29th, 2020, 7:32 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:and -- most of all -- the fairly fierce level of carbonation

    Carbonation, Topo is all about the aggressive carbonation for me. Unlike Ronnie, whose palate is as precise as the Hubble Telescope, I like Le Croix, Bubbely, Diet Dr. Pepper, Dr. Brown, the occasional glass bottle Mexican coke etc.

    I try to drink more Topo or sparkling water than soda as they contain less or no extras. Gone are the days where I'm pounding a 12-pack of ice cold Blatz with my 2x Hungry Man meals.
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1214 - August 29th, 2020, 8:33 pm
    Post #1214 - August 29th, 2020, 8:33 pm Post #1214 - August 29th, 2020, 8:33 pm
    First-ever attempt at alkaline noodles went really well. Started by making soda ash by baking some baking soda for an hour at 250F. After that, it was mostly hard labor to the finish line . . .

    Image
    Rolled Dough
    Semolina flour, soda ash, salt and water . . . and a lot of elbow grease, as the dough was quite elastic.

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    Cut Noodles & Tanaka Ginsan Nashiji Petty, ebony, 120mm
    Once rolled, the dough is gently folded and cut into strips to form the noodles.

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    Unfolded Noodles
    Once cut, the noodles are unfolded and are ready for a brief boil in unsalted water for about 3 minutes. After that, they're placed in cold water (to stop the cooking), drained and mixed with a small amount of oil to prevent them from sticking or clumping. Meanwhile, the noodle water is removed from the heat and -- in this case -- raw shrimp are dunked in the water to par-cook them for two minutes.

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    Semolina Alkaline Noodles With Shrimp
    The rest of the prep is fairly rapid-fire and very straightforward. Minced garlic and red chiles go into a hot wok with a splash of oil until fragrant. They're followed by some thinly sliced onions and then the noodles. After that, a few sauces (fish, soy, oyster) are added, followed by the shrimp, some scallions and sesame seeds. Remove from heat, add a few dashes of toasted sesame oil and it's ready to serve. This was a delicious dish, especially the noodles, which were satisfyingly chewy. For a first attempt at the noodles, I was quite pleased.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1215 - August 30th, 2020, 1:13 pm
    Post #1215 - August 30th, 2020, 1:13 pm Post #1215 - August 30th, 2020, 1:13 pm
    Kudos to you Ronnie for trying alkaline noodles. Have you a link to a recipe or a video? IIRC, Woks of Life have featured them recently. I've fooled around off and on for a couple of years with Asian noodles, and have had some success with biang-biang. I've thought about using my Italian hand-cranked machine for alkaline noodles, but never quite had the guts to do it. I guess I should follow your lead and "just DO it!"

    Here's my fave biang-biang lead:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-DUwj87FR6A

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #1216 - August 30th, 2020, 4:24 pm
    Post #1216 - August 30th, 2020, 4:24 pm Post #1216 - August 30th, 2020, 4:24 pm
    Geo wrote:Kudos to you Ronnie for trying alkaline noodles. Have you a link to a recipe or a video? IIRC, Woks of Life have featured them recently. I've fooled around off and on for a couple of years with Asian noodles, and have had some success with biang-biang. I've thought about using my Italian hand-cranked machine for alkaline noodles, but never quite had the guts to do it. I guess I should follow your lead and "just DO it!"

    Here's my fave biang-biang lead:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-DUwj87FR6A

    Thanks, for the link. I actually made noodles two ways. The first, shown in my post above, is from Harold McGee's recipe at NYT.com, (which calls for a pasta roller, btw) and the second, which I also mixed yesterday -- and will roll and cook tonight -- is this recipe/method at Magic Ingredients on youtube. Other than being a little bit intimidated by making the soda ash, the only hard part was the laborious task of rolling the noodles. And that was only as difficult as it was because I was too lazy to find my pasta machine, so it could have been even easier.

    Speaking of youtube, this morning, I was back on the Refika trail, making Menemen, which is, more or less, a Turkish take on Shakshouka . . .

    The recipe starts with mild green peppers. I didn't have any but I had some lovely yellow peppers from our Nichols Farm CSA box, and I threw in a serrano just because . . .

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    Peppers & Konosuke HD Western, 210 mm
    I love that I could the peppers skin-side-up with this knife and it was like they weren't even there.

    Image
    Peppers and Browned Butter
    Refika specifies browning the butter, so alrighty then! :)

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    Tomatoes
    2 tomatoes. Refika specifies peeling them but I was in no mood for that, so I left them unpeeled, which seemed to work out just fine.

    Image
    Meats
    Refika's recipe calls for two meats that would be pretty tough to find locally: sucuk and pastirma. Not having either of those on hand, I went with my homemade kurobuta bacon, La Quercia nduja and a slab leftover thick-cut corned beef.

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    Tomatoes and Peppers Cooking
    These items are cooked with the lid on over low heat for 6-8 minutes or until they're soft.

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    Mashing
    Once softened, a potato masher is used on the tomatoes and peppers.

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    Cheese
    Not having the recommended kaşar cheese on hand, I used a blend of queso fresco, mozzarella and cotija. At this stage, only a small portion of the cheese is added, and it's mixed in thoroughly.

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    Adding The Meats
    Next up, the meats are added and stirred about until warmed and incorporated. This is probably the biggest departure from what I would have done if I were making this on my own. I would have started with the meats, to put some color on them and render some fat for cooking all that followed. How doing this Refika's way differed from what I would have done, I cannot say but, spoiler alert, it was delicious! :)

    Image
    Adding The Eggs
    Unlike with shakshouka, the eggs are added and fully mixed into the dish rather than allowed to cook atop it. Once the eggs are mixed in, a bunch more cheese and some red pepper flakes (I used Aleppo) go atop the dish and it's covered again. When the cheese has melted, it's ready to serve.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Menemen (mostly) Refika's way with toasted PQM sourdough boule.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1217 - August 31st, 2020, 1:35 am
    Post #1217 - August 31st, 2020, 1:35 am Post #1217 - August 31st, 2020, 1:35 am
    My best friends are pan fried noodles.

    Image
    Image

    PFN, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1218 - August 31st, 2020, 2:30 pm
    Post #1218 - August 31st, 2020, 2:30 pm Post #1218 - August 31st, 2020, 2:30 pm
    G Wiv wrote:PFN, count me a Fan!

    Absolutely. They look delicious. What noodles did you start with? What was the cooking process?

    ronnie_suburban wrote:I actually made noodles two ways. The first, shown in my post above, is from Harold McGee's recipe at NYT.com, (which calls for a pasta roller, btw) and the second, which I also mixed yesterday -- and will roll and cook tonight -- is this recipe/method at Magic Ingredients on youtube.

    Took the second pass at alkaline noodles on Sunday (with the Magic Ingredient dough made on Saturday) and thought the results were different enough from Round 1 that I'll have to carefully consider which way to go next.

    The McGee recipe calls for 250g of semolina flour, 38% water (though I had to use more) and 2% soda ash. The M.I. recipe calls for 340g all purpose flour, 44% water and .02% soda ash. Salt was basically to taste in both recipes. The flavor and texture of the semolina noodles was better but I wonder if I could have achieved equally good results using even less soda ash. On the plus side for M.I., the dough was much easier to knead and to roll. Those noodles were a little less chewy than the semolina noodles but again, I wonder if I could have achieved chewier noodles by upping the amount of soda ash just a bit. Again, if I'd had my pasta roller, both types of noodles would have probably been far easier to roll and cut.

    Image
    Rolling The Dough
    This AP flour dough rolled out nicely and easily.

    Image
    Cut Noodles & Konosuke HD Petty, 210mm
    Kind of an oddball knife but given its length, thinness and slight belly, a good one for this particular task.

    Image
    Unfolded Noodles
    Being a finer and more supple dough, these were a bit harder to unfold than the semolina noodles, though I wouldn't describe the process as problematic in any way.

    Image
    Mise
    Everything except for the toasted sesame oil, which goes in at the very end, after the wok has been removed from the heat.

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    Boiling Noodles
    Well, not quite but these were in and out of the water in 3 minutes, probably hitting a boil for the final 90 seconds or so.

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    Aromatics
    Garlic, red hot chile and onions in a dash of peanut oil.

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    Noodles & Sauces
    After the aromatics do their thing, the noodles, then sauces are added to the hot wok.

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    Shrimp & Scallions
    Once the noodles are fully coated with the sauces and take on a little color, the par-cooked shrimp (2 minutes in the hot noodle water after the noodles are removed) and scallions are added and stirred about just until the scallions start to wilt. After that, the wok's removed from the heat and a few drops of toasted sesame oil are stirred in.

    Image
    Plated Up
    AP Flour Alkaline Noodle Stir Fry with Shrimp & Scallions.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1219 - August 31st, 2020, 5:08 pm
    Post #1219 - August 31st, 2020, 5:08 pm Post #1219 - August 31st, 2020, 5:08 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Absolutely. They look delicious. What noodles did you start with? What was the cooking process?

    I can tell you its a hell of a lot simpler than your 34-step method. Starting with baking baking soda is somewhat akin to wanting to know the time and start with mining the sapphire for the watch crystal. :)

    Looks amazing! Though you efforts typically look, taste, smell, sound grand.

    While my method is not quite microwave its not rocket surgery either. Start with fresh Chinese egg noodles, lo mein/chow mein /thin wonton noodles/Hong Kong/pan-fried noodles in a package. I also make these with chow fun/rice noodle.

    Noodle, long as its fresh, matters less than technique. You can also use lightly boiled dry noodles, most types of Chinese or even Italian. Yes, sure, put a little baking soda in the water for extra chew if you are so inclined. I don't.

    Bring lightly salted water to boil, no C2, I don't know how long that will take. :)
    Blanch Fresh noodles.
    Drain, rinse with cold water to stop cooking.
    Big bowl, little neutral oil.
    Med heat burner
    Plop in a largish oiled pan, wok, non-stick, carbon steel, any type of pan.
    Spread noodles out in pancake form.
    Patience is Key, don't futz with for 5-6 minutes. If browning too fast turn down heat.
    Flip, patience once again.
    Flip, patience once again.
    Done when you run out of patience.

    I sometimes add scallion, sesame seeds, kosher salt. Not a lot of stuff though, its a crispy neutral side, not a main dish. Cheese would incur the wrath of Uncle Rodger.

    I feel like above is like telling Ronnie how to turn on a car radio, might help someone else with a less developed skill set though.

    Pan fried noodles, count me a fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1220 - August 31st, 2020, 7:13 pm
    Post #1220 - August 31st, 2020, 7:13 pm Post #1220 - August 31st, 2020, 7:13 pm
    G Wiv wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Absolutely. They look delicious. What noodles did you start with? What was the cooking process?

    I can tell you its a hell of a lot simpler than your 34-step method. Starting with baking baking soda is somewhat akin to wanting to know the time and start with mining the sapphire for the watch crystal. :)

    LOL . . . the noodles were only 4 ingredients! :lol: That one of them required some advance prep was not that big a deal. It was the rolling that took some time. Do you have a brand (or brands) of noodles you prefer?

    Tonight's dinner was very easy but was also one of those looks more delicious than it really was affairs . . .

    Image
    Shallots & Konosuke Togatta GS, 240mm
    This was definitely not a fair fight. Knife overkill for sure, especially for one shallot and a few mini tomatoes.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Wild and extremely dry pan-seared coho salmon (wtf Sitka?) with a shallot and mini-tomato pan sauce (that broke), leftover conehead cabbage coleslaw and instant-potted esquites. Even though I only cooked it to 115F internal, the fish was so dry, it needed the sauce (which at least tasted good) to keep it from being a choking hazard. By the time it was sauced enough to be edible, it could have been any protein under there. Slaw was fine. Esquites were okay but I think the corn might have frozen a little in the back of the fridge. Hey, they can't all be winners, right? :wink:

    Happy Monday! :)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1221 - September 1st, 2020, 8:03 am
    Post #1221 - September 1st, 2020, 8:03 am Post #1221 - September 1st, 2020, 8:03 am
    Ronnie, I've been enjoying the knife porn. I'm way behind on that score but I've recently started getting some decent knives. They're shy though, it'll be a while before I'll be posting photos :)

    Speaking of new toys, I bought myself an early 50th birthday present and inaugurated it on Sunday with tacos arabes

    Image

    I made way too much of the chipotle salsa but I can also think of a half-dozen other things I'd use it with. It's essentially the spicier-and-less-sweet BBQ sauce of my dreams.

    Image

    My family's annual hog roast is canceled this year on account of plague, so this Sunday I'll be making tacos al pastor for my immediate family instead of cooking hundreds of pounds of pig.
    Ronnie said I should probably tell you guys about my website so

    Hey I have a website.
    http://www.sandwichtribunal.com
  • Post #1222 - September 1st, 2020, 8:04 am
    Post #1222 - September 1st, 2020, 8:04 am Post #1222 - September 1st, 2020, 8:04 am
    Super lazy, easy supper yesterday. Browned up a pound and a half of pork stew meat, dumped it in the crock pot. Poured about 12 ounces of El Mexicano Salsa Verde over the meat. Turned it on high and cooked for 3-4 hours. Shredded the meat, tossed it back in the skillet to crisp up some bits, added in the cooking sauce from the crockpot (skimmed the slight bit of fat from the top) and stirred. Served the meat in El Milagro corn tortillas topped with queso fresco, chopped onions and avocado slices. Corn on the cob on the side. Unfancy and completely delicious.
    -Mary
  • Post #1223 - September 1st, 2020, 8:12 am
    Post #1223 - September 1st, 2020, 8:12 am Post #1223 - September 1st, 2020, 8:12 am
    The GP wrote:Super lazy, easy supper yesterday. Browned up a pound and a half of pork stew meat, dumped it in the crock pot. Poured about 12 ounces of El Mexicano Salsa Verde over the meat.


    El Mexicano Salsa Verde is an arrow in my quiver, though I typically use Herdez brand. Couple of two tree jars over a bunch of chicken leg quarters, oven, tortillas etc, great easy dinner!

    The GP wrote:Unfancy and completely delicious.

    I would guess that is 1000% true! Though your "unfancy" might be another persons 20-year anniversary dinner. :)
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1224 - September 1st, 2020, 8:58 am
    Post #1224 - September 1st, 2020, 8:58 am Post #1224 - September 1st, 2020, 8:58 am
    G Wiv wrote:
    The GP wrote:Super lazy, easy supper yesterday. Browned up a pound and a half of pork stew meat, dumped it in the crock pot. Poured about 12 ounces of El Mexicano Salsa Verde over the meat.


    El Mexicano Salsa Verde is an arrow in my quiver, though I typically use Herdez brand. Couple of two tree jars over a bunch of chicken leg quarters, oven, tortillas etc, great easy dinner!

    The GP wrote:Unfancy and completely delicious.

    I would guess that is 1000% true! Though your "unfancy" might be another persons 20-year anniversary dinner. :)

    True. I've made my own salsa verde but the extra work was not desirable. I'll totally do this again, but might gussy it up with some pickled onions.
    -Mary
  • Post #1225 - September 1st, 2020, 9:09 am
    Post #1225 - September 1st, 2020, 9:09 am Post #1225 - September 1st, 2020, 9:09 am
    I make my own salsa verde because I get a lot of free tomatillos from the produce rescue. When I make it, I make a gallon and freeze it in pint containers.

    I have tried buying it but most of the commercial ones are two hot for the people that I cook for.
  • Post #1226 - September 1st, 2020, 9:17 am
    Post #1226 - September 1st, 2020, 9:17 am Post #1226 - September 1st, 2020, 9:17 am
    JimTheBeerGuy wrote:Speaking of new toys, I bought myself an early 50th birthday present and inaugurated it on Sunday with tacos arabes

    Image

    That is awesome. Looks delicious! Happy birthday, Jim! :)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1227 - September 1st, 2020, 10:49 am
    Post #1227 - September 1st, 2020, 10:49 am Post #1227 - September 1st, 2020, 10:49 am
    Wow, Jim, that is *awesome*!! Where's it from? and how'd you build the 'gyro'??

    Geo

    PS. Happy B'day, too!
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #1228 - September 1st, 2020, 11:02 am
    Post #1228 - September 1st, 2020, 11:02 am Post #1228 - September 1st, 2020, 11:02 am
    Finally got all the ingredients for anticuchos. The marinade is absolutely addicting, I can see using it on everything from chicken thighs to grilled salmon. Didn't have a beef heart, so I went with pork. Got the aji sauce from Amazon. Delicious.

    Geo

    https://perudelights.com/anticuchos-cows-heart-kebabs-flavor-on-a-stick/
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #1229 - September 1st, 2020, 11:36 am
    Post #1229 - September 1st, 2020, 11:36 am Post #1229 - September 1st, 2020, 11:36 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:That is awesome. Looks delicious! Happy birthday, Jim! :)


    Thanks, birthday wishes are a little premature, as was the self-gift. I gotta get through a few weeks to the end of the month yet.

    Wow, Jim, that is *awesome*!! Where's it from? and how'd you build the 'gyro'??


    I bought it on Amazon, the brand is Zz Pro and I may have inadvertently pushed Bezos over the 200 Billion mark :( As for how I built it, clumsily, but I think practice will make perfect.
    Ronnie said I should probably tell you guys about my website so

    Hey I have a website.
    http://www.sandwichtribunal.com
  • Post #1230 - September 1st, 2020, 5:57 pm
    Post #1230 - September 1st, 2020, 5:57 pm Post #1230 - September 1st, 2020, 5:57 pm
    Image
    Simple 1 pot dinner tonight.

    Peel shrimp. Add 1 tsp kosher salt and 1/4 tsp baking soda and let sit for 1 hour.

    Fine chop 1 chipotle chili in Adobo and add a little sauce. Fine chop couple cloves of garlic and fine slice a large shallot. Put a TBSP of olive oil in a pot and saute chipotle, sauce, garlic and shallot for a minute. Add rice and cook for a minute. Add stock, bring to a boil and simmer for 15 minutes. Add shrimp and turn off heat and let sit for 15 minutes. Add cilantro and stir everything together and serve.

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