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Corona cuisine / Social distancing cooking

Corona cuisine / Social distancing cooking
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  • Post #1231 - September 1st, 2020, 7:12 pm
    Post #1231 - September 1st, 2020, 7:12 pm Post #1231 - September 1st, 2020, 7:12 pm
    Working our way through an absolutely stellar box of provisions from Publican Quality Meats, tonight we grilled up four burger patties from Slagel Family Farm and two pork chops, the provenance of which were unknown . . .

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    Slagel Burger Patties
    Really, just gorgeous meat.

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    Grilling
    At the Weber, finishing everything up.

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    Grilled Meats
    Ready for service.

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    Plated Up
    I went for a cheeseburger, served here with tomatoey-garlicky green beans and conehead cabbage coleslaw.

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    Plated Up
    This is the pork chop option (chosen by my son but briefly moved to my plate for the pic) also with tomatoey-garlicky green beans and conehead cabbage coleslaw. I tried the chop and it was good but a bit tough in the lean sections. I'm not sure what breed of hog it was. There was lots fat around the exterior of the chop but not a lot of marbling in the meaty section. Either way, some great stuff here. I'll try to document some of the other items that were in this box in future posts.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1232 - September 3rd, 2020, 6:39 pm
    Post #1232 - September 3rd, 2020, 6:39 pm Post #1232 - September 3rd, 2020, 6:39 pm
    Got our hands on some secretos, which I've most often heard described as pork skirt steaks. They're pretty similar to their beef counterparts in appearance and texture . . .

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    Secretos
    Salt and pepper. I trimmed these a bit and they were still really fatty. I would have loved to have taken a picture of the 2-foot flames that flared up when these were directly over the coals on my Weber. Instead, I though it'd be a better use of my time moving the steaks and effectively extinguishing the fire. ;)

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    Plated Up
    Secreto with conehead cabbage coleslaw (still?!) and leftover beans and creamed spinach from yesterday's carry-out dinner from Prairie Grass Cafe (my friends' restaurant). This was a really nice dinner, especially the PGC leftovers. I miss eating at restaurants. :(

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1233 - September 5th, 2020, 8:01 pm
    Post #1233 - September 5th, 2020, 8:01 pm Post #1233 - September 5th, 2020, 8:01 pm
    Light dinner tonight. Honeydew melon, fig, burrata, prosciutto, evo, basil. Chased with a glass of fresh made cantaloupe juice. (I'm on a melon juice kick)

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    Melon juice, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1234 - September 5th, 2020, 9:43 pm
    Post #1234 - September 5th, 2020, 9:43 pm Post #1234 - September 5th, 2020, 9:43 pm
    G Wiv wrote:Melon juice, count me a Fan!

    Very nice. Do you have a juicer or do you just puree them in the blender? I've been getting an influx of melons lately and making juice seems like a nice option.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1235 - September 5th, 2020, 11:19 pm
    Post #1235 - September 5th, 2020, 11:19 pm Post #1235 - September 5th, 2020, 11:19 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Very nice. Do you have a juicer or do you just puree them in the blender?

    Pureed in Vitamix.

    So far, I've made watermelon, honeydew, cantaloupe. I've also made combos including melon and one or more of peach, plum, nectarine. Basically, just blend the hell out of the fruit. Taste for flavor, sweet, bitter, consistency. I typically add a bit of water to help blend but have also gone with seltzer, Gatorade, cranberry juice, orange juice and, you get the idea.

    I've been adding lemon, lime or both to the blending mix. Taste first.

    I make at least a two-quart batch, I don't dilute it much, just enough to help blending. That way it stores easier, just add water on consumption. If making a small batch to drink on the spot I blend in ice. I have found the melon, fruit juice tastes better the next day. right off the bat there can be slightly bitter discordant flavors that seem to dissipate overnight. The flavor, as well as consistency, seem smoother after a rest as well.

    Don't over sweeten initially, it’s easy to add sugar, honey, palm sugar, simple syrup, agave syrup etc. Impossible to take out without diluting the mix.

    To drink pour juice over lots of ice. Add, to taste, lemon, lime juice, or both. Something sweet if needed, water with or without gas, if needed.

    It’s hard to screw up fruit juice. If you really tank a batch just add more ice and booze. :)

    Once can also add yogurt (lassi), milk, condensed milk which veer the drink off in a slightly, albeit tasty, direction.
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1236 - September 6th, 2020, 4:35 pm
    Post #1236 - September 6th, 2020, 4:35 pm Post #1236 - September 6th, 2020, 4:35 pm
    Had a taste for a Philly Maki roll, so rolled my own. Just can not get the hang of rolling maki, maki moron so to speak. Damn tasty, and hit the spot, but ugly with a capitol U.

    Bride went traditional bialy from New York Bagel and Bialy (Touhy), lox, cream cheese, onion, tomato.

    Click on image to enlarge
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    Philly Maki roll, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1237 - September 6th, 2020, 4:38 pm
    Post #1237 - September 6th, 2020, 4:38 pm Post #1237 - September 6th, 2020, 4:38 pm
    don't know about you guys but quarantine cooking is weighing on me; inspiration lagging. i miss restaurants! i love cooking, but regular trips to ambitious eateries always gave me ideas and goals for the home kitchen.

    tonight we're having tots-n-brats. nothing special, though cheddar brats from whole foods counter at kingsbury are pretty good, especially on a pretzel bun; tater tots are hilarious; and we'll balance things out with steamed broccoli and sliced pluots.
  • Post #1238 - September 6th, 2020, 4:39 pm
    Post #1238 - September 6th, 2020, 4:39 pm Post #1238 - September 6th, 2020, 4:39 pm
    annak wrote:don't know about you guys but quarantine cooking is weighing on me;

    I'm so sick of my own cooking I had a Burger King whopper the other nite. 1st in decades.
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #1239 - September 6th, 2020, 11:26 pm
    Post #1239 - September 6th, 2020, 11:26 pm Post #1239 - September 6th, 2020, 11:26 pm
    Jazzfood wrote:
    annak wrote:don't know about you guys but quarantine cooking is weighing on me;

    I'm so sick of my own cooking I had a Burger King whopper the other nite. 1st in decades.

    LOL! Knowing you as I do, that speaks volumes.

    Not that I haven't worked in some carry-out and fast food over the past 6 months but I'm finally beginning to miss eating at some of my favorite restaurants. However, there's not much I can do about that right now. On the flipside, I'm still really enjoying cooking, which has become a hobby and therapy all at once. I've tried to make the best of the situation by learning to cook dozens of things (many documented here) that I've never tried before. It can sometimes be a bit of work, especially the first time through, when it can also be time-consuming. But the rewards are there, particularly when my family really gets into what I've cooked. There are just 3 of us but my wife is an avid accomplice and my son, who's 23, isn't at all squeamish. So, it's a lot easier than it would be if I had young children or picky eaters to feed.

    Youtube has been a virtually unlimited source of inspiration. Case in point are the Shrimp Vegetable Rolls from Magic Ingredients that I attempted to riff on recently. They were time-consuming and things didn't go 100% according to plan. Still, they were delicious and I learned a few things I can take away for the future from having done it . . .

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    Mise En Place
    Diced Shrimp
    (shrimp, white pepper, grated ginger, soy sauce, corn starch, peanut oil)
    Dipping Sauce
    (scallion greens, crushed garlic, red chili flakes, sesame seeds, salt, hot peanut oil, Chinese vinegar, soy sauce, toasted sesame oil, granulated sugar, water)
    Scrambled Eggs
    (eggs, salt, canola oil)
    Scallions
    (scallions, baking soda, peanut oil)
    Sauteed Mushrooms
    (sliced creminis, Chinese cooking wine, Chinese vinegar, crushed garlic, 5-Spice Powder)

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    Rolled Out Dough
    With oil added, this was a very stretchy dough.

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    Nearly Transparent Dough
    Got it very thin (just like in the video, I thought) . . . maybe a bit too thin. :roll:

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    Placing The Fillings
    The "original" recipe did not include the mushrooms but I had some on hand and decided to include them. It may have caused problems later. Even though I sauteed them and removed most of their moisture, they still may have imparted some unwanted moisture to the dish. Also, their very presence meant that I was likely to have an overfilled roll, since I didn't really cut anything else back.

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    Rolling Up The Roll
    The dough was very elastic but still stuck to the board in a few places, in spite of keeping it floured. I was still able to roll it all up.

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    Rolled Up Roll
    At this point, it looked so much like the one from the youtube video I was beside myself. A classic case of celebrating too early. :wink:

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    Steamer Improvisation
    This was not the right steamer for the job but it was all I had and it did a decent job even though it was too small (even after removing the wire handles to maximize its capacity). The woman in the video used a towel, just like what is shown here. That was another misstep (for me), as it led to a bit of sticking after the steaming. I had both cabbage and parchment paper on hand but in the heat of the moment, neither came to mind. D'oh!!

    After 15 minutes in the steamer, the roll was "done." Clearly, the wrapper was too thin and the roll was overfilled (to paraphrase Tom Petty, Damn The Mushrooms!). This led to it breaking in a few places and, as I mentioned above, sticking to the towel a bit. With a bit of patience I was able to separate it from the towel without creating much more damage.

    From the beginning I'd envisioned going my own way at the end and pan-frying the roll to get it crispy (not done in the video), so that's what I did. I managed to get the roll into a hot pan with some peanut oil, flipped over and out on the pan without doing too much damage but clearly, there was some.

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    Plated Up
    Shrimp Vegetable Roll, steamed and pan-fried. There's some breakage but I have to say that in spite of that, this was really delicious. The sauce alone is something I'll definitely be making again in the future. It'll be great on mid-range Chinese delivery. But there was a lot more to take away, too. The flavors were great and these were ingredients I never would have thought to combine in this way. Some lessons learned, for sure.

    The recipe actually makes 2 dough balls and I still have the second one in reserve. So, I might take another stab at this in the next couple of days, but I'll be sure to not overfill if I do. :)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1240 - September 7th, 2020, 3:33 am
    Post #1240 - September 7th, 2020, 3:33 am Post #1240 - September 7th, 2020, 3:33 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Rolling Up The Roll
    The dough was very elastic but still stuck to the board in a few places, in spite of keeping it floured. I was still able to roll it all up.

    Looks delicious, love the pan fry spin on the dish. I dig watching Magic Ingredients, she cooks good looking and delicious food. I've made three or four of her recipes.

    Aside from, as you say, overfilling, a common theme with me including the maki rolls I made yesterday lunch, I wonder if the water in the dough should have been boiled or at least warm, i.e. hot water dough. This would give greater elasticity, pull and tension strength. Her video or recipe text did not specify but in translation it would be easy to leave a detail like that out.

    Water in the video did not look hot/boiling, and this is just a thought. Once again, looks delicious, great first effort on the dish.
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1241 - September 7th, 2020, 2:28 pm
    Post #1241 - September 7th, 2020, 2:28 pm Post #1241 - September 7th, 2020, 2:28 pm
    G Wiv wrote:Water in the video did not look hot/boiling, and this is just a thought. Once again, looks delicious, great first effort on the dish.

    Thanks. I think you're right that hot water might have helped and that it didn't seem like something she did in the video. In the end, though, the mushrooms added some moisture and some bulk, neither of which helped maintain structural integrity. I'll definitely take another stab at this but it'll be after I acquire a proper bamboo steamer basket.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1242 - September 7th, 2020, 6:19 pm
    Post #1242 - September 7th, 2020, 6:19 pm Post #1242 - September 7th, 2020, 6:19 pm
    With apologies to the purists once again, it was Fried (riced) Cauliflower over here tonight . . .

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    Mise En Place
    Cleaning out the fridge a little bit by using some leftover smoked sausage and sauteed mushrooms, along with scallions (2 ways), carrots and peas from the produce drawer, plus some other business.

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    Fried (riced) Cauliflower with Shrimp
    A heaping, steaming bowl. That looks good but what are you gonna have? :P

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    Plated Up
    My serving . . . complete with a generous drizzle of G Wiv-recipe chili oil. :)

    Happy Monday! :)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1243 - September 8th, 2020, 8:20 pm
    Post #1243 - September 8th, 2020, 8:20 pm Post #1243 - September 8th, 2020, 8:20 pm
    Had some cremini mushrooms I needed to use up and decided to try something new (for me) . . .

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    Shallots & Kurosaki R2 Hammered Gyuto, 210mm
    Probably about a dozen shallots. They'll be nearing 'use it or lose it' time soon but were still in good shape tonight.

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    Sauteed Creminis & Shallots
    I sauteed each of these separately. I actually flambe'd the mushrooms with brandy. That was fun and scary -- for a moment -- until the flames subsided.

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    Filling The Lined Loaf Pan
    In the end, it was about 2 pounds of sliced, sauteed & brandy-flambe'd mushrooms and 12 minced & sauteed shallots, combined with a mixture of half & half, beaten eggs and dijon mustard.

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    Bain Marie
    My bain marie is actually a pan I often use to catch drippings in my smoker but it worked well here. I guessed 80 minutes @ 300F (poked it after 60) and that worked out just about right.

    I put the terrine in early because I wanted it to have plenty of time to set after it cooked. While it cooked, I got a roast ready and into the oven . . .

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    Bone-In Berkshire Pork Roast
    Oiled, seasoned, racked and ready for roasting. 325F for just over two hours.

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    Weighing The Terrine Down
    After the terrine had cooked, I cut a piece of cardboard, wrapped it in foil and plastic and used it -- along with some other handy kitchen items -- to help compress it just a bit.

    As the terrine set, the roast finished . . .

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    Roasted Pork
    I cooked it to about 140 internal, since I knew there'd be carry-over. It rested for about 20 minutes before the internal temperature reached 152F and began to drop.

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    Terrine Unmolded
    Jiggly but firm enough to handle. Beginner's luck.

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    Mushroom Terrine
    On a bed of fading greens dressed with evoo and red wine vinegar.

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    Mushroom Terrine & Lightly Dressed Greens, Pork Roast

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1244 - September 8th, 2020, 11:08 pm
    Post #1244 - September 8th, 2020, 11:08 pm Post #1244 - September 8th, 2020, 11:08 pm
    simply beautiful
    Being gauche rocks, stun the bourgeoisie
  • Post #1245 - September 9th, 2020, 8:05 am
    Post #1245 - September 9th, 2020, 8:05 am Post #1245 - September 9th, 2020, 8:05 am
    A cool night meant something warm from the oven. It was a toss-up between the tomato-corn pie or stuffed eggplant parmesan from the Smitten Kitchen website. Mr. X has been in charge of the tomato-corn pie and he wasn't in the mood to cook so eggplant it was! Tasty results even without the breadcrumbs on top (forgot them!).

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    -Mary
  • Post #1246 - September 9th, 2020, 1:42 pm
    Post #1246 - September 9th, 2020, 1:42 pm Post #1246 - September 9th, 2020, 1:42 pm
    The GP wrote:Mr. X has been in charge of the tomato-corn pie and he wasn't in the mood to cook so eggplant it was! Tasty results even without the breadcrumbs on top (forgot them!).

    They look great, Mary. Have to give those a whirl, soon.

    It's been a late but steady harvest here and we're finally getting our homegrown tomatoes. Recently paired them up with some homemade bacon to make BLTs for a family lunch . . .

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    BLT Sandwich
    Homemade Kurobuta Bacon, homegrown green zebra tomato and grocery store iceberg lettuce on home-baked (by a friend) bread.

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    BLT Sandwich
    Homemade Kurobuta Bacon, homegrown green zebra tomato and grocery store iceberg lettuce on toasted buttercrust white bread.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1247 - September 9th, 2020, 3:47 pm
    Post #1247 - September 9th, 2020, 3:47 pm Post #1247 - September 9th, 2020, 3:47 pm
    Most Sundays I race my small sailboat, but last Sunday was to windy. Great opportunity to cook all afternoon.
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    Started by making a chicken sausage from Bruce Aidells. Contained Chicken thighs, turkey thighs, onions, parsley, garlic, paprika, salt, olive oil, fresh mint, tomato paste, lemon juice and zest, fennel, cumin, coriander, black pepper, sugar, tumeric, allspice and ground cayenne.
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    Ground, mixed and extruding
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    Meanwhile, I had Kenji dough that had been in the fridge for 3 days and baked it.

    For Dinner I was cooking from Jamie Oliver's 'Comfort Food'. I made his recipe called 'Double Whammy Toad in the Hole'. Jamie is a British writer who is very fun to read. His recipes will say something like, 'add a lug of oil and cook to perfection'.
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    Started by making the sauce. Fried onions and one of the chicken sausages without the casing that I made earlier in a pan until very brown. Added HP sauce ( an iconic British sauce that I got at Marianos ), flour and water to make a deep brown rich sauce.
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    Put 4 sausages in a pan as the sauce finished up. Roasted those sausages for 15 minutes and then added Yorkshire pudding liquid.
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    Yorkshire pudding is made from eggs, flour, milk, and beer. It is poured over the sausages and allowed to bake for 30 minutes. It rises as it is baking and you serve portions of the Yorkshire pudding/sausage with sauce ladled over\
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  • Post #1248 - September 9th, 2020, 5:57 pm
    Post #1248 - September 9th, 2020, 5:57 pm Post #1248 - September 9th, 2020, 5:57 pm
    The GP wrote:A cool night meant something warm from the oven. It was a toss-up between the tomato-corn pie or stuffed eggplant parmesan from the Smitten Kitchen website. Mr. X has been in charge of the tomato-corn pie and he wasn't in the mood to cook so eggplant it was! Tasty results even without the breadcrumbs on top (forgot them!).

    Image

    Thanks for sharing the recipes. I just finished making the stuffed eggplant recipe. Followed it to the letter minus the basil. Good stuff!
    Last edited by Dave148 on September 9th, 2020, 7:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
    Never order barbecue in a place that also serves quiche - Lewis Grizzard
  • Post #1249 - September 9th, 2020, 6:40 pm
    Post #1249 - September 9th, 2020, 6:40 pm Post #1249 - September 9th, 2020, 6:40 pm
    lougord99 wrote:Toad in the Hole'

    Glorious!

    Toad in the Hole, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1250 - September 9th, 2020, 7:05 pm
    Post #1250 - September 9th, 2020, 7:05 pm Post #1250 - September 9th, 2020, 7:05 pm
    tomorrow i am going to experiment with using some of the shrimp pieces from imperfect foods in a version of a korean seafood pancake.

    i am thinking (all rough quantities):

    a pound of shrimp chopped, mixing 1/4c or so of chives, 1 tbsp sesame oil, 3 scallions, 1 tbsp minced ginger, a little salt or dash of soy sauce and white or red pepper.

    in a separate bowl 1/4 c each of rice flour, flour, cornstarch, 1 egg, and 2/3c or a little more of club soda.

    then combine the two and cook pancakes in a neutral oil in large nonstick pan or griddle.

    serve with a dipping sauce like black vinegar with soy& grated garlic.

    got ways to refine the plan?
  • Post #1251 - September 9th, 2020, 7:09 pm
    Post #1251 - September 9th, 2020, 7:09 pm Post #1251 - September 9th, 2020, 7:09 pm
    lougord99 wrote:Most Sundays I race my small sailboat, but last Sunday was to windy. Great opportunity to cook all afternoon . . .

    Lou, Lou, Lou!! That yorkshire pudding with sausages nestled in it is the stuff of dreams. That is awesome! Great way to spend a Sunday, for sure.

    Most of my friends, including Jazzfood, have endured me yammering on incessantly over the years about my college years in New Orleans, and specifically about the food at Mosca's, the legendary spot just outside of town (in Westwego, LA) where I enjoyed some of the greatest meals of my life. A few days ago, Jazzfood sent me a link to a recipe for one of Mosca's signature dishes, Chicken a la Grande. I had to give it a whirl . . .

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    Mise En Place
    Everything except the chicken. This is one of those dishes that far surpasses the sum of its parts. Salt, black pepper, white wine, evoo, garlic, oregano and rosemary.

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    Seasoned Chicken Thighs
    After the bird gets tossed in the white wine (which is eventually added back during the latter stage of cooking), it's heavily seasoned with salt and pepper and fried in evoo. The recipe calls for white and dark meat but who are we kidding? This is a chicken thigh dish if there ever was one! :D

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    Chicken Frying
    About halfway through the cooking. Seasoned chicken, evoo and a 12.5" Lodge cast iron skillet.

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    Green Beans
    The recipe Jazzfood sent was actually two recipes. One was for the chicken and the other was for these green beans, which get their distinguishing note from a splash of apple cider vinegar that gets added at the very end of the cooking.

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    Patty Pan Squash
    When you're cleaning out the fridge, you're cleaning out the fridge. Our next CSA delivery is only two days away. :shock: A quick saute in evoo here. Then, a splash of water, cover and steam and cook until tender.

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    Chicken A La Grande
    This turned out great and really brought me back to my days in NOLA. Perhaps I'd do a few minor things a bit differently with this dish next time but I wouldn't change very much.

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    Plated Up
    Chicken a la Grande, sauteed green beans, sauteed and steamed patty pans.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1252 - September 9th, 2020, 9:41 pm
    Post #1252 - September 9th, 2020, 9:41 pm Post #1252 - September 9th, 2020, 9:41 pm
    annak wrote:tomorrow i am going to experiment with using some of the shrimp pieces from imperfect foods in a version of a korean seafood pancake.

    i am thinking (all rough quantities):

    a pound of shrimp chopped, mixing 1/4c or so of chives, 1 tbsp sesame oil, 3 scallions, 1 tbsp minced ginger, a little salt or dash of soy sauce and white or red pepper.

    in a separate bowl 1/4 c each of rice flour, flour, cornstarch, 1 egg, and 2/3c or a little more of club soda.

    then combine the two and cook pancakes in a neutral oil in large nonstick pan or griddle.

    serve with a dipping sauce like black vinegar with soy& grated garlic.

    got ways to refine the plan?

    I've never made pajeon but your plan sounds good to me. A pound of shrimp may be more than you need (or can fit) in that amount of batter but you can eyeball that on the fly.

    Is cornstarch typically used in pajeon? I would have never guessed.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1253 - September 9th, 2020, 11:13 pm
    Post #1253 - September 9th, 2020, 11:13 pm Post #1253 - September 9th, 2020, 11:13 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Chicken A La Grande

    Glorious! (My new favorite word)

    lougord99 wrote:Toad in the Hole'

    Speaking of which, I remembered I made Toad in the Hole with smoked onion gravy for one of the Pitmaster dinners. Was a highlight.

    Click to enlarge
    Toad in the Hole
    Image

    Toad in the hole, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1254 - September 9th, 2020, 11:22 pm
    Post #1254 - September 9th, 2020, 11:22 pm Post #1254 - September 9th, 2020, 11:22 pm
    annak wrote:tomorrow i am going to experiment with using some of the shrimp pieces from imperfect foods in a version of a korean seafood pancake.
    =-=--=
    got ways to refine the plan?

    Maangchi video with recipe.
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1255 - September 10th, 2020, 7:37 pm
    Post #1255 - September 10th, 2020, 7:37 pm Post #1255 - September 10th, 2020, 7:37 pm
    Italian theme tonight. Started with the primo piatto, some pasta . . .

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    Mise En Place
    Everything for Cacio E Pepe except the the water . . . pecorino romano, (a lot of) toasted black peppercorns and pici.

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    Pici
    Al dente noodles go into a preheated pan along with a little of the pasta water. In the bowl to the right is the grated pecorino, which has been mixed with some additional pasta water to form an emulsion. This emulsion is the sauce and it gets poured back over the pici -- along with two tablespoons of coarsely cracked toasted pepper -- after which it's all mixed together, then served. One somewhat counter-intuitive key is cooking the pasta in as little water as possible in order to increase the water's starchiness. This aids in the emulsification of the sauce.

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    Plated Up
    Cacio E Pepe, garnished with some additional pecorino romano.

    Secondo Piatto . . .

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    Mise En Place
    Sliced yellow onions, Middlebrow's Campesino Sour and my 25-year-old Henckels 10" Chef Knife. This thing weighs 340g! I recently sharpened it and it's never performed better. Until about 18 months ago, this was my everyday, favorite knife. Now, I can't believe how insanely heavy it feels. It doesn't get much use these days and not even a nice sharpening job is likely to change that.

    Image
    Hot Italian Sausage Browning
    Getting a little color on the sausage before removing it to cook the onions.

    Image
    Onions & Beer Simmering
    Once the onions get a bit of color, the beer is added and the whole business cooks down for a while.

    Image
    Sausage, Onions & Beer
    Once the liquid reduces, the sausages are added back, the pan is covered and it continues to cook until the sausages are done (~155F).

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    Plated Up
    Sausage & Onions and tomatoey-garlicky okra, expertly made by Mrs. Suburban. :D

    The whole meal was great but I was especially happy with the cacio e pepe. It was my first time making it and it was beautiful the way the cheese and pasta water came together to form that creamy emulsion. Eating it, if I didn't already know that there was no oil, butter or cream added to it, I never would have believed it.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1256 - September 11th, 2020, 5:53 am
    Post #1256 - September 11th, 2020, 5:53 am Post #1256 - September 11th, 2020, 5:53 am
    Pork Tinga last night. Simmer 2 inch pieces of pork tenderloin in water with herbs for 45 minutes. Add chunks of potato for last 15 minutes. Pull out pork and potatoes leaving behind the broth. When cool chop potatoes into smaller pieces and pork into thin slices. Thin slice an onion.
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    Brown pork and onions in a fry pan. This browning of ingredients is a hallmark of Mexican cuisine. Add in potatoes and a 28 oz. can of good tomatos chunked up. Cook for 5 minutes. Then add 1 cup of the broth created earlier and a sliced up chipotle pepper in Adobo along with some of the adobo sauce. Let everything blend together for 10 minutes as the broth slowly cooks away. When ready to serve, add a large chunk of goat cheese and cut up avocado.

    This is one of our favorites.
  • Post #1257 - September 11th, 2020, 7:15 am
    Post #1257 - September 11th, 2020, 7:15 am Post #1257 - September 11th, 2020, 7:15 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Italian theme tonight. Started with the primo piatto, some pasta . . .
    Pici
    Al dente noodles go into a preheated pan along with a little of the pasta water. In the bowl to the right is the grated pecorino, which has been mixed with some additional pasta water to form an emulsion. This emulsion is the sauce and it gets poured back over the pici -- along with two tablespoons of coarsely cracked toasted pepper -- after which it's all mixed together, then served. One somewhat counter-intuitive key is cooking the pasta in as little water as possible in order to increase the water's starchiness. This aids in the emulsification of the sauce.

    Did you use the two-tined fork meat method for whipping the sauce into an emulsion? I've seen that listed several places. I've used it for carbonara, but that has the eggs to ensure emulsification.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #1258 - September 11th, 2020, 9:37 am
    Post #1258 - September 11th, 2020, 9:37 am Post #1258 - September 11th, 2020, 9:37 am
    JoelF wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Italian theme tonight. Started with the primo piatto, some pasta . . .
    Pici
    Al dente noodles go into a preheated pan along with a little of the pasta water. In the bowl to the right is the grated pecorino, which has been mixed with some additional pasta water to form an emulsion. This emulsion is the sauce and it gets poured back over the pici -- along with two tablespoons of coarsely cracked toasted pepper -- after which it's all mixed together, then served. One somewhat counter-intuitive key is cooking the pasta in as little water as possible in order to increase the water's starchiness. This aids in the emulsification of the sauce.

    Did you use the two-tined fork meat method for whipping the sauce into an emulsion? I've seen that listed several places. I've used it for carbonara, but that has the eggs to ensure emulsification.

    I used a tiny whisk but I got the sense that even a teaspoon would have been fine. The starch in the pasta water was really the key here.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1259 - September 11th, 2020, 11:25 am
    Post #1259 - September 11th, 2020, 11:25 am Post #1259 - September 11th, 2020, 11:25 am
    annak wrote:don't know about you guys but quarantine cooking is weighing on me; inspiration lagging. i miss restaurants! i love cooking, but regular trips to ambitious eateries always gave me ideas and goals for the home kitchen.



    I feel the same way. I will cook inspired for 2-3 weeks and then hit a brick wall. We have addressed this in three ways:

    1) Cooking batches of soups and stews and freezing a number of meals. The problem with this is that both of our freezers are completely full at this time. We do have access to several other freezers but we have not gone there yet.

    2) Use some convenience products. Gordon's fish fillets and premade pizza crusts are not ideal but they are not bad.

    3) I can generally count on one of our friends to drop off meals periodically. Fortunately, it is always something that is outside of my repertoire.

    And yes, occasionally, a stop at Carl Jrs. or El Pollo Loco.
  • Post #1260 - September 11th, 2020, 6:49 pm
    Post #1260 - September 11th, 2020, 6:49 pm Post #1260 - September 11th, 2020, 6:49 pm
    I'd been eyeballing this recipe for Hakka-style stuffed peppers at Souped Up Recipes's youtube channel since it first popped up a few days ago, so when both melrose and banana peppers arrived with today's CSA box, I decided to give it a shot. But first, there was side dish prep . . .

    Image
    Purple Cabbage and Konosuke HD Gyuyto, 240 mm
    That was one huge cabbage, just over 5 pounds whole. That's an 8-quart bowl, nearly full! :shock:

    Image
    Peppers, Stuffed
    The filling is mainly ground pork, egg, garlic, ginger, scallion, corn starch and some other seasonings. The most unexpected component, at least to me, was rehydrated dried mushrooms. After a 2-hour soak, they get minced and added to the filling. The soaking liquid ultimately becomes the foundation of the sauce.

    Image
    Stuffed Peppers, Frying
    Just a touch of peanut oil in a cast iron skillet. They start meat-side-down but get flipped around a few times during the cook, which is mostly covered, so that the peppers will soften after they blister.

    Image
    Stuffed Peppers, Fried
    I think they took about 15 minutes until the meat was browned nicely and the peppers were blistered and soft.

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    Plated Up
    Hakka-style stuffed peppers and braised cabbage (with garlic, Chinese cooking wine, honey, soy sauce, toasted sesame oil, etc.). The sauce, which thickened all-glossy via the inclusion of some cornstarch, was delicious but I went a little bit off-script and added some fermented black beans, which were not part the recipe but really added a perfect punch. This is intended to be made with hot peppers but for us, it was pepper roulette. The melroses were mild but some of the bananas had some heat. I think I might try this again with jalapenos next time. In my house, that means I'll probably be eating them solo but that's perfectly okay with me. :D

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain

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