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Corona cuisine / Social distancing cooking
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  • Post #1321 - September 24th, 2020, 9:43 am
    Post #1321 - September 24th, 2020, 9:43 am Post #1321 - September 24th, 2020, 9:43 am
    JP1121 wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote: I took a very deep dive down the char siu rabbit-hole. It damned near started with chopping some wood . . .

    I really enjoy these posts and appreciate the effort, both in the doing and the posting. Thanks.

    Thanks, it's my pleasure. Working from home full-time has afforded me a wonderful opportunity to spend a lot more time with my family and a lot more time messing around in the kitchen, the latter of which has been a very welcome distraction. And since I'm no longer taking pictures in restaurants, documenting my own cooking has helped fill in that void.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1322 - September 24th, 2020, 3:05 pm
    Post #1322 - September 24th, 2020, 3:05 pm Post #1322 - September 24th, 2020, 3:05 pm
    G Wiv wrote:banana lassi
    have never seen one outside of India. Always wondered why not? Did you make or buy?
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #1323 - September 24th, 2020, 4:06 pm
    Post #1323 - September 24th, 2020, 4:06 pm Post #1323 - September 24th, 2020, 4:06 pm
    G Wiv wrote:banana lassi
    Jazzfood wrote:have never seen one outside of India. Always wondered why not? Did you make or buy?

    Made. Ripe bananas sitting on the counter and thought, like you, why not.

    Interestingly, I made quite a bit, enough I had about a pint leftover. Was better the next day. Smoother, more balanced, lighter.

    5% full fat yogurt, whole milk, ice, honey, bit of salt, bit of cumin, couple of bananas. Blend blend blend in high-powered blender. Taste, then blend some more. Add ice, more honey, salt. Taste. Blend, blend, blend.

    Next day leftover lassi served over ice.

    Alan, I realize you know how to make a lassi, basic outline for those who do not. :)
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1324 - September 24th, 2020, 7:23 pm
    Post #1324 - September 24th, 2020, 7:23 pm Post #1324 - September 24th, 2020, 7:23 pm
    Definitely from the looks way better than it actually was category, grilled pizzas . . .

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    Pepperoni & Onion
    Dough rolled, topped and shimmied smoothly from the peel to the stone. Ah, good times.

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    Sausage & Onion
    Again, the pizza cooperated and traveled without issue from the peel to the stone. Lulled, I was.

    Wait! What's that burning smell?! :x Classic R.A.T. (rookie, amateur, tourist) move by me. The stone was way too hot and the pizzas had to come off way before they were done. In the end, I managed to save them but only after getting them off the grill and under the broiler to finish. So confident I was, that I brazenly did not pre-heat my oven or my pizza steel. Once the grill outsmarted me, all I could do was broil them to finish because the oven and steel were cold.

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    Pepperoni & Onion Pizza
    Saying this nearly burnt and yet undercooked pizza was not half-bad would be a great exaggeration.

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    Sausage & Onion Pizza
    Since this was the second one onto the grill, it fared a bit better but that's not saying much.

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    Plated Up
    With sauteed squash and homemade cole slaw which was, quite unfortunately, the tastiest item in the frame. I've made pizzas dozens of times but never on the Weber. New dough recipe (which, honestly, I didn't love but I'm not scapegoating here), new technique . . . just too many variables. I should have just stuck to the oven on these. Still lots and lots to learn . . . obviously. :(

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1325 - September 26th, 2020, 3:13 pm
    Post #1325 - September 26th, 2020, 3:13 pm Post #1325 - September 26th, 2020, 3:13 pm
    Quick re-purposing of leftover meatballs last night. But first, side dish preparation . . .

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    Bell Peppers, Onions & Kurosaki R2 Hammered Gyuto, 210mm
    Stewed down with a little white wine and oregano, these make a nice side dish or condiment.

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    Baked Meatball & Sausage Casserole
    Sliced up homemade meatballs (and a bit of leftover sausage) with marinara, mozzarella and parmesan. Baked for ~35 minutes @ 350F. Side dish of stewed peppers and onions. Easy, quick and tasty.

    Early this afternoon, brunchtime . . .

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    Plated Up
    Cheese & sauteed shallot omelet. Toasted sesame bagel with chive cheese, homemade cold-smoked Ora king salmon (nearly the end of it) and yellow tomato from our garden.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1326 - September 27th, 2020, 7:49 pm
    Post #1326 - September 27th, 2020, 7:49 pm Post #1326 - September 27th, 2020, 7:49 pm
    hanging on to summer tonight, we smoked Duroc ribs with an excellent dry rub, made my best mac-n-cheese, a vinegary slaw of red and savoy cabbage, pickles, watermelon, and an apple cheddar pie. (image function still not working for us, alas)

    it was a nice night outside, and with a fire crackling in the pit, we had our own porky version of yom kippur, hoping for repair of the world.
  • Post #1327 - September 28th, 2020, 10:58 am
    Post #1327 - September 28th, 2020, 10:58 am Post #1327 - September 28th, 2020, 10:58 am
    Not that one needs to but I took a multi-day approach to a recent batch of pork enchiladas. After meatballs and char siu, this was the third and final apportionment of the massive pork shoulder I had in the freezer. The process started with braising the shoulder . . .

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    Prepping The Shoulder Sear
    Salt, black pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, freshly ground cumin and Mexican oregano.

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    Prepping The Shoulder Braise
    Smashed garlic, shallots, onions, bay leaves, a baby corona & Konosuke SKD Tsuchime Gyuto, 240mm, Ebony.

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    Searing The Shoulder
    Once rubbed with the seasonings, I browned the shoulder on all sides in a touch of oil.

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    Seared Shoulder
    Once seared on all sides, I removed the shoulder from the pot and set it aside briefly.

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    Braising Medium
    With the shoulder removed, I threw in the aromatics, which helped lift the fond from the bottom of the dutch oven. Once everything browned a bit and softened, I added the beer.

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    Ready For Braising
    With the aromatics softened, I put the shoulder back in the pot.

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    Braising
    Everything in, I covered the Dutch oven and put it in the oven at 275F for about 4 hours, checking it for doneness every so often.

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    Braised Pork Shoulder
    Fork tender and just a few steps away from becoming part of the enchilada filling.

    The next step was making the salsa roja that would be mixed into the shredded shoulder and also used atop the casserole.

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    Assorted Dried Chiles
    Nice to deplete the inventory in my pantry.

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    Prepping The Chiles
    Was grateful for a nice day, which allowed me to take care of this somewhat messy task outside. Using a kitchen shears, I removed the stems and cut the chiles into small pieces, which made seeding them pretty easy.

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    Basket
    Swishing the cut chiles around in this rice basket was pretty useful, as a lot of fine debris and quite a few additional seeds passed through.

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    Pork Jus
    Another component of the sauce were the juices that rendered out during the braising of the pork. After being in the fridge, the fat -- which rose to the top and solidified -- was easy to remove. I'll save it in the freezer for some future project.

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    Making The Sauce
    The chile pieces are dry-toasted in the pan, then removed so that large chunks of onion and tomato, as well as a few whole cloves of garlic can get a quick char in the same pan. After that, the toasted chile pieces are added back, along with the pork jus and enough water to cover the whole business. From there, I added some more Mexican oregano and let it all simmer for a while. Once it had reduced a bit and everything was soft, into the Vitamix it went.

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    Blended Sauce
    After its spin in the Vitamix, the blended sauce went back into the pan for a bit more cooking time and some additional seasoning. I contemplated running this through a fine mesh strainer but decided that the benefits wouldn't likely justify the time and the additional clean-up it would require.

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    Saucing The Shredded Shoulder Meat
    This was definitely the right time to burn some PPE. You don't want to get the meat too wet but it needs a little sauce before it goes into the enchiladas.

    Since I had some on hand, I decided to roast some poblanos, strips of which would also be part of the filling.

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    Roasted Poblano Peppers
    From here, they went into a ziploc. That allowed them to steam up a bit, which made skinning them really easy.

    Next up, tortilla time . . .

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    Making The Tortillas
    Basic masa recipe, which produced about 11 tortillas (55g each). For this particular application, I actually thought they needed to be a little thinner than what the tortilla press could do. So, after I pressed them, I rolled them out a bit by hand, which, needless to say, marred their perfect roundness. Once rolled out, they went immediately onto a hot carbon steel griddle for about a minute on each side.

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    Enchilada Assembly Station
    First, the tortillas get dipped in the sauce (so they don't crack while being rolled up), then filled with meat, grated chihuahua, grated cheddar and a strip or two of roasted poblano. From there, they go seam-side-down into a lightly oiled baking dish.

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    Assembled Enchiladas
    11 pork enchiladas, covered with sauce, the remaining filling cheeses and some grated cotija.

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    Baked Pork Enchiladas
    ~35 minutes @ 350F.

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    Plated Up
    With some Mexican-style rice.

    These were pretty darned good, especially for a first attempt. I'd definitely thin the sauce out a bit more next time. I might add some lime juice and a bit more tomato, too. It was a time consuming process but obviously, there are innumerable shortcuts one could take to speed it up. My guess is that starting with a blend of really high-quality chile powders could entirely eliminate the need for the dried chile steps. And buying tortillas would be a time-saver, too (even though making them is very easy). Using chicken, beans or vegetables instead of pork shoulder would also cut down considerably on the prep time. But in the end, I liked making these this way quite a bit and will definitely do it again in the future.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1328 - September 28th, 2020, 4:28 pm
    Post #1328 - September 28th, 2020, 4:28 pm Post #1328 - September 28th, 2020, 4:28 pm
    Great Ronnie.

    Rick Bayless says that if you use a vitamix, you probably don’t need to strain, but with a lower end mixer you should. I always strain and get a lot of solids - I don’t have a great mixer.

    You suggested using chili powders, but the quantity necessary ( if you can find anything other than ancho ) will make it extremely expensive.
  • Post #1329 - September 28th, 2020, 4:42 pm
    Post #1329 - September 28th, 2020, 4:42 pm Post #1329 - September 28th, 2020, 4:42 pm
    lougord99 wrote:Great Ronnie.

    Rick Bayless says that if you use a vitamix, you probably don’t need to strain, but with a lower end mixer you should. I always strain and get a lot of solids - I don’t have a great mixer.

    You suggested using chili powders, but the quantity necessary ( if you can find anything other than ancho ) will make it extremely expensive.

    Great information, Lou. And you're right about the prices on high-quality ground spices, they're high. I hadn't thought of that. You can see in one of my shots that the dried chiles typically run less than $2/bag. At that price, it's a very easy purchase.

    We didn't have any trouble with solids in the final dish, so I guess the Vitamix handled that aspect well enough. I'm certainly glad I didn't spend any additional time or energy on straining the sauce.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1330 - September 28th, 2020, 6:21 pm
    Post #1330 - September 28th, 2020, 6:21 pm Post #1330 - September 28th, 2020, 6:21 pm
    tonight was an easy pantry dinner, bacon-leek risotto with crispy fried eggs on top. we used parm in the last step but cheddar would work too.
  • Post #1331 - September 28th, 2020, 7:08 pm
    Post #1331 - September 28th, 2020, 7:08 pm Post #1331 - September 28th, 2020, 7:08 pm
    Beef rib roast over here tonight . . .

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    Onions, Leeks & Masakage Yuki White #2 Gyuto, 210mm
    Prepping the roasting bed.

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    Seasoned Up
    A very nicely marbled 3-bone rib roast with sea salt and black pepper on a bed of onions, leeks and fingerling potatoes that had been lightly tossed in oil and seasoned. There's about 1/2 cup of water in the pan to prevent any burning.

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    Roasted
    After just about 2 hours @ 350F. I pulled it at 114F internal and it climbed to 132F before it started falling. You can tell from the excellent trussing job that this was not a diy job. My butcher, Dave Zier, did it for me.

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    Ribs
    Speaking of trussing, one thing Zier's does (all you have to do is ask) is remove the ribs and tie them back onto the roast. That way, everything cooks like a fully intact roast and once the roasting is over, the rest of the prep is really easy to deal with. Once I cut the strings here, the roast was ready to slice. I just popped the ribs back into the oven for ~10 minutes to crisp them up.

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    Plated Up
    With sesame & brandy-sauteed shiitakes, roasting bed veggies, tender-crisp green beans and a light pan gravy. This roast was every bit as good as it looks; one of the best haunches of beast we've had in a long time.

    Happy Monday! :)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1332 - September 29th, 2020, 6:39 pm
    Post #1332 - September 29th, 2020, 6:39 pm Post #1332 - September 29th, 2020, 6:39 pm
    Mega clean-out of the fridge into something between a casserole and shepherd's pie . . .

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    Bunch Of Business & Saji R-2 Gyuto, 210mm
    Roster of leftovers: meatballs, sausage, green beans, shiitake mushrooms and meat juices from a few different braises

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    Baked Shepherd's Casserole
    Before I baked it, I took the leftover roasting bed veggies from last night's roast -- onions, leeks, potatoes (skins and all) -- and ran them through the food mill. After that, I whisked in some melted butter and half & half to create the "mashed" potato topping. It's pretty dark but mainly because the potato skins were included.

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    Plated Up
    One helluv'an unappetizing shot but it really tasted great . . . and now I can actually see light when I open the refrigerator door! :D

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1333 - September 29th, 2020, 7:27 pm
    Post #1333 - September 29th, 2020, 7:27 pm Post #1333 - September 29th, 2020, 7:27 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Beef rib roast over here tonight . . .

    Dear Sweet Carol Channing's Ghost, that is Beautiful, simply glorious. Diamond-Cutter time!

    Interestingly, I had a similar dinner tonight. Banana lassi and grandmother cookies out of a tin.
    Image

    Standing Rib Roast, my favorite vegetable!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1334 - September 30th, 2020, 6:57 pm
    Post #1334 - September 30th, 2020, 6:57 pm Post #1334 - September 30th, 2020, 6:57 pm
    G Wiv wrote:Standing Rib Roast, my favorite vegetable!

    LOL - I'm going to steal that one. :D

    Not that it wasn't enjoyable but through poor planning and a now-remedied household repair crisis, we ended up having beef as our main course again tonight. And a few largely familiar side dishes . . .

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    Chicken Of The Woods Mushrooms & Saji G3 Ginsan Nakiri, 165mm
    Got these via my awesome local-forager connection. I'd never cooked these before but figured I could muddle my way through it.

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    Chicken Of The Woods Mushrooms
    Ended up doing a quick saute in evoo, shallots and garlic. After that, I flambe'd 20ml of brandy. Next, I tossed in a bit of white wine and some water, covered the pan and let them simmer until they softened up. Very meaty and delicious.

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    Prime NY Strip Steaks
    Not from our butcher and unfortunately, it was really easy to tell. They were fine but not particularly flavorful.

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    Plated Up
    Charcoal-grilled NY strip steak with chicken of woods mushrooms and broccoli (roasted with evoo and red chile flakes).

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    Med-Rare
    Not complaining but I definitely need a break from beef. Looking forward to lightening it up over the next few days.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1335 - October 1st, 2020, 7:29 am
    Post #1335 - October 1st, 2020, 7:29 am Post #1335 - October 1st, 2020, 7:29 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    Chicken Of The Woods Mushrooms
    Ended up doing a quick saute in evoo, shallots and garlic. After that, I flambe'd 20ml of brandy. Next, I tossed in a bit of white wine and some water, covered the pan and let them simmer until they softened up. Very meaty and delicious.


    Good call with the wet cooking on the c-o-t-w. While they're packed with umami, I find their slightly woody texture off putting. Braising helps. I usually skip collecting them unless they are very young and tender.

    Hen season has popped off in the W burbs (friends in Cook Co. still aren't having luck.) I'm guessing it'll be a stunted crop this year with the dry past few months, though conditions have been favorable this past week. I found a juicy young 1+ lb. specimen in a public park while playing with my son.

    It'll be just enough to cover our fall favorites– Stroganoff, risotto, and any scraps leftover thrown on pizza. I'm pretty sure I'll find more and I plan on slicing thick for the grill and serving up like steak sandwiches.

    In other "of-the-woods" news, I stumbled upon some "shrimp-of-the-woods" in my front yard growing around a rotted tree stump over the weekend. I hadn't even heard that name until recently, in the books it goes by Entoloma abortivum, or aborted entoloma. Its a pretty bizarre species– little white irregular nodules that look a bit like garlic or engorged Pirate's booty– its actually one mushroom parasitized by another.

    I found them to be quite delectable– mild and sweet with a distinctive squeaky texture not unlike shrimp. I sautéd in butter with garlic and good Sauvignon blanc & tossed with fusilli. I look forward to keeping an eye out for these every fall.
  • Post #1336 - October 1st, 2020, 8:00 am
    Post #1336 - October 1st, 2020, 8:00 am Post #1336 - October 1st, 2020, 8:00 am
    Hi,

    Hen of the Woods aka grifola frondosa have been popping up for weeks in the area. Located at the base of oak trees, they tend to return to the same spot year to year.

    A Czech friend will take a grifola frondosa segment, dip in egg, roll in bread crumbs and fry. If he is freezing, then he found egg substitutes allow a longer freeze than made with fresh eggs. I have served this as appetizers at Thanksgiving.

    I had not heard of aborted entoloma referred to as shrimp of the woods, I will have to ask.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #1337 - October 1st, 2020, 10:57 am
    Post #1337 - October 1st, 2020, 10:57 am Post #1337 - October 1st, 2020, 10:57 am
    In other "of-the-woods" news, I stumbled upon some "shrimp-of-the-woods" in my front yard growing around a rotted tree stump over the weekend.


    Last weekend we found both chicken and shrimp, along with oyster. The chicken and oyster were both delicious simply sautéed in butter.

    The shrimp were so gritty we couldn't eat them. Alas! Glad to hear you found delicious ones.
  • Post #1338 - October 1st, 2020, 11:35 am
    Post #1338 - October 1st, 2020, 11:35 am Post #1338 - October 1st, 2020, 11:35 am
    annak wrote:
    In other "of-the-woods" news, I stumbled upon some "shrimp-of-the-woods" in my front yard growing around a rotted tree stump over the weekend.


    Last weekend we found both chicken and shrimp, along with oyster. The chicken and oyster were both delicious simply sautéed in butter.

    The shrimp were so gritty we couldn't eat them. Alas! Glad to hear you found delicious ones.


    Mine were super clean!
    I'm a little worried about the hen in my fridge though.

    Also speaking of hen, I'm not the only one checking my spots anymore. This morning one of "my" trees had been harvested from already, this is the first time this has happened since I started collecting in these woods six years ago.

    I remember in the spring ramps spots were being decimated. Seems like people are foraging more in the pandemic.
  • Post #1339 - October 1st, 2020, 1:18 pm
    Post #1339 - October 1st, 2020, 1:18 pm Post #1339 - October 1st, 2020, 1:18 pm
    A friend from mushroom club was a very well known mushroom hunter. He would be on tv promoting Hoby Fest and was seasonally a visitor on the Ray Rayner show.

    When he went mushroom hunting, people would follow along.

    He bought a home whose backyard was a Cook County Forest Preserve. He would hunt mushrooms by flashlight. When he found immature specimens, he would pile leaves on top to hide them.

    He ate mushrooms at every meal. He had a refrigerator in the garage filled with pickled mushrooms to eat throughout the year.

    Just so you are not upset later, pretty much Cook and collar counties forbid mushroom collecting. A few years ago, I fielded a phone call from a Michigan visitor who had a $75 citation as a souvenir. He expected our club to go to court with him. He also felt our website should warn him about this issue. Oh joy, we were all meeting up at a national foray shortly thereafter.

    State and National forests are ok, but practically none available in easy driving distance.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #1340 - October 1st, 2020, 3:57 pm
    Post #1340 - October 1st, 2020, 3:57 pm Post #1340 - October 1st, 2020, 3:57 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:A friend from mushroom club was a very well known mushroom hunter. He would be on tv promoting Hoby Fest and was seasonally a visitor on the Ray Rayner show.

    When he went mushroom hunting, people would follow along.

    He bought a home whose backyard was a Cook County Forest Preserve. He would hunt mushrooms by flashlight. When he found immature specimens, he would pile leaves on top to hide them.

    He ate mushrooms at every meal. He had a refrigerator in the garage filled with pickled mushrooms to eat throughout the year.

    Just so you are not upset later, pretty much Cook and collar counties forbid mushroom collecting. A few years ago, I fielded a phone call from a Michigan visitor who had a $75 citation as a souvenir. He expected our club to go to court with him. He also felt our website should warn him about this issue. Oh joy, we were all meeting up at a national foray shortly thereafter.

    State and National forests are ok, but practically none available in easy driving distance.

    Regards,
    Cathy2


    I've been doing this 13 years, probably not as long as your friend, but I'm aware of the risks and ethics. I tread lightly on public land.

    I'm fortunate enough that I can harvest morels, honey mushrooms, and now, shrimp of the woods on my own property.
  • Post #1341 - October 1st, 2020, 7:33 pm
    Post #1341 - October 1st, 2020, 7:33 pm Post #1341 - October 1st, 2020, 7:33 pm
    No cooking over here tonight. Leftovers for lunch and for dinner, ended up getting some carry-out tacos that weren't half-bad. However, there was some coleslaw prep earlier in the day . . .

    Image
    Cabbages & Prized Kitchen Tools

    Red cabbage, napa cabbage, Takeda Stainless-Clad Aogami Super Sasanoha Gyuto, 210mm and my ultra-rare Graham Kerr (oka The Galloping Gourmet) Bench Knife. Pretty sure that one's out of print these days. ;) I still haven't unlocked the key to duplicating Carson's coleslaw but in the process of trying to do, I've come up with some excellent recipes that I think might actually surpass it.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1342 - October 2nd, 2020, 2:48 am
    Post #1342 - October 2nd, 2020, 2:48 am Post #1342 - October 2nd, 2020, 2:48 am
    Cathy2 wrote:Just so you are not upset later, pretty much Cook and collar counties forbid mushroom collecting. A few years ago, I fielded a phone call from a Michigan visitor who had a $75 citation as a souvenir. He expected our club to go to court with him. He also felt our website should warn him about this issue. Oh joy, we were all meeting up at a national foray shortly thereafter.

    Regards,
    Cathy2


    Personally, I am very concerned about professional mushroom collectors.

    Two years ago, we were taking a short hike in a Provincial Park in Central Alberta. We saw eight people each harvesting a bushel of mushrooms. It looked like a well organized machine. Something did not look right as there were "spotters" who did not like our presence.

    We did call the park rangers but when they arrived, the group was gone.
  • Post #1343 - October 2nd, 2020, 8:59 am
    Post #1343 - October 2nd, 2020, 8:59 am Post #1343 - October 2nd, 2020, 8:59 am
    jlawrence01 wrote:Personally, I am very concerned about professional mushroom collectors.

    Two years ago, we were taking a short hike in a Provincial Park in Central Alberta. We saw eight people each harvesting a bushel of mushrooms. It looked like a well organized machine. Something did not look right as there were "spotters" who did not like our presence.

    Did you talk to the rangers? What, if anything, would they have done? It might be it is within the law.

    In the Northwest, there are incidents of professional pickers fighting over territory. They do aggressive tactics like pitch tents over a promising location. Nobody is staying there, they are marking their territory. Things have escalated into shootings and death.

    I have encountered people who called our club, because they had collected a dozen grifola frondosa. They did not want to do all the work of cleaning, and hoped I would identify a customer. "Why did you take so many?" "If I did not, somebody else might!" That is not a winning answer in my book.

    Our club has permits to collect at specific locations. We draw up lists of everything found as well as send unique specimens for the Field Museum herbarium and to people doing specialized research. Some mushrooms are collected for the pot, too, nothing approaching what you witnessed. Our bylaws do not allow any picking-for-profit on our forays.

    If I find a single grifola frondosa in any year, I am quite satisfied. I don't like going into the woods by myself. You never know what you may come across, and I like to live for another day.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #1344 - October 2nd, 2020, 11:42 pm
    Post #1344 - October 2nd, 2020, 11:42 pm Post #1344 - October 2nd, 2020, 11:42 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:
    jlawrence01 wrote:Personally, I am very concerned about professional mushroom collectors.

    Two years ago, we were taking a short hike in a Provincial Park in Central Alberta. We saw eight people each harvesting a bushel of mushrooms. It looked like a well organized machine. Something did not look right as there were "spotters" who did not like our presence.

    Did you talk to the rangers? What, if anything, would they have done? It might be it is within the law.

    Regards,
    Cathy2



    Once I finally saw a ranger, they were appreciative that I called them. There were signs in the provincial park like many of the state park in the US that forbade collecting of plants and other materials in the park.

    However, since the call went through Ottawa, ON, it was at least 45 minutes before they responded and the team had already left for the day.
  • Post #1345 - October 4th, 2020, 1:37 pm
    Post #1345 - October 4th, 2020, 1:37 pm Post #1345 - October 4th, 2020, 1:37 pm
    Took a first-ever swing at Pasteis De Nata and I'm going to give myself a C+ on the overall effort . . .

    Image
    Pasteis De Nata

    There are a few things I'd do differently next time but most of the recipes out there are very similar, so making changes is going to be more a matter of technique/method than anything else. Still, they were quite tasty. The pastry, which is supposed to be the harder part, turned out great. It was flaky and the lamination of the dough came through loud and clear. However, I think I over-reduced the custard just a bit, which led to the filling being a bit more dense than I wanted it. Also, I should have probably let them bake for another minute or two. These went ~14 minutes @ 550F but they could have been a bit darker. In the end, nothing was a failure but there were a few aspects that could have been better.

    Since the PdN recipe uses strictly egg yolks, that illuminated a path to this morning's obligatory egg white omelet . . .

    Image
    Not-So-Healthful Egg White Omelet
    Not only did I cook this in some sort of mystery rendered fat I had in the fridge, but it was filled with leftover sausage, cheese, shallots and onions. Riding shotgun is some buttered toast from a Cellar Door Provisions loaf.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1346 - October 4th, 2020, 4:13 pm
    Post #1346 - October 4th, 2020, 4:13 pm Post #1346 - October 4th, 2020, 4:13 pm
    Living in S.Fla where tastebuds are confiscated @ the boarder, there was an Italian restaurant in Deerfield Beach owned by members of the Rao family that was excellent. An oasis in a desert of mediocrity. Pellegrino's had some great dishes of which this was one, Chicken Scarpariello. I'd made it before but it was never as good as theirs. Lamenting my issue w/the owner one night he told me the missing ingredient. Vinegar. Brightens it up and have been making it in homage ever since. Image
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #1347 - October 4th, 2020, 4:23 pm
    Post #1347 - October 4th, 2020, 4:23 pm Post #1347 - October 4th, 2020, 4:23 pm
    Jazzfood wrote:Lamenting my issue w/the owner one night he told me the missing ingredient. Vinegar. Brightens it up and have been making it in homage ever since. Image

    Vinegar doesn't surprise me. In that WaPo link you sent me for a couple of recipes from Mosca's, one of them is for tender-crisp green beans. At the end, there's a tiny splash of apple cider vinegar added and its impact is significant. When done correctly, you don't even know it's there but if omitted, it definitely feels like something's missing.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1348 - October 4th, 2020, 4:27 pm
    Post #1348 - October 4th, 2020, 4:27 pm Post #1348 - October 4th, 2020, 4:27 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    Jazzfood wrote:When done correctly, you don't even know it's there but if omitted, it definitely feels like something's missing.
    =R=

    Why food reminds me of music.
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #1349 - October 4th, 2020, 4:46 pm
    Post #1349 - October 4th, 2020, 4:46 pm Post #1349 - October 4th, 2020, 4:46 pm
    tonight is a quick dry brined, quick high heat roasted Duroc pork tenderloin with a caper aioli, cannellini aglio e olio, focaccia according to AlexandraCooks blog, and spinach salad. plus some sliced peaches, still tasty even tho it is getting late in the season.
  • Post #1350 - October 4th, 2020, 6:12 pm
    Post #1350 - October 4th, 2020, 6:12 pm Post #1350 - October 4th, 2020, 6:12 pm
    Two of the problems with 'American' food, is that in the 'hot, sweet, salty, sour' we generally miss both the hot and sour. The hot is not that big of a deal ( though I rarely cook without it ), but the missing sour is a glaring problem with our food.

    You can call it sour, brightness or pep. But I feel that it is an essential ingredient ( I usually use lime, but vinegar is just fine ) in most cooking.

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