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  • Post #1381 - October 14th, 2020, 7:26 pm
    Post #1381 - October 14th, 2020, 7:26 pm Post #1381 - October 14th, 2020, 7:26 pm
    Born and raised in E. Rogers Pk. Kamoosh was my life.
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #1382 - October 15th, 2020, 10:08 am
    Post #1382 - October 15th, 2020, 10:08 am Post #1382 - October 15th, 2020, 10:08 am
    I had a package of ground bison from Costco in the freezer that needed to be used. Went the burger route. To the meat, I added minced garlic, Worcestershire sauce, ground mustard, coriander, salt and pepper. Mixed that up, formed patties (approximately 5 ounces each) and let rest at room temp while I prepped other items. (Two of the patties went into the fridge for the next day.) We had some River Valley Ranch mushrooms that needed to be used so I sauteed those in some butter in a cast iron skillet. When the mushrooms were done, I removed them from the pan and added some bacon fat. Cooked the patties a few minutes or so per side. Added a slice of Kerrygold Dubliner, the mushrooms, some pickled red onions and a smear of a mayo/dijon mustard/dried oregano mixture. Served with a roasted sweet potato and some Grillo's pickle chips.

    Image

    I would rate these B-. I don't think my cooking method was the best, but the overall combination was good.
    -Mary
  • Post #1383 - October 15th, 2020, 10:39 am
    Post #1383 - October 15th, 2020, 10:39 am Post #1383 - October 15th, 2020, 10:39 am
    Jazzfood wrote:Kamoosh was my life.

    I knew we had a lot in common! :) Have you tried to make it? The main reason I took it on this time was because Guanajuato's beans really reminded me of the ones on the kamoosh. And since I had some leftover, I figured 'why not?' I'm guessing you'd get closer to the original than I did.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1384 - October 15th, 2020, 10:47 am
    Post #1384 - October 15th, 2020, 10:47 am Post #1384 - October 15th, 2020, 10:47 am
    I don't recall escabeche being involved, although there was some available on table w/the salsas. I remember beans, cheese melted w/a dollop of guac on top post broiler. Kamoosh w/Burrochoza was my go-to and sustained me for yrs.
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #1385 - October 15th, 2020, 10:59 am
    Post #1385 - October 15th, 2020, 10:59 am Post #1385 - October 15th, 2020, 10:59 am
    The GP wrote:I had a package of ground bison from Costco in the freezer that needed to be used.

    The GP wrote:I would rate these B-. I don't think my cooking method was the best, but the overall combination was good.

    I admire your attempt. I have 2 pounds of ground bison in my freezer that I didn't order (was mis-delivered to me by Imperfect Produce). Frankly, I'm scared to use it. I figure no matter what I try to make with it, it's going to be too dry. But I guess I should just go for it.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1386 - October 15th, 2020, 11:00 am
    Post #1386 - October 15th, 2020, 11:00 am Post #1386 - October 15th, 2020, 11:00 am
    Jazzfood wrote:I don't recall escabeche being involved, although there was some available on table w/the salsas. I remember beans, cheese melted w/a dollop of guac on top post broiler. Kamoosh w/Burrochoza was my go-to and sustained me for yrs.

    Damn it, yes. Guac on top. Even your memory is better than mine! :)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1387 - October 15th, 2020, 11:03 am
    Post #1387 - October 15th, 2020, 11:03 am Post #1387 - October 15th, 2020, 11:03 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:I admire your attempt. I have 2 pounds of ground bison in my freezer that I didn't order (was mis-delivered to me by Imperfect Produce). Frankly, I'm scared to use it. I figure no matter what I try to make with it, it's going to be too dry. But I guess I should just go for it.

    That was one of the positives to this meal -- they were not dry at all. I suspect if I would have grilled or broiled them, they would have been less juicy.
    -Mary
  • Post #1388 - October 15th, 2020, 5:56 pm
    Post #1388 - October 15th, 2020, 5:56 pm Post #1388 - October 15th, 2020, 5:56 pm
    The other half of the pork belly from the other night was diced and mixed with some sauteed summer squash from a friend's garden, and some sauce made by roasting garlic, several jalapenos, a sliced onion, and the last green tomatoes from the garden then pureeeing with a can of chicken broth, a little honey and some cilantro. Corn tortillas softened in oil, dipped in sauce and rolled around the pork, topped with more sauce, some cheddar-Jack and cotija hiding in the freezer, baked until bubbly.

    Image

    Recipe
    9oz leftover pork belly, diced
    1.5 C summer squash, diced
    about 4 tsp olive oil (polished off a bottle)

    about 1 lb or so miscellaneous green and slightly red tomatoes (mine were mostly small cherries ranging from chickpea-sized, but a couple tomatoes as big as 2"). Cut the biggest ones in half
    4 jalapeno chiles, sliced lengthwise
    oil
    1 head garlic, whole
    1 medium yellow onion, sliced 1/2" thick
    fistful of cilantro
    1 15oz can of chicken broth
    salt to taste
    juice of 1 lime
    1 tbs honey

    7 corn tortillas
    1/4 cup or so oil for frying
    1/2 C shredded cheese such as jack, cheddar, chihuahua
    3 tbs grated cotija

    7x11 baking dish, half-sheet baking pan, two saucepans, shallow bowl, blender

    Preheat oven to 450 (convec if you've got it). Spread tomatoes, chiles, and onion on a sheet of parchment paper on a baking sheet skin side up, spray or coat with oil. Slice the very top off the head of garlic and drizzle a small amount of oil over it, wrap in foil and put on the baking sheet. Roast until much of the tomato and chile skins are browned, about 20 minutes. Allow to cool. Turn down oven to 350. Squeeze out the garlic cloves from the head, reserving 4. Place everything but the reserved garlic in blender jar with cilantro, broth, lime, honey, and salt to taste. Puree, adjust lime, salt and honey if needed.

    Heat oil in a medium saucepan on medium, add about 4 cloves of the roasted garlic, minced, and the squash, cook until the squash softens. Add the pork belly, cook for 3 minutes to render a little fat, crisp a bit, although I'm not sure either really happened. Add about 1/2C of the pureed sauce, cook a couple more minutes, it should be thickened. Remove from heat. If oven isn't preheated yet (I roasted earlier in the day), preheat to 350.

    Heat oil on low-medium in a small pan big enough for the tortillas. Put about a cup of the sauce in a shallow bowl also big enough to dip the tortillas. Coat the bottom of the baking dish with 1/2 C of sauce.

    For each tortilla, place in the hot oil, use tongs to flip over once or twice until softened. Move to the sauce, get a nice coating on it. Move to a dish or cutting board, scoop some of the pork/squash and roll. Place in the baking dish seam-side down. Repeat for the other tortillas.

    Spread another 1/2C or so of sauce over the top -- it shouldn't be swimming. Sprinkle cheeses over the top, bake until sauce is bubbly and cheese is brown, about 20-30 minutes.
    Last edited by JoelF on October 16th, 2020, 12:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #1389 - October 15th, 2020, 10:28 pm
    Post #1389 - October 15th, 2020, 10:28 pm Post #1389 - October 15th, 2020, 10:28 pm
    One of the things that I have been missing a lot are the Chicken Tostada Salads at El Pollo Loco. It is basically a chicken taco salad. What had kept me from doing this is the inability to produce a quality taco shell.

    Enter the air fryer. I sprayed the fryer basket with pan spray and place a large flour tortilla. I pressed the tortilla against the basket. The first did not turn out well as the tortilla bubbled up. After that, I placed a small oven-proof vegetable dish to hold the shape of the bowl. It worked well. The shells were crispy at 10 minutes at 350F.

    I did not have any chicken in the house but I had a lot of carne asada. I sauteed the carne asada and some of my homemade taco seasoning. Once the meat was done, we layered rice into the bowl, then the meat, then the black beans. On top went a layer of lettuce and we topped it with Rotel canned tomatoes, cheese, crema, and diced avocados.

    As this pandemic continues, our close friends are coming to the realization that out home cooking is better than the local restaurants. Increasingly, we are taking the local Mexican and other recipes, sourcing the ingredients (where possible) and improving upon what many of the local restaurants are doing. Our intent is not to eliminate dining out completely but doing so more judiciously.
  • Post #1390 - October 15th, 2020, 11:54 pm
    Post #1390 - October 15th, 2020, 11:54 pm Post #1390 - October 15th, 2020, 11:54 pm
    Thanks to a friend who again felt like sharing some A-5 Wagyu, I found myself with a nice slab, about a third of which became dinner tonight . . .

    Image
    A-5 Wagyu Beef
    Used about a third of this slab. I vacuum-sealed the remainder for later use.

    Image
    A-5 Slices & Anryu Blue #2 Hammered Gyuto, 240mm
    Did my best to keep them all about the same size.

    Image
    A-5 > Onions
    Light salted, quick, two-side sear on carbon steel and last, diced onions cooking in the rendered fat.

    Image
    Green Beans, Dijon Mustard & Red Miso
    On another burner I seared these green beans very hot and hard in a touch of peanut oil. Once they got some color, I dropped in two cloves of crushed garlic and let it saute for just a few seconds, after which I added about 60ml of hot water and covered the pan. Once the beans had softened up just a bit, I incorporated the dijon and the miso. Once they came off the heat, I added just a few drops of toasted sesame oil.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Seared A-5 wagyu beef with sauteed onions, leftover pommes puree and leftover pan sauce and dijon-miso green beans.

    Image
    Relief
    Always happy when it comes out the way I intended it, especially with beef like this.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1391 - October 16th, 2020, 2:58 am
    Post #1391 - October 16th, 2020, 2:58 am Post #1391 - October 16th, 2020, 2:58 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Image
    A-5 Wagyu Beef

    Prom time is soon upon us. I'd like to take your A-5 if I may. I'll treat her right, limo, hotel room, corsage, Boone's Farm (strawberry) and respectful of no/yes though, hopefully, yes.

    Thanks for your consideration.
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1392 - October 16th, 2020, 12:01 pm
    Post #1392 - October 16th, 2020, 12:01 pm Post #1392 - October 16th, 2020, 12:01 pm
    G Wiv wrote:Prom time is soon upon us. I'd like to take your A-5 if I may. I'll treat her right, limo, hotel room, corsage, Boone's Farm (strawberry) and respectful of no/yes though, hopefully, yes.

    Thanks for your consideration.


    :lol: :lol: :lol: says the plant-based eater.

    Ronnie the meat looks gloriously decadent. I saw it and first word that came to my mind is marbled. I haven't eaten beef this century so is it similar to pork belly but it's beef? It looks like a little goes a long way.

    And miso is everything!
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #1393 - October 16th, 2020, 12:36 pm
    Post #1393 - October 16th, 2020, 12:36 pm Post #1393 - October 16th, 2020, 12:36 pm
    G Wiv wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Image
    A-5 Wagyu Beef

    Prom time is soon upon us. I'd like to take your A-5 if I may. I'll treat her right, limo, hotel room, corsage, Boone's Farm (strawberry) and respectful of no/yes though, hopefully, yes.

    Thanks for your consideration.

    Boone's Farm for the win! :D

    pairs4life wrote:Ronnie the meat looks gloriously decadent. I saw it and first word that came to my mind is marbled. I haven't eaten beef this century so is it similar to pork belly but it's beef? It looks like a little goes a long way.

    And miso is everything!

    I think the biggest difference is the texture. Wagyu is supremely tender, even when only briefly seared. If raw pork belly were cooked in the same manner in which I cooked this beef (about 40 seconds per side), it would be very chewy and probably inedible. As for the marbling, in the wagyu, you see it speckled throughout the muscle tissue. With belly, depending on the breed of hog, it's more likely to be larger, separate striations of fat and lean that make up the belly. In a belly, it's very uncommon for those sections of lean to be marbled.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1394 - October 16th, 2020, 6:57 pm
    Post #1394 - October 16th, 2020, 6:57 pm Post #1394 - October 16th, 2020, 6:57 pm
    Friday is our CSA delivery day, so instead of putting everything away, we just decided to FIFO it with a pot of soup tonight . . .

    Image
    Mise & Takamura Chromax Gyuto, 210mm
    Shallots, onions, turnips, trio of 'greens' (kale, turnip and red frill mustard), garlic, potatoes, hot Italian sausage and carrots. It had been a while and wow, I'd forgotten just how damned sharp that Chromax is!

    Image
    Sausage & Greens Soup
    This was a great use of a bunch of items from this morning's delivery, as well as two large bricks of chicken stock that were occupying some prime real estate in my freezer. And, the soup was really delicious. The sausage was spicy, the stock was rich, the veggies were sweet and the greens were bitter, so it ended up being nicely balanced. Winter is coming, so soup, stew and chili are going to be on our menu more and more, I think.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1395 - October 16th, 2020, 7:52 pm
    Post #1395 - October 16th, 2020, 7:52 pm Post #1395 - October 16th, 2020, 7:52 pm
    In 86 I was sous chef @ East Bank Club. Every Sunday after 7-800 brunches (which I personally would cook 300+ omelets for from 15 gallons of cracked eggs) I'd go through the 3 walk-ins and grab everything that had seen better days. It often was asst greens and trim from vegs. Add some potatoes and sausage and every Monday's soup of the day was 50 gallons of "Caldo de Portuguese".
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #1396 - October 17th, 2020, 7:04 am
    Post #1396 - October 17th, 2020, 7:04 am Post #1396 - October 17th, 2020, 7:04 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    Jazzfood wrote:I don't recall escabeche being involved, although there was some available on table w/the salsas. I remember beans, cheese melted w/a dollop of guac on top post broiler. Kamoosh w/Burrochoza was my go-to and sustained me for yrs.

    Damn it, yes. Guac on top. Even your memory is better than mine! :)

    =R=



    This is from Roadfood.com https://roadfood.com/topic/kamoosh-camuch/
    Interestingly the Guac goes under the cheese.


    I found this I found this article: Food For Thought: Guacamole and cheese ‘kamoosh’

    Terry Kay Bargar

    The first time I ever ate Mexican food was at a small and dingy joint on the northern fringes of Chicago.

    La Choza Restaurant was located near the Howard Street  El stop, close enough to my college campus yet far enough away that students felt like they were going  downtown. We didn t go to La Choza for the d�cor: plaster-cracked white walls, dirt- and mud-strewn floors, and plastic draped tables through which one could see colorful cloths and family photographs from  back home. No restaurant was more authentic than La Choza and its Spanish-speaking wait staff, an anomaly in the 1970s.

    The food at La Choza was incredibly delicious! I credit La Choza with turning me into the adventurous eater I am today.

    Sylvester, an Oaxacan native, owned and ran the restaurant. I think he cooked, too. His cuisine featured foods typical of Oaxaca, such as spicy mole. My friends would order mole on enchiladas, over steak and with chicken, but I really never relished mole sauce. My taste buds had not yet blossomed and I preferred dishes that were blander.

    For me, the winner on the menu was the kamoosh. Kamoosh was nirvana, a warmed plate of melted cheese on top of creamy avocado. It was Sylvester s inventive play on nachos. He called it  Mexico s threat to pizza. I ve never seen kamoosh on a menu anywhere else in any city in any country, not even in Mexico. For 30 years I ve tried to duplicate that tasty kamoosh, without success. Still, my version is  fant�stico!

    Terry s Kamoosh  La Choza

    Each kamoosh serves two to four people as an appetizer.

    Andover s threat to pizza? A flour tortilla  crust topped with layers of guacamole and cheese. This recipe tastes great, cooks quickly and is light on the budget. Toss one into the oven for a treat the whole family will love, especially the kids!

    For the guacamole:

    2 avocados

    1 large garlic clove

    1 small onion, quarters

    2 tomatoes, quartered

    2 limes (zested and juiced)

    1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

    1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

    Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

    1/4 cup fresh cilantro leaves

    1 jalapeno or serrano pepper, seeded and cut into chunks

    6 drops hot sauce (or more to taste)

    For the toppings:

    1 package flour tortillas, burrito size OR 1 package flax, oat bran & whole wheat flour lavash bread

    4 ounces queso blanco, shredded

    4 ounces sharp cheddar cheese, shredded

    1. Start by making the guacamole. For this recipe it is essential that the guacamole be perfectly smooth, so we re going to put all the ingredients into a food processor and puree it until it s just like velvet with no lumps or chunks. Cut open the avocado, remove the pits, and spoon out the fruit. Remember: Beauty doesn t count here! Now add the garlic clove, onion, tomatoes, lime zest and juice, cumin, salt, pepper, cilantro, jalapeno pepper and hot sauce. Put the cover on the work bowl and take it for a spin for about 30 seconds. Scrape down the sides and whiz it around again. When the guacamole is creamy smooth then it s done. Taste and add additional salt and pepper, if needed.

    2. Preheat your broiler to high. Place the tortilla (or lavash) on a baking sheet and lightly toast it under the broiler. Then flip it over and firm it up on the other side. Remove from the oven, but keep the oven on.

    3. Next, completely cover one side of the tortilla with guacamole  nice, thin layer going all the way to the edges. Think of a plasterer skim-coating the walls… we re looking for a beautiful green layer on top of the tortilla. Got it? Great.

    4. Evenly sprinkle an ounce each of queso blanco and cheddar on top of the guacamole.

    5. Place the baking sheet under the broiler and cook for four to five minutes or until the cheese is melted and is beginning to bubble. Remove from oven, and cut into small pieces with a pizza wheel. Eat while still warm. Share,14,309384.001,1,41931,71.226.223.217
    309384,309384,0,2007-06-24 13:42:39,Kamoosh/Camuch” which includes the Guac
  • Post #1397 - October 18th, 2020, 4:21 am
    Post #1397 - October 18th, 2020, 4:21 am Post #1397 - October 18th, 2020, 4:21 am
    Amazing how a little cheese, chorizo and a flour tortilla plus pan toasting = deliciousness.

    click on image to enlarge
    Image

    Quesadilla, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1398 - October 18th, 2020, 11:47 am
    Post #1398 - October 18th, 2020, 11:47 am Post #1398 - October 18th, 2020, 11:47 am
    G Wiv wrote:Amazing how a little cheese, chorizo and a flour tortilla plus pan toasting = deliciousness.

    Definitely greater than the sum of its parts. Your quesadilla looks delicious! :)

    Still working through the tadka dal, for brunch this morning I topped some of it off with a couple of sous vide eggs . . .

    Image
    Tadka Dal & Sous Vide Eggs, chives and cotija

    Eggs were cooked at 167F for 12 minutes, in their shells, directly in the water bath. I'd never done this before and it worked out pretty well. They poured out of their shells easily, cleanly and without any breakage. I prefer pan-cooked eggs (over-easy or sunny side-up) because that method allows for imparting more flavor. But as a method for poaching eggs, sous vide is a really great alternative.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1399 - October 18th, 2020, 1:47 pm
    Post #1399 - October 18th, 2020, 1:47 pm Post #1399 - October 18th, 2020, 1:47 pm
    JP1121 wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    Jazzfood wrote:I don't recall escabeche being involved, although there was some available on table w/the salsas. I remember beans, cheese melted w/a dollop of guac on top post broiler. Kamoosh w/Burrochoza was my go-to and sustained me for yrs.

    Damn it, yes. Guac on top. Even your memory is better than mine! :)

    =R=



    This is from Roadfood.com https://roadfood.com/topic/kamoosh-camuch/
    Interestingly the Guac goes under the cheese.


    I found this I found this article: Food For Thought: Guacamole and cheese ‘kamoosh’

    Terry Kay Bargar

    The first time I ever ate Mexican food was at a small and dingy joint on the northern fringes of Chicago.

    La Choza Restaurant was located near the Howard Street  El stop, close enough to my college campus yet far enough away that students felt like they were going  downtown. We didn t go to La Choza for the d�cor: plaster-cracked white walls, dirt- and mud-strewn floors, and plastic draped tables through which one could see colorful cloths and family photographs from  back home. No restaurant was more authentic than La Choza and its Spanish-speaking wait staff, an anomaly in the 1970s.


    For me, the winner on the menu was the kamoosh. Kamoosh was nirvana, a warmed plate of melted cheese on top of creamy avocado. It was Sylvester s inventive play on nachos. He called it  Mexico s threat to pizza. I ve never seen kamoosh on a menu anywhere else in any city in any country, not even in Mexico. For 30 years I ve tried to duplicate that tasty kamoosh, without success. Still, my version is  fant�stico!

    Terry s Kamoosh  La Choza


    While most of the memories jive w/mine, this is not how I remember this long gone iconic dish. This is Terry (the writer's) interpretation. Also don't recall flour tortillas and cumin but do remember refried beans being involved. If only...
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #1400 - October 18th, 2020, 3:36 pm
    Post #1400 - October 18th, 2020, 3:36 pm Post #1400 - October 18th, 2020, 3:36 pm
    I've gone quesadilla quazy. Chorizo, bacon, tomato, habanero, onion, cilantro, Oaxacan cheese, pan toasted flour tortilla.

    Click on image to enlarge
    Image

    Quesadilla, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1401 - October 18th, 2020, 7:32 pm
    Post #1401 - October 18th, 2020, 7:32 pm Post #1401 - October 18th, 2020, 7:32 pm
    Jazzfood wrote:
    JP1121 wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    Jazzfood wrote:I don't recall escabeche being involved, although there was some available on table w/the salsas. I remember beans, cheese melted w/a dollop of guac on top post broiler. Kamoosh w/Burrochoza was my go-to and sustained me for yrs.

    Damn it, yes. Guac on top. Even your memory is better than mine! :)


    This is from Roadfood.com https://roadfood.com/topic/kamoosh-camuch/
    Interestingly the Guac goes under the cheese.

    While most of the memories jive w/mine, this is not how I remember this long gone iconic dish. This is Terry (the writer's) interpretation. Also don't recall flour tortillas and cumin but do remember refried beans being involved. If only...

    Yeah, clearly memories fade. Thanks, JP, for the link. No one I've talked to about this seems to remember the guac being under the cheese but that doesn't mean it wasn't.

    G Wiv wrote:I've gone quesadilla quazy. Chorizo, bacon, tomato, habanero, onion, cilantro, Oaxacan cheese, pan toasted flour tortilla.

    I get it and am getting closer to joining you Quesadillaville but tonight I just circled the outskirts and made a long-time, pantry favorite of mine: Chorizo-Bean Dip . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Anryu Blue #2 Hammered Gyuto, 210mm
    Serranos, onions, garlic, poblano (only had one) and jalapenos. Really digging this ultra precise blade and getting used to its oval handle, which is not my favorite format. I seeded most of the chiles but left the ribs and seeds in a few of them to make sure there was some heat.

    Image
    Chorizo
    Sauteing it to render out some fat and crisp it up a bit.

    Image
    All In
    After the chorizo had rendered out a bit, in went the onions, chiles and garlic.

    Image
    Pantry Components
    Waaay back in the day, when I was a bachelor and first starting making this dish for myself, it was strictly comprised of these items, plus the raw chorizo and grated cheese. I mixed it all together, topped it with the cheese and baked it for an hour. Over the years it got a little more elaborate, via the inclusion of the fresh items and some preliminary cooking (as pictured above). Not sure I actually improved it one bit by making these changes but maybe I'll make it the old way again sometime soon and compare it.

    Image
    Baked Chorizo-Bean Dip
    Everthing mixed together, dumped into a 13 x 9" casserole, topped with grated chihuahua, cheddar and cotija. Baked for an hour at 350F, covered for the first 30 minutes.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With tortilla chips and warm flour tortillas (both El Milagro) and homemade escabeche.

    This dish really scratches the itch. My family is completely indifferent to it but sometimes -- maybe once a year -- I just have to make it for myself.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1402 - October 19th, 2020, 10:39 am
    Post #1402 - October 19th, 2020, 10:39 am Post #1402 - October 19th, 2020, 10:39 am
    "While most of the memories jive w/mine, this is not how I remember this long gone iconic dish. This is Terry (the writer's) interpretation. Also don't recall flour tortillas and cumin but do remember refried beans being involved. If only..."

    No worries, I ate there a bunch of times back in the day and the only thing I truly remember is that they would grab your beer when you walked in, take it in the back and serve it to you ice cold. Loved that place.
  • Post #1403 - October 19th, 2020, 7:58 pm
    Post #1403 - October 19th, 2020, 7:58 pm Post #1403 - October 19th, 2020, 7:58 pm
    More chicken thighs . . . and a clear-out of items from the CSA box, with a nice assist from the pantry. I don't mind cooking with some of the same ingredients a few weeks in a row. I end up having to incorporate items I probably wouldn't have bought for myself and by making repeated attempts with some of the same ingredients, I think I develop a better understanding of how best to use them.

    Tonight's dinner was a case in point. Until this rona mess started, I hadn't cooked a chicken-simmered-in-the-pan dish more than a half-dozen times in my whole life. But having done it repeatedly over the past few months, often with ingredients I wouldn't have necessarily chosen for myself, I'm beginning to understand what works for us and what doesn't . . .

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    Mise En Place & Sukenari ZDP189 Damascus Gyuto, 210mm
    Red onion, garlic and mini sweet peppers (these may have been the Nardellos again, I'm not entirely sure). Just a gorgeous and effective blade. My only issue with it is that it's so shiny, depending on where in my kitchen I'm working, it actually bounces light back in my eye, which can be blinding at times.

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    Chicken Thighs
    The Undisputed #1 Protein of the pandemic in our household. And it continues to show off its versatility, which seems unending. Gar-Pow, onion powder, salt, black pepper and oregano.

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    Seared Thighs
    A touch of evoo and a hot pan, these seared for a couple minutes on each side before I temporarily removed them.

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    Veggies
    Garlic, onions and peppers. After these cooked a while, I added some canned tomatoes and red wine.

    Image
    Spigariello
    The greens from broccoli rabe. At least, that's what I think these are, based on the email that preceded our CSA delivery. Tasting them raw, they were mostly bitter with a touch of sweet and a very pleasant finish. I figured that after the other vegetables had cooked a bit, I could throw them into the mix. The cooking medium clung to them very nicely, which allowed them to bring a lot of flavor into every bite of the finished dish.

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    Repositioning The Thighs
    Once the spigariello had softened up a bit, I put the seared thighs back in the pan, covered it and let everything simmer together for about an hour.

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    Finishing Up
    After an hour the chicken was FOB, so I removed it once again, turned up the heat and let everything reduce to thicken up.

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    Plated Up
    Chicken with peppers, onions, tomatoes & red wine (is this basically cacciatore?), garlic-braised bok choy with balsamic vinegar and crispy shallots.

    Happy Monday! :)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1404 - October 19th, 2020, 9:15 pm
    Post #1404 - October 19th, 2020, 9:15 pm Post #1404 - October 19th, 2020, 9:15 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:More chicken thighs . . .

    Thighs for me as well Mr. Suburban. Simple pan dish of thighs, rice, corn and veg. Browned thighs, sauteed veg, added it all to the pot with a little wine/water, cover, simmer, eat. Repeat.

    Dollop of KeeeeeenWah in background, made a small amount to test out a recipe.

    Click on image to enlarge
    Image

    Chicken Thighs, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1405 - October 20th, 2020, 7:20 am
    Post #1405 - October 20th, 2020, 7:20 am Post #1405 - October 20th, 2020, 7:20 am
    thigh me to the moon
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #1406 - October 20th, 2020, 7:39 am
    Post #1406 - October 20th, 2020, 7:39 am Post #1406 - October 20th, 2020, 7:39 am
    Seems to have been a night for chicken thighs: Thai Green Curry.

    The recipe called for pork, I've got pork plans for later this week (hint: pineapple was really cheap at Jewel over the weekend), so on my trip to JB Market I picked up some boneless thighs for this, along with Thai eggplants and a green curry paste (normally I make my own curry pastes, but for a Monday night dish, no).
    It's practically a dump-and-stir dish, the only real effort is slicing up the chicken: Coconut milk (the cream off the top first), curry paste, chicken, makrut leaves (homegrown), vegetables (substituted bamboo shoot for the pea-eggplant or peas), balance with fish sauce and brown sugar, finish with basil leaves and sliced jalapeno (both homegrown). Chicken was tender as can be, big fan of the meat department at JB.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #1407 - October 21st, 2020, 12:10 pm
    Post #1407 - October 21st, 2020, 12:10 pm Post #1407 - October 21st, 2020, 12:10 pm
    Took advantage of a side of leftover broccoli from last night's delivered dinner and some nice sunlight (finally!) to make -- and get a pic of -- today's lunch . . .

    Image
    Broccoli, Red Onion & Cheddar Omelet

    The bread molded, so no toast today. :(

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1408 - October 21st, 2020, 6:47 pm
    Post #1408 - October 21st, 2020, 6:47 pm Post #1408 - October 21st, 2020, 6:47 pm
    Finished up the A-5 tonight and had an unexpected treat with it . . .

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    Green Zebra Tomatoes & Sukenari ZDP189 Damascus Gyuto, 210mm
    Went out to the garden today to clean up the tomato plants for the winter and found 2 big beauties hiding along the fence behind some broad leaves. They were just great and the knife, which I'm getting acquainted with, slid right through them. I was just hacking to get dinner on the table but it was clear to me that this knife could have turned these tomatoes into uniform sheets of paper.

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    Plated Up
    Pan-seared A-5 wagyu, homemade coleslaw, Mrs. Suburban's 'Signature' roasted cauliflower, green zebras and rendering-cooked onions.

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    Interior
    The epitome of unctuous.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1409 - October 22nd, 2020, 7:10 pm
    Post #1409 - October 22nd, 2020, 7:10 pm Post #1409 - October 22nd, 2020, 7:10 pm
    Was inspired by this youtube video to take a shot at Chile Verde Pork Stew . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Sukenari Damascus ZDP 189 Gyuto, 210mm
    Salt, flour, jalapeno, black pepper, cumin, chicken broth, hatch chiles, Mexican oregano, cilantro, pork shoulder, garlic, onion and roasted poblano peppers (eventually all peeled and seeded). I guess the Sukenari has become the knife of the week.

    Image
    Blender
    Joining the chicken broth in the blender were 4 of the 6 roasted poblanos, the jalapenos, the hatch chiles and the cilantro, stems and all.

    Image
    Seasoned Pork
    Meanwhile, the pork is seasoned with the salt and minced garlic.

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    Seared Pork
    After the pork is browned in a touch of oil, the onions are added and allowed to sweat for a minute or two. After that, the black pepper, cumin and flour are added and allowed to cook until the flour forms a kind of roux.

    Image
    Simmering
    Next up, the blended components are added and brought to low boil. Once boiling, the last 2 of the 6 roasted poblanos -- now coarsely diced -- are added and the whole business is simmered until the pork's tender and/or until it all thickens to your liking. With pieces this small, the softening didn't take very long, about 40 minutes. At that point, it was still a bit liquidy, so I let it simmer for another 30 minutes, which did not adversely affect the pork. At the very end, after the heat is turned off, the oregano is added.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With flour tortillas, garnished with cilantro and cotija (there was also a nice green salad, which I neglected to shoot). Super satisfying and easy-to-prepare cold weather dish. The intensely cilantro-forward chile verde reminded me a lot of the aguadito they serve at D'Candela. The hardest step of the prep was cleaning up the roasted poblanos, a task I find tedious. Nonetheless, I think this one's going in the regular rotation for the next few months. It was really tasty.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1410 - October 23rd, 2020, 6:02 pm
    Post #1410 - October 23rd, 2020, 6:02 pm Post #1410 - October 23rd, 2020, 6:02 pm
    annak wrote:Does anyone have a Butternut Squash Lasagna recipe they're really in to? I am thinking: roasting cubes of squash, pureeing, browning ground pork, folding in to puree, layering with noodles and ricotta-egg-mozz mixture, but would take input otherwise if people had béchamel ideas etc. October dinners, incoming!

    My sister dropped off almost two pounds of cooked unseasoned butternut squash. I was thinking gnocchi, then decided upon a lasagna, instead.

    I used this recipe sorta for BUTTERNUT SQUASH, CARAMELIZED ONION AND MUSHROOM LASAGNA. Here are the adjustments I made:
    - I did not use any mozzarella, because I felt a quart of bechamel sauce was quite enough. I used 4 tablespoons flour to four tablespoons butter with four cups milk. I debated making a thicker sauce, though after I saw the finished product. It did not need more thickening.
    - I did not add any goat cheese. I always have feta, but I just could not see any reason to add it.
    - I used regular grocery store mushrooms.
    - I never seasoned the butternut squash. It arrived mashed up. I never added milk or took my stick blender to it. It was texture of mashed potatoes.
    - I cooked the onions down first. It went slower than I wished to tolerate, so I added a pinch of sugar to speed along the caramelizing. After the onions were cooked, I removed them and cooked the mushrooms in the same pan.

    The finished lasagna had half of the butternut squash on the bottom, onions and mushrooms in the middle, and the remaining squash. The sweet and savory nature of these layers made a nice contrast.

    We liked it. You can make what you want of this recipe or sorta follow it like me.

    Regards,
    CAthy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
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