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Corona cuisine / Social distancing cooking
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  • Post #1441 - October 31st, 2020, 7:16 am
    Post #1441 - October 31st, 2020, 7:16 am Post #1441 - October 31st, 2020, 7:16 am
    For her birthday dinner, Jennie asked for a dish that is one of the first 'fancy' meals I made from one of the first 'fancy' cookbooks I bought in the late 70's. Marcella Hazan's 'Classic Italian Cooking'. She calls the dish 'Fettine Di Manzo Farcite'. This dish is as easy as it gets, but really good.
    ImageI had the butcher cut 4 matching pieces of 1/4 inch top round. I matched them up and trimmed to a perfect match. On one I put salt, pepper, a couple of thin slices of fontina cheese and a thin slice of prosciutto. ( as much as I have come to hate Mariano's, you can't beat the quality/price of their deli cut Levoni Prosciutto ).
    ImageLay on the top slice of beef and dip in flour then egg and then fine breadcrumbs. Fry in oil for a few minutes on each side.

    With a main course like this, a required side is Best Roast Potatoes: https://www.seriouseats.com/2016/12/the ... -ever.html .
  • Post #1442 - November 1st, 2020, 8:33 pm
    Post #1442 - November 1st, 2020, 8:33 pm Post #1442 - November 1st, 2020, 8:33 pm
    lougord99 wrote:Marcella Hazan's 'Classic Italian Cooking'. She calls the dish 'Fettine Di Manzo Farcite'. This dish is as easy as it gets, but really good.

    Really nice looking dish, Lou.

    I took a couple days off from cooking dinner (and btw, delivery really sucks) but jumped back in with another dish I'd never tried cooking before: birria. Apparently, this has been a very popular dish across the internet for the past several months. For me, the attempt was mainly driven by curiosity and the possibly irrational belief that it was easier to cook it myself than it would have been to drive 75 miles round trip to Birrieria Zaragoza to get the very best. In the end, mine -- an amalgamation of several recipes, online and otherwise -- didn't come close to theirs but it was still delicious and well worth the effort . . .

    Day 1
    Image
    Stemming & Seeding Dried Chilis
    I love it when the weather allows me easily do this outside because it really spares my kitchen some unnecessary mess. I used guajillo, ancho and a few arbol.

    Image
    Mise En Place
    Seasonings (black peppercorns, cloves, cassia bark, salt, Mexican oregano, cumin seeds and bay leaf), garlic and prepped/dried chilis. Not pictured here is a whole, roughly chopped white onion.

    Image
    Toasting The Chilis
    Just a few seconds, dry, over medium heat. If they burn, they get bitter.

    Image
    Toasting The Spices
    Everything but the salt. Just until they become frargrant.

    Image
    Grinding The Spices
    Added the salt here, which really helped abrade the whole business.

    Image
    Spice Paste
    It went quickly, so I think I'm actually getting better at this task, too.

    Image
    Blender
    At this point, the ground spices, the toasted chilis (which rehydrated in hot water for ~20 minutes), the chili soaking water and the aforementioned, roughly chopped white onion get buzzed into a smooth paste.

    Image
    Meat Marinating
    I wasn't able to get goat, so I used lamb (some leg and some ribs). I cut it into 4" chunks (and 3-rib sections), put it in a zipper bag and poured the marinade over it. From there it went into the fridge overnight.

    Day 2
    Image
    Sachet
    Really just a packet to help amplify the seasonings already present. No toasting this time. I just tied this up and eventually threw it into the braise, which was comprised of all the paste, a bit of water I used to get all the paste out of the bag and some beef stock.

    Image
    Searing
    Meat removed from the bag, I wiped off (and reserved) as much of the marinade paste as I could and seared all the pieces for a few minutes.

    Image
    Braise
    Once seared, I put all the meat back in the pot, added a quart of beef stock, covered it and let it cook for a few hours. At some point later, I dumped in a few cherry tomatoes because I had them but I don't think it was really necessary.

    Image
    Rendered Fat
    After a long braise, the meat was totally tender and I was able to skim nearly a cup of fat off the top of the pot. I reserved this for an upcoming step.

    I decided by bypass the serve it as a stew step and went directly for birria quesadillas . . .

    Image
    In The Pan
    Tortillas (corn or flour, we used both but this one is flour) get dipped in broth, then dipped in the rendered fat and dropped into a hot pan. From there, a layer of cheese goes on (we used chihuahua and cotija), followed by some of the shredded birria, some freshly chopped onions and cilantro, and another layer of cheese.

    Image
    Folded Over
    Once the tortilla starts to crisp up, fold it over and let in continue to cook in the pan until it's suitably melty.

    Image
    Trio Of Smaller Quesadillas
    With these smaller tortillas, I was able to cook 3 at a time.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With black beans, some Mexican-style rice (both of which I made during the braise) and, most importantly, a ramekin of the broth (aka consome) for dipping.

    Going in, I really thought the corn tortillas would be my favorites but we all preferred the flour. As strong as lamb can be, it got a bit lost in the quesadillas I made with the corn tortillas. Of course, with grocery tortillas, who really knows. With well made tortillas, the story may have been different. In any case, this was a really enjoyable dinner and I'm glad I took the time to hack it out.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1443 - November 1st, 2020, 10:57 pm
    Post #1443 - November 1st, 2020, 10:57 pm Post #1443 - November 1st, 2020, 10:57 pm
    All the work you put in, give yourself some guacamole! It would take the salsa from heaven for me to not wish for some avocado.

    If you go to the trouble again, you might find that the sweet spot for melting cheese is best met with Oaxacan.
  • Post #1444 - November 1st, 2020, 11:28 pm
    Post #1444 - November 1st, 2020, 11:28 pm Post #1444 - November 1st, 2020, 11:28 pm
    bweiny wrote:All the work you put in, give yourself some guacamole! It would take the salsa from heaven for me to not wish for some avocado.

    If you go to the trouble again, you might find that the sweet spot for melting cheese is best met with Oaxacan.

    Having never had guacamole with birria, it never crossed my mind. But either way, I was pretty wiped (was also juggling some household tasks), so even if I had thought of it, it probably wouldn't have happened. We almost always have avocados on hand, though. Mrs. Suburban eats a lot of them.

    Love the Oaxacan cheese (and boy, do I miss Cemitas Puebla) but had none on hand and was just trying to work through the chihuahua. If there's still birria left when I shop at the end of the week, I hope to pick some up.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1445 - November 2nd, 2020, 8:19 am
    Post #1445 - November 2nd, 2020, 8:19 am Post #1445 - November 2nd, 2020, 8:19 am
    ImageFor us, this is as good as it gets.

    Made a classic jerk marinade pulsed in the blender of green onion, habanero, garlic, frsh thyme, ground allspice, black pepper, ground cinnamon, nutmeg, salt, brown sugar, soy sauce and lime juice.

    Coated the wings and put in sous vide at 177 for 2 hours. The wings give off a fair amount of liquid while cooking. So, took the wings out and boiled off the excess liquid. Put the wings under the broiler, topping with reduced jerk sauce until browned in places. Served with roasted potatoes.
  • Post #1446 - November 2nd, 2020, 11:30 am
    Post #1446 - November 2nd, 2020, 11:30 am Post #1446 - November 2nd, 2020, 11:30 am
    lougord99 wrote:Coated the wings and put in sous vide at 177 for 2 hours.

    How did that work out? I'm really curious about cooking chicken in the IC but I've never done it. Was that enough time for them to get tender or were they only cooked through? With wings being very unflat, were you able to get them sealed in a bag that didn't have a lot of air in it? If not, how did you weigh the bag down?

    Forgot to post this 'clean out the fridge' frittata from over the weekend . . .

    Image
    Kitchen Sink Frittata
    Leftover Italian sausage, leftover roasted cauliflower, leftover sauteed onions & peppers, and a couple of different cheeses. Alongside is half of a relatively unconventional everything bagel (toasted) from Superkhana International. It had fennel seeds, which I'd never experience before on a bagel.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1447 - November 2nd, 2020, 11:47 am
    Post #1447 - November 2nd, 2020, 11:47 am Post #1447 - November 2nd, 2020, 11:47 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    lougord99 wrote:Coated the wings and put in sous vide at 177 for 2 hours.
    With wings being very unflat, were you able to get them sealed in a bag that didn't have a lot of air in it? If not, how did you weigh the bag down?=R=


    The way to get the air out is to use a ziplock and slowly submerge, displacing the air. when you get to the top, just seal it. I seal it prior to submerge and then open it up an couple inches and close it completely once nearly submerged.
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #1448 - November 2nd, 2020, 12:00 pm
    Post #1448 - November 2nd, 2020, 12:00 pm Post #1448 - November 2nd, 2020, 12:00 pm
    Jazzfood wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    lougord99 wrote:Coated the wings and put in sous vide at 177 for 2 hours.
    With wings being very unflat, were you able to get them sealed in a bag that didn't have a lot of air in it? If not, how did you weigh the bag down?=R=


    The way to get the air out is to use a ziplock and slowly submerge, displacing the air. when you get to the top, just seal it. I seal it prior to submerge and then open it up an couple inches and close it completely once nearly submerged.

    If you only use a ziploc to cook in an immersion circulator, you'll likely end up with waterlogged, soggy mess. And the method you describe wouldn't work with a foodsaver. Do you double bag after the ziploc?

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1449 - November 2nd, 2020, 12:37 pm
    Post #1449 - November 2nd, 2020, 12:37 pm Post #1449 - November 2nd, 2020, 12:37 pm
    I don't double bag and the only time I've had "leakage" was @ higher temp for longer time. A couple hrs are fine.
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #1450 - November 2nd, 2020, 2:43 pm
    Post #1450 - November 2nd, 2020, 2:43 pm Post #1450 - November 2nd, 2020, 2:43 pm
    I usually use the Foodsaver for sous vide, but occasionally I'll be doing veggies at about 185° and also want to do a protein sous vide at the same time. In that case, I use a ziplock with the submersion technique, with a remote thermometer stuck into the meat. The thermometer wire peeks out of the top of the ziplock bag, which I clip to the side of the pot so that just the top of the bag is above the water level (sometimes I have to add a weight, like a dinner knife, inside the bag, to keep the protein from floating). I know it's probably not ideal sousviding for the protein, but I can get it to a desired temp, and no water gets in the bag.

    If I weren't such a cheap bastard, I'd get a separate sous vide circulator and just cook the proteins and veg separately, each at their appropriate temps, but I am cheap.
  • Post #1451 - November 2nd, 2020, 2:54 pm
    Post #1451 - November 2nd, 2020, 2:54 pm Post #1451 - November 2nd, 2020, 2:54 pm
    Alan, Tom:

    I find that the seals on ziploc bags fail regularly, even when they're not submerged in circulating water. I wouldn't even want try it, unless I could securely fasten the closure well above the water line. I recently invested ~$60 on a Waring Commercial Pistol Vacuum Sealing System and while it's superior to the Foodsaver in many ways, I'm still not sure I'd trust it for sous vide applications.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1452 - November 2nd, 2020, 2:59 pm
    Post #1452 - November 2nd, 2020, 2:59 pm Post #1452 - November 2nd, 2020, 2:59 pm
    I get your concern but have used it dozens of times w/the submerge technique w/only 1 failure as mentioned which was chuck roast for 18 hrs @ a higher temp where the bag kinda disintegrated. Also have used a bag clip for the side w/(as you mention) the closure above the waterline. No need to weight. But that's just moi.
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #1453 - November 2nd, 2020, 3:04 pm
    Post #1453 - November 2nd, 2020, 3:04 pm Post #1453 - November 2nd, 2020, 3:04 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:I'm still not sure I'd trust it for sous vide applications.

    Distinction without a difference. Forget hot tub "cooking"

    Fire & Flame, the way Ross Demarkovitz intended.

    Culinary Luddite, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1454 - November 2nd, 2020, 3:06 pm
    Post #1454 - November 2nd, 2020, 3:06 pm Post #1454 - November 2nd, 2020, 3:06 pm
    Should mention I'm using ziplock gallon freezer bags, not smaller sandwich.
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #1455 - November 2nd, 2020, 7:13 pm
    Post #1455 - November 2nd, 2020, 7:13 pm Post #1455 - November 2nd, 2020, 7:13 pm
    I think tonight was the fourth or fifth meal we've extracted from the brisket I cooked last Monday. Sometimes, especially with certain braises like brisket, the leftovers are even better than the initial cook . . .

    Image
    Plated Up
    Leftover brisket WORLA*, homemade coleslaw and roasted vegetable medley (broccoli, cauliflower & cherry tomatoes).

    Yes, there are some differences but at the end of the day, there's not a ton of distance between brisket and birria (big hunks of meat braised in pepper-based media). When you really think about it, brisket is kind of like Jewish birria. :lol:

    In any case, going back over the meals I've made lately, it's time to ease up on the braises. It's only early November and I've been hitting them hard. I'm in danger of burning out on them before Thanksgiving. Beyond that, they produce such ample leftovers, they reduce my overall cooking opportunities. That's something I'd also like to avoid for now.

    Happy Monday! :)

    =R=

    *with other random leftovers added
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1456 - November 2nd, 2020, 7:35 pm
    Post #1456 - November 2nd, 2020, 7:35 pm Post #1456 - November 2nd, 2020, 7:35 pm
    Brisket leftovers are the gift that keeps on giving. It freezes and thaws nicely, and either a rewarming (oven or micro) or quick crisping on the griddle expands its usefulness. I've probably got 4 or 5 meals worth of brisket in the freezer right now, all from pre-pandemic.

    On the other hand, tonight's meal was mostly new ingredients: Afghan Pumpkin with beef and yogurt. I had to run out to get fresh mint (called Mariano's and sure enough, they're out again -- they're terrible about fresh herbs), and picked up a couple premade naan too. I'd bought a butternut squash on Saturday, and wasn't sure what I'd do with it until Afghani pumpkin came to mind just before lunch. The only leftover that went in was a cup of sliced onions from Choong Man Snow Chicken, browned. This was joined with 1.5 tsp ginger, 1/2 tsp turmeric and one of the last jalapenos from my garden, then 4C cubed squash and about a half can of chicken broth.

    While that simmers, sauteed a big clove of garlic with 8oz ground beef until nicely browned, to which I added an 8oz can of tomato sauce (diced would have been better, but didn't want to leave a half can around), and about 2tsp coriander (the recipe called for 1/4tsp!?!) salt and pepper.

    While that simmered down to a nice paste, chop small handful of fresh mint and another clove of garlic into 1/2C whole-milk yogurt, season.

    Serve in layers: pumpkin, then beef, then yogurt, then more mint leaves. A lot more subtle than most Indian curries, perfect for fall, and all told about 45-50 minutes.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #1457 - November 2nd, 2020, 8:28 pm
    Post #1457 - November 2nd, 2020, 8:28 pm Post #1457 - November 2nd, 2020, 8:28 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    lougord99 wrote:Coated the wings and put in sous vide at 177 for 2 hours.

    How did that work out? I'm really curious about cooking chicken in the IC but I've never done it. Was that enough time for them to get tender or were they only cooked through? With wings being very unflat, were you able to get them sealed in a bag that didn't have a lot of air in it? If not, how did you weigh the bag down?
    =R=

    Well, I seem to be a little late to the conversation, but here goes.

    2 hours made them very tender. This was at 177 which is as hot as I ever do sous vide. I have made this many times.

    As long as you use freezer bags and not storage bags, zip locks are fine for sous vide. I've probably used them 20-30 times and do not recall a closure failure. If I am doing a long hot cook ( pork for 24 hours ) I will use the food saver, but otherwise I use zip locks and use the displacement method for getting rid of air. The displacement method never gets rid of all the air and I use binder clips on the edges ( https://www.amazon.com/Coofficer-Binder ... 046&sr=8-7 ) and put soup spoons through the top of the clips. I keep a supply of binder clips in the kitchen drawer.
    Last edited by lougord99 on November 2nd, 2020, 8:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #1458 - November 3rd, 2020, 7:45 pm
    Post #1458 - November 3rd, 2020, 7:45 pm Post #1458 - November 3rd, 2020, 7:45 pm
    lougord99 wrote:Well, I seem to be a little late to the conversation, but here goes . . .

    Thanks, Lou. I appreciate it. I keep a stash of binder clips in my kitchen, too. Sounds like they have limitless uses.

    For us, it was Round 2 of the birria tonight, with a more orthodox serving approach . . .

    Image
    Condiments
    Cabbage, Mexican oregano, red onion, lime and cilantro.

    Image
    Plated Up
    It's hard to surpass the gooey-cheesey quesadillas we made the other night but because this meat sat in the broth for a couple of days, the flavor was out of this world.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1459 - November 4th, 2020, 10:08 am
    Post #1459 - November 4th, 2020, 10:08 am Post #1459 - November 4th, 2020, 10:08 am
    (Yesterday/National Sandwich Day, 11.3.20)
    Hot dog Quesadilla for National Sandwich Day Split Fresh Farms Niles pork/veal wieners, natural casing of course, white American, jalapeno, onion last of the garden arugula. Liberal dousing of Valentina Hot Sauce not pictured.

    click on image to enlarge
    Image
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    Quesadilla, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1460 - November 4th, 2020, 11:20 am
    Post #1460 - November 4th, 2020, 11:20 am Post #1460 - November 4th, 2020, 11:20 am
    Hi,

    I wish there was a video clip of Gary eating this hot dog prep variations. I can envision those hot dogs rolling around while he was aiming to eat them.

    I will have to play this in my imagination or attempt to serve my Dad.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #1461 - November 4th, 2020, 11:50 am
    Post #1461 - November 4th, 2020, 11:50 am Post #1461 - November 4th, 2020, 11:50 am
    Cathy2 wrote:I can envision those hot dogs rolling around while he was aiming to eat them.

    No wiener rolling. I lightly simmered the dogs, patted dry, sliced in half length wise. Cut side on the cheese which anchored the dogs nicely. Tasty, I also added a sprinkle of everything bagel seasoning, which I neglected to mention.

    Just noticed the dogs in the pic are jumbled around, that's because I wanted to get a shot of the toasty outside. I repositioned before eating.

    Quesadilla fillings are limited only by ones imagination.
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1462 - November 4th, 2020, 7:48 pm
    Post #1462 - November 4th, 2020, 7:48 pm Post #1462 - November 4th, 2020, 7:48 pm
    G Wiv wrote:No wiener rolling.

    Phew! That can be quite painful when done incorrectly. :P
    G Wiv wrote:Quesadilla fillings are limited only by ones imagination.

    Definitely . . . and the capacity of the tortilla, which often seems to trip me up. I do loves me some quesadillas, though.

    Dinner 101 over here tonight. At this point, it's probably one I could cook with my eyes closed and one hand tied behind my back. Still, effort doesn't always equate with satisfaction, so this had a high reward to effort ratio . . .

    Image
    Broccolini & Kohetsu Addict Gyuto, 240mm
    A bit of overkill on the broccolini trimming but I love this knife for garlic, both smashing it and mincing it.

    Image
    Saute Into Steam
    After a quick browning of some minced garlic and shallots in evoo, I dropped in the broccolini and let it get a bit of color. After that, quick splashes of water and red wine vinegar. Cover until just about soft, then uncover and crank the heat until the liquid almost disappears. Then another small splash of the vinegar and a pinch of red chili flakes before serving.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Charcoal-grilled chicken thighs, homemade coleslaw and broccolini.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1463 - November 4th, 2020, 8:41 pm
    Post #1463 - November 4th, 2020, 8:41 pm Post #1463 - November 4th, 2020, 8:41 pm
    trying to keep busy yesterday and in anticipation of a hard day today i made middle eastern lentil soup to have tonight. lentils, chicken stock, carrot, onion, garlic turmeric, cumin, bay, and actually tried it in the slow cooker, which worked well. served with sourdough sharp cheddar grilled cheese sandwiches, it was a nice meal.
  • Post #1464 - November 5th, 2020, 2:19 am
    Post #1464 - November 5th, 2020, 2:19 am Post #1464 - November 5th, 2020, 2:19 am
    Today was one of those days where I looked to use up things from my refrigerator.

    This year, we had a bumper crop of okra here in Arizona. Generally, when we plant things after March, they start to grow BUT they never really produce more fruit. The okra plants did exactly that. However, ONE plant grew to four feet tall and started putting off tons of fruit. Then the others joined in. It has been great to have a lot of okra since I can not buy that in most supermarkets around here.

    We have been doing a lot of fried okra and of course roasted okra. Today, I wanted to make soup.

    Easy Gumbo Okra Soup
    https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/25789 ... okra-soup/

    I would not recommend this recipe for one major reason. It calls for 1 TBSP of red pepper flakes for four servings. I used 1 tsp and that amount was a bit too much. Had I added the full amount, the soup would have been inedible.

    Also, I do not understand the need to use grape tomatoes for the recipe and then 1/4 cup of crushed tomatoes. Why would you open up a can of crushed tomatoes for that amount. Instead, I used whole tomatoes to use up what I have in the refrigerator.

    When i was in Cincinnati late last year, I purchased 3# of Louisiana corn meal that I have been trying to use up. Today, I decided to make cornbread from scratch. Here is the recipe:

    Grandmother's Buttermilk Cornbread
    https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/76594 ... cornbread/

    This turned out really well and was one of the best cornbread that I have produced. It is highly recommended if you like sweeter cornbread.
  • Post #1465 - November 5th, 2020, 9:30 am
    Post #1465 - November 5th, 2020, 9:30 am Post #1465 - November 5th, 2020, 9:30 am
    Annak: I made Syrian red lentil soup two days ago, my friend's recipe, basically the same as yours :)
    Being gauche rocks, stun the bourgeoisie
  • Post #1466 - November 6th, 2020, 2:22 am
    Post #1466 - November 6th, 2020, 2:22 am Post #1466 - November 6th, 2020, 2:22 am
    Lunch and dinner with leftover curry rub chicken on the chicken hook. Quesadilla lunch, no picture, creamed chicken over egg noodles topped with crunchy spiced almonds and Valentina hot sauce for dinner.

    click on image to enlarge
    Image

    Chicken, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1467 - November 6th, 2020, 5:54 pm
    Post #1467 - November 6th, 2020, 5:54 pm Post #1467 - November 6th, 2020, 5:54 pm
    G Wiv wrote:Chicken, count me a Fan!

    Me, too . . . you might be surprised to know. :wink:

    Dinner tonight will be the last, hopefully, of the leftover brisket that I originally cooked 12 days ago. I've loved it a long time but I'm ready to move on.

    For lunch today, I continued working through a pot of beautiful black beans (from Three Sisters Garden) that I cooked earlier in the week . . .

    Image
    Black Beans & Over-Easy Eggs
    With fresh chives and cotija.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1468 - November 7th, 2020, 8:39 am
    Post #1468 - November 7th, 2020, 8:39 am Post #1468 - November 7th, 2020, 8:39 am
    Beef Stew with marrow bones, bit of heat. Tasty.

    click on image to enlarge
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    Beef Stew, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1469 - November 7th, 2020, 2:04 pm
    Post #1469 - November 7th, 2020, 2:04 pm Post #1469 - November 7th, 2020, 2:04 pm
    G Wiv wrote:Beef Stew, count me a Fan!

    I think I see potatoes in there. What other veg? Were there parsnips? Looks delicious.

    A couple of smaller tasks so far today. First, coleslaw coming . . .

    Image
    Cabbage & Kohetsu Addict Gyuto, Blue #2, 240mm

    I just can't get enough of this nimble beast of a knife. It's hefty but with an edge and geometry that allows for some really easy, delicate cuts.

    For brunch, a tasty omelet with leftover chorizo-bean dip and cheese . . .

    Image
    Chorizo-Bean Dip Omelet with Assorted Cheeses

    Once it warmed up, the filling was pretty loose, so I didn't exactly stick the landing but it was delicious nonetheless.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1470 - November 7th, 2020, 4:25 pm
    Post #1470 - November 7th, 2020, 4:25 pm Post #1470 - November 7th, 2020, 4:25 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:I think I see potatoes in there. What other veg? Were there parsnips? Looks delicious.

    Beef chuck roast cut, marrow bones, seared. Carrot, celery, onion, turnip, parsnip, fresh garlic, bay leaf, whole allspice, whole white and black peppercorn, half-sharp paprika, guajillo, salt, one (just one) juniper berry, oregano (dry), thyme (fresh). Water, red wine, glop of Better Than Bouillon no chicken chicken base, lots of stuff, probably forgetting something. Potatoes way at the end.

    Tastes even better today.

    ronnie_suburban wrote:I just can't get enough of this nimble beast of a knife.
    You sure we are talking about a knife?
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow

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