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Corona cuisine / Social distancing cooking
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  • Post #1471 - November 7th, 2020, 11:28 pm
    Post #1471 - November 7th, 2020, 11:28 pm Post #1471 - November 7th, 2020, 11:28 pm
    G Wiv wrote:Tastes even better today.

    Always, right? Very nice.

    Saturday night, steakhousey-type dinner tonight. Surprisingly, we had a little bit of late-season spinach from our CSA box, as well as some shiitakes. Decided to throw together a creamed spinach that was actually more shiitake than spinach . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Yu Kurosaki Sasame Petty, 120mm
    Garlic, shallot & onion, wilted spinach and shiitakes. It was nice to use this knife, which is especially great on the small stuff. It'd been a couple of months.

    Image
    Saute Progression
    Hot pan, a splash of evoo and a few of the shiitakes, followed by the onions, shallots and the remainder of the shiitakes. After that was all in and had softened a bit, I sprinkled about a tablespoon of flour in to make it sort of roux-like

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    Cream & Wine
    Once the flour had cooked, I added half-cups each of cream and white wine. It simmered briefly, after which it began to thicken.

    Image
    Spinach
    In addition to having wilted it, I also squeezed the begeezus out of the spinach to remove as much of the moisture as I could. I ended up with a ball of very dry spinach a little bit smaller than my fist, which I added back to the pan.

    Image
    Casserolification
    This was an early prep since we weren't going to be eating it until later on (wanted to get it ready before socializing). For that reason, I put it in this baker, figuring it'd be the easiest way to reheat it before dinner.

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    Charcoal-Grilled Flatiron Steak & Masomoto KS
    Absolutely loving this knife now that it's been re-handled. That original "D" handle was problematic for this lefty.

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    Flatiron
    I waited my usual 10 minutes to slice it but maybe I should have given it a bit more time since there was quite a bit of juice still coming out of it. It was still plenty moist, though.

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    Plated Up
    With creamed spinach & shiitakes and homemade coleslaw.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1472 - November 8th, 2020, 8:12 pm
    Post #1472 - November 8th, 2020, 8:12 pm Post #1472 - November 8th, 2020, 8:12 pm
    I was locked in on a pot of chili. The fact that it was over 70F here today didn't change my course. Glad I stuck with it, as it turned out really well . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place
    Jalapenos, poblanos & serranos, toasted & soaked chiles (guajillo, ancho and arbol -- later buzzed and sieved), canned tomatoes, cubed chuck roast, Rotel original, leftover homemade black beans, onions, ancho chile powder, cayenne pepper and garlic.

    Image
    Konosuke Fujiyama FM Blue #2 Gyuto, ebony, 210mm
    Normally, if I forget to include the knife I'm using in my shots, I just move on without it. But this knife is such a high performer, I had to go back and take a picture of it. What a joy to use.

    Really standard prep -- browned the salted, peppered and cumined meat in a touch of evoo and removed it, then sweated the onions, fresh chiles and garlic long enough to release the fond. After that, added all the tomatoes and the sieved paste I made from the dried chiles. Next, the browned meat went back in, along with salt, pepper, the chile powders, some freshly ground cumin and a bay leaf.

    Cover and simmer low for a couple of hours. Since they were already cooked, I waited until there was about 30 minutes to go and added in a heaping cup of the leftover black beans. Once the meat was tender, we ate. It was really flavorful but I know it'll be even better tomorrow. A few years back, a friend turned me on to using cubed meat instead of ground and I'm a true convert.

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    Plated Up
    Was going to make a pan of cornbread but before I could get to that, a friend dropped off part of a home-baked loaf, so we wisely opted for that instead.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1473 - November 9th, 2020, 8:47 am
    Post #1473 - November 9th, 2020, 8:47 am Post #1473 - November 9th, 2020, 8:47 am
    Looks great. The Texans may gripe about the beans, but not me. If nothing else, it's a shortcut to thickening any liquid, and beans are just good. Speaking of which, anything in the braising liquid besides the tomato? I usually find a beer in the back of the fridge or the dregs of a bottle of red. Definitely applaud the use of cubed meat. I've been meaning to try one with a real long braise of big cubes and then shred.
    Trying to think of what else goes in mine:
    * a little masa flour to help thicken
    * oregano
    * cocoa powder or a wedge of Mexican chocolate
    * splash of cider vinegar
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #1474 - November 9th, 2020, 9:06 am
    Post #1474 - November 9th, 2020, 9:06 am Post #1474 - November 9th, 2020, 9:06 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:friend dropped off part of a home-baked loaf

    Like at Blackbird's upstairs party room circa long-time-ago?

    Chili looks great, really nice! I did a bone-in pork roast on the kettle with curry rub. Not the best pics I've taken but turned out tasty. Brought over to the neighbors who we ate with.

    click to enlarge
    Image
    Image

    Pork roast, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1475 - November 9th, 2020, 10:05 am
    Post #1475 - November 9th, 2020, 10:05 am Post #1475 - November 9th, 2020, 10:05 am
    JoelF wrote:Looks great. The Texans may gripe about the beans, but not me. If nothing else, it's a shortcut to thickening any liquid, and beans are just good. Speaking of which, anything in the braising liquid besides the tomato? I usually find a beer in the back of the fridge or the dregs of a bottle of red. Definitely applaud the use of cubed meat. I've been meaning to try one with a real long braise of big cubes and then shred.
    Trying to think of what else goes in mine:
    * a little masa flour to help thicken
    * oregano
    * cocoa powder or a wedge of Mexican chocolate
    * splash of cider vinegar

    All sounds good, Joel. I've probably never made chili the exact same way twice, so I'm always up for varying it, depending on my mood and what I have on hand. I like beans in chili but I'm also fine without them. In this case, I had a really nice batch of homemade black beans on hand, so I was eager to include them. If I hadn't, I wouldn't have opened a can to make it happen.

    I almost always include cumin (as I did this time) but since I'd just made birria, seasoning-wise, I wanted to steer this in a slightly different direction. I found myself reaching for the Mexican oregano before remembering that I didn't want to include it. Between the tomato liquid, the moisture from the onions and fresh chiles and the reconstituted dried chile paste, that was plenty of liquid, so no additional cooking medium this time around. I do have a puck of unsweetened Mexican chocolate, so not including that was definitely a missed bet. Next time.

    G Wiv wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:friend dropped off part of a home-baked loaf

    Like at Blackbird's upstairs party room circa long-time-ago?

    LMAO, no! (thank goodness) :lol: They put locks on bathroom doors for a reason. Please, use them!

    G Wiv wrote:Pork roast, count me a Fan!

    That's one helluva nice-looking haunch, my friend. :)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1476 - November 9th, 2020, 7:53 pm
    Post #1476 - November 9th, 2020, 7:53 pm Post #1476 - November 9th, 2020, 7:53 pm
    Day 2 chili, even better than Day 1 and now with cornbread . . .

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    Cornbread & Lodge Cast Iron Skillet
    As you can see from the crispy edge, there was a bit of sharp cheddar in there. I also added some mild hatch chiles. It's a bit on the pale side because I used white cornmeal (from my friend's farm), rather than yellow. Good stuff. It was crispy on the outside and moist on the inside.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Chili with cheddar-chile skillet cornbread.

    Happy Monday! :)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1477 - November 11th, 2020, 8:25 pm
    Post #1477 - November 11th, 2020, 8:25 pm Post #1477 - November 11th, 2020, 8:25 pm
    I probably picked the wrong day to get overly ambitious trying to clean out the fridge, as work unexpectedly ended up being busier than usual. This resulted in an odd hybrid between a steamed meatloaf and a terrine . . .

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    Zucchini & Konosuke W2, Monosteel Nakiri, 165mm
    This gem of a knife (which I bought used) and I have already had some non-kitchen adventures together but this was the first time I really set out to use it on the board. The W2 easily sharpened up like a dream.

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    Mise En Place
    Caramelized onions & garlic, Palo Cortado sherry, salted and peppered ground beef, roasted zucchini slices, sauteed cauliflower, Cabot sharp cheddar, eggs, fresh herbs (thyme, parsley & chives).

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    Filling The Mold
    Had I known I was going to have to run off later, I probably would have just baked this as a meatloaf. But I set up for a longer-cooking, layered terrine. That ended up being a mistake because there was about an hour when it was just sitting on the counter, instead of in the oven. That resulted in some rushing at the end.

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    Ready For The Bain Marie
    Alternating layers of meat and veg, with a thin layer of cheddar just under the top layer of zucchini. Once filled, I pressed it all down, pulled the plastic wrap over and put it in a 275F bain marie. In hindsight, I should have just plopped it all in the pan and cooked it meatloaf style. It was done much later than I wanted and I didn't have time to let it set up as much as I would have preferred.

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    Beef & Veggie Loaf & Takeda Classic Sasanoha Large, 240mm
    If I own one knife that could slice through this fragile mess without destroying it, this would be it. Ultra-thin, long enough to make the cut in one, heel-first pass and second to none in the ways of food release.

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    Plated Up
    With some leftover vegetables from a recent carry-out meal.

    Even though I didn't get the result I originally envisioned, it was still a fun and tasty effort. But as I lost focus -- and time -- the dish suffered for it. I wish I'd had another 30-45 minutes to let it set up before slicing it but the family was clamoring and it was getting late.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1478 - November 11th, 2020, 8:40 pm
    Post #1478 - November 11th, 2020, 8:40 pm Post #1478 - November 11th, 2020, 8:40 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:With some leftover vegetables from a recent carry-out meal.

    Image
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1479 - November 11th, 2020, 9:18 pm
    Post #1479 - November 11th, 2020, 9:18 pm Post #1479 - November 11th, 2020, 9:18 pm
    G Wiv wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:With some leftover vegetables from a recent carry-out meal.

    Image

    Lol. Send your complaints directly to Sun Wah. :lol:

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1480 - November 12th, 2020, 1:35 am
    Post #1480 - November 12th, 2020, 1:35 am Post #1480 - November 12th, 2020, 1:35 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Lol. Send your complaints directly to Sun Wah. :lol:

    They, meaning Kelly & Laura, are well acquainted with my feelings on b*by co^n.

    Nachos for dinner. Nacho Nacho man!
    click to enlarge
    Image

    Nachos, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1481 - November 12th, 2020, 7:47 pm
    Post #1481 - November 12th, 2020, 7:47 pm Post #1481 - November 12th, 2020, 7:47 pm
    I made the zuni chicken tonight for the first time in a while. Sure is delicious, but man does it fat-cloak the oven!

    How are people prepping for shelter-in-place advisory?
  • Post #1482 - November 12th, 2020, 7:58 pm
    Post #1482 - November 12th, 2020, 7:58 pm Post #1482 - November 12th, 2020, 7:58 pm
    G Wiv wrote:Nachos, count me a Fan!

    Just remember, you don't own them. They're nacho nachos! :P

    annak wrote:How are people prepping for shelter-in-place advisory?

    More of the same . . . :|

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1483 - November 12th, 2020, 8:45 pm
    Post #1483 - November 12th, 2020, 8:45 pm Post #1483 - November 12th, 2020, 8:45 pm
    annak wrote:How are people prepping for shelter-in-place advisory?

    ronnie_suburban wrote:More of the same . . .

    Ronnie, where are you getting your chicken thighs? I plan on buying stock in the company.
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1484 - November 12th, 2020, 9:10 pm
    Post #1484 - November 12th, 2020, 9:10 pm Post #1484 - November 12th, 2020, 9:10 pm
    The continuing saga of dishwasher detergent use.

    The Kirkland dishwasher detergent finished on August 18th. I supposed I started the new container on August 19th and finished on November 1st or 74 days of use.

    It would appear I may finish this bottle on or about January 14th, 2021.

    During Covid lockdown, my dishwasher detergent use was much more finishing in 46 days.

    Or I may finish this bottle by December 17th, 2020.

    Let's see what really happens.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #1485 - November 12th, 2020, 9:54 pm
    Post #1485 - November 12th, 2020, 9:54 pm Post #1485 - November 12th, 2020, 9:54 pm
    G Wiv wrote:where are you getting your chicken thighs?

    We've been getting lots of chicken thighs from Gunthorp Farms via Homestead Meats in Evanston.
  • Post #1486 - November 14th, 2020, 5:16 pm
    Post #1486 - November 14th, 2020, 5:16 pm Post #1486 - November 14th, 2020, 5:16 pm
    G Wiv wrote:Ronnie, where are you getting your chicken thighs? I plan on buying stock in the company.

    nr706 wrote:We've been getting lots of chicken thighs from Gunthorp Farms via Homestead Meats in Evanston.

    Hahaha . . . any port in a storm. I prefer Amish and/or air-chilled, which they have at a few places around town. It's mainly been Whole Foods, Sunset and Harrison's.

    Now, changing gears completely . . . once a year I get a small stash of albacore tuna from our Sitka fish share and I never really know what to do with it. Today, for practice -- and with no better ideas -- I decided to just pretend it was ahi and see how it went . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place
    Coating (black and white sesame seeds, kosher salt, freshly ground white pepper), marinade (soy sauce, lime juice, olive oil, garlic), albacore tuna and dipping sauce (minced ginger, scallion & garlic, rice vinegar, honey, toasted sesame oil, dry hot mustard powder).

    I marinated the fish for about an hour in a ziptop bag (rotated halfway) before gently drying it off and rolling it in the sesame seed coating.

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    Searing
    Medium hot pan and a squirt of peanut oil.

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    Seared
    About 2 minutes on each of the three sides.

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    Slicing
    With the Konosuke Fujiyama Blue #2 Sujihiki, ebony, 270mm. A bit of overkill but I don't often get a chance to use this slicer.

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    Plated Up
    With some rice-cookered Tamanishiki short grain.

    This whole endeavor was sort of an in-between affair. I actually made it between meals, since I didn't want our dinner to hinge on an experiment. And clearly, while rare isn't right for albacore, neither is cooked through, so I took it to about 110F internal. While the interior wasn't dried out, the fish itself is relatively lean, so the sauce definitely helped. I'd use this prep again but I think I'd save it for a nice piece of ahi instead. In the meantime, if anyone has a tried and true recipe for albacore tuna, I hope they'll share it. I have couple more pieces in the freezer.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1487 - November 14th, 2020, 7:22 pm
    Post #1487 - November 14th, 2020, 7:22 pm Post #1487 - November 14th, 2020, 7:22 pm
    Not too bad outside. About 45F, light breeze and dry. So, a quick mixed grill tonight . . .

    Image
    Flatiron Steak + Weber Kettle
    Working through some Nature-Glo lump right now, which is actually pretty good. Bigger pieces than the Royal Oak flagship brand and no popping or sparking to speak of. Cooked this direct, flipping it and moving it frequently, until about halfway, then moved it to the indirect side, covered, until the end. Start to finish, about 10 minutes on the grill.

    Image
    A Closer Look
    Since the fire was so nice, I decide to throw an Italian sausage on at the end. Seemed a shame to only cook one item on such a great fire. Forgot to snap a pic of it, though.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With Mrs. Suburban's Not-Very-Famous roasted brussels sprouts, a bit of sushi rice (leftover in the rice cooker from this afternoon) and a few slices of the grilled sausage.

    All in all, a nice and easy one this evening.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1488 - November 15th, 2020, 7:36 pm
    Post #1488 - November 15th, 2020, 7:36 pm Post #1488 - November 15th, 2020, 7:36 pm
    Sunday, using up some leftovers and hitting the pantry . . .

    Brunch
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    Italian Sausage & Cheese "Frittata"
    More of an open omelet but still, a tasty dish. Was trying to finish off the leftover sausage from last night's dinner but there's still more of it.

    Dinner
    Had a stash of green curry paste in the freezer that was made and given to me by a friend. Decided to put it to use. Thought I had some Thai eggplant coming in a grocery delivery but it got 86'd, so I had to improvise . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Shibata Kashima R-2 Gyuto, 210mm
    Basil leaves, green beans, shiitakes, fish sauce, green curry paste, coconut milk, scallions (for garnish), extra firm tofu, chicken stock, U-26 shrimp, kaffir lime leaves & bruised lemongrass. Not pictured here are a couple of minced serranos (which I decided later, were needed) and . . .

    Image
    Fermented Shrimp Paste
    Even though I'd thought about it from the beginning, it wasn't until I was actually building the dish that I remembered to get this out of the fridge. Really glad I did. I used about 1/2 teaspoon and it changed the dish profoundly, adding some real funk to the whole affair.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With jasmine rice.

    Really glad I used the homemade curry paste, which was great. Now, I really want to make this again but now I'm faced with either making the curry paste myself (not super easy for me during coronatime) or finding a commercial brand that's worth buying.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1489 - November 16th, 2020, 4:02 pm
    Post #1489 - November 16th, 2020, 4:02 pm Post #1489 - November 16th, 2020, 4:02 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:In the meantime, if anyone has a tried and true recipe for albacore tuna, I hope they'll share it. I have couple more pieces in the freezer.


    In my familiar spirit of "not what you asked for necessarily but something like that" I have not tried this personally but albacore might be nice to confit. Samin Nosrat, probably a more reputable source than me, waxes poetic about it here https://www.tastecooking.com/tuna-confit-is-samin-nosrat-sleeper-hit/ and there's a recipe attached at the end. Anyway, not tried and true but it is what I would do if I were in your particular situation. Cheers:)
  • Post #1490 - November 16th, 2020, 4:20 pm
    Post #1490 - November 16th, 2020, 4:20 pm Post #1490 - November 16th, 2020, 4:20 pm
    Wow. I need to try that.
  • Post #1491 - November 16th, 2020, 4:20 pm
    Post #1491 - November 16th, 2020, 4:20 pm Post #1491 - November 16th, 2020, 4:20 pm
    em24666 wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:In the meantime, if anyone has a tried and true recipe for albacore tuna, I hope they'll share it. I have couple more pieces in the freezer.


    In my familiar spirit of "not what you asked for necessarily but something like that" I have not tried this personally but albacore might be nice to confit. Samin Nosrat, probably a more reputable source than me, waxes poetic about it here https://www.tastecooking.com/tuna-confit-is-samin-nosrat-sleeper-hit/ and there's a recipe attached at the end. Anyway, not tried and true but it is what I would do if I were in your particular situation. Cheers:)

    That's very cool. I was thinking maybe sous vide but I prefer the confit approach, which seems like it'll produce similar results texture-wise. Thanks!

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1492 - November 16th, 2020, 4:26 pm
    Post #1492 - November 16th, 2020, 4:26 pm Post #1492 - November 16th, 2020, 4:26 pm
    Hmm, I have some Keta salmon which does not have as much oil content as Sockeye, King or Coho. I might try to confit some of that.
    "I live on good soup, not on fine words." -Moliere
  • Post #1493 - November 16th, 2020, 4:46 pm
    Post #1493 - November 16th, 2020, 4:46 pm Post #1493 - November 16th, 2020, 4:46 pm
    em24666 wrote: In my familiar spirit of "not what you asked for necessarily but something like that" I have not tried this personally but albacore might be nice to confit. Samin Nosrat, probably a more reputable source than me, waxes poetic about it here https://www.tastecooking.com/tuna-confit-is-samin-nosrat-sleeper-hit/ and there's a recipe attached at the end. Anyway, not tried and true but it is what I would do if I were in your particular situation. Cheers:)

    Ooh. This does look good. I've got some tuna coming from Sitka this week. Thanks, em24666!
    -Mary
  • Post #1494 - November 16th, 2020, 7:39 pm
    Post #1494 - November 16th, 2020, 7:39 pm Post #1494 - November 16th, 2020, 7:39 pm
    Tapping a bit further into our most recent Sitka delivery, this one is super easy and has become one of our favorites. We really look forward to getting black cod, so we can make black cod misoyaki . . .

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    Mise En Place
    Four-ingredient marinade: mirin, sake, white miso and granulated sugar.

    Image
    Marinade
    Just mix them all up. Half-cup of miso, 3 T each of mirin and sake, 1 T sugar. I've messed around with several different misos but white seems to be the least sweet, which is why it's become part of my standard recipe. I also cut the sugar back quite bit from many recipes I've seen online. The other components contain plenty of sweetness.

    Image
    Marinating
    I've seen some recipes that call for as much as 6 hours or more in the bath but I've found, especially with thinner pieces of fish, 2-3 hours (flipped halfway through) is adequate.

    When it comes out of the bag, wipe the excess marinade off the fish and broil it (skin-side-down) for ~8-10 minutes, rotating at the half-way point. No flipping necessary.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With steamed broccoli and sauteed sesame-garlic spinach.

    Happy Monday! :)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1495 - November 16th, 2020, 7:48 pm
    Post #1495 - November 16th, 2020, 7:48 pm Post #1495 - November 16th, 2020, 7:48 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Image
    Marinating
    I've seen some recipes that call for as much as 6 hours or more in the bath but I've found, especially with thinner pieces of fish, 2-3 hours (flipped halfway through) is adequate.


    =R=


    We make the Nobu version of this dish pretty regularly; he actually calls for marinating for 36-48 hours; we find it wonderful.

    Tonight was an experiment in Bourbon Chicken at home (I was amused to see I posted in the Bourbon Chicken thread asking for recipes in 2012!). We shied away from the ketchup versions and settled on (after wok frying thighs that had been marinated in a little bourbon and shaoxing and tossed with cornstarch) a sauce that mixed actual bourbon, rice vinegar, soy, and brown sugar, plus lots of garlic, ginger, scallion. It came out quite tasty, though slightly too tangy/ gotta adjust proportion of vinegar. If anybody has pursued this food court classic since 2012, let me know!
  • Post #1496 - November 16th, 2020, 7:52 pm
    Post #1496 - November 16th, 2020, 7:52 pm Post #1496 - November 16th, 2020, 7:52 pm
    annak wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Image
    Marinating
    I've seen some recipes that call for as much as 6 hours or more in the bath but I've found, especially with thinner pieces of fish, 2-3 hours (flipped halfway through) is adequate.


    We make the Nobu version of this dish pretty regularly; he actually calls for marinating for 36-48 hours; we find it wonderful.

    Wow! That sounds more like a cure than a marinade but who am I question Nobu?! :D
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1497 - November 16th, 2020, 9:04 pm
    Post #1497 - November 16th, 2020, 9:04 pm Post #1497 - November 16th, 2020, 9:04 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    annak wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Image
    Marinating
    I've seen some recipes that call for as much as 6 hours or more in the bath but I've found, especially with thinner pieces of fish, 2-3 hours (flipped halfway through) is adequate.


    We make the Nobu version of this dish pretty regularly; he actually calls for marinating for 36-48 hours; we find it wonderful.

    Wow! That sounds more like a cure than a marinade but who am I question Nobu?! :D


    I did a version of this but added some sesame oil, Kikkoman Usukuchi soy sauce, SH Argyle spice mix & pickled thai chilies to the Mirin, miso and brown sugar. I planned to only marinate for 6-8 hours and make it for dinner last night, but I ended up leaving it in the marinade until tonight and it still didn’t really penetrate except for the skin. I think the oil content of the Black Cod keeps both the texture and flavor pretty much intact no matter what you do to it, including overcooking it. It was absolutely delicious, which is all that matters.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #1498 - November 17th, 2020, 6:13 pm
    Post #1498 - November 17th, 2020, 6:13 pm Post #1498 - November 17th, 2020, 6:13 pm
    Jambalaya is probably the first 'real' thing I learned how to cook . . . waaaay back in New Orleans in the early 1980's. It's certainly the first dish I can remember actually wanting to learn how to make. I purchased the Times Picayune Cookbook, which seemed like a definitive source at the time, and gave it a whirl. I'm pretty sure that the recipes in that book were sent in by readers. For better or for worse, the jambalaya recipe was so vaguely written, it's inherently subject to a large amount of interpretation.

    I've been making it for over three decades, so naturally, my version has evolved over that time, putting to use techniques that I learned making other dishes. Other changes were a-ha! moments that came from re-reading the recipe over and over again. Some just came to light as I continued to eat food from the region -- always the best kind of research! But overall, it's stayed pretty much the same over the years.

    Two of the primary components -- tasso ham and andouille sausage -- are indigenous to the region. Even though I've learned to make both over the years, there's nothing quite like the genuine article. So, I now order them from a smokehouse in Louisiana. These days, I only make this about once a year (if even), so it's absolutely worth having those two ingredients on hand before embarking on a jambalaya cook.

    I've never made a small pot of this, either. It's generally a party dish. I used to make it once a year for a large party my family hosted. After that tradition morphed, I made it a few times to take to various friends' parties. That kept me practiced enough at it, and also scratched the itch. However, once again seeking comfort during this extended stay at home, I decided it was time for jambalaya. And iirc, I hadn't made it since March of 2019. So yes, it was definitely time.

    Image
    Andouille Sausage & Tanaka Blue #2 Nashiji Gyuto, 210mm
    There's just nothing like andouille sausage. Yeah, I might have snarfed a few of those chunks while I was cutting it up. So what?! :P

    Image
    Tasso & Tanaka Blue #2 Nashiji Gyuto, 210mm
    This tasso is almost like a peppery pork jerky in flavor and texture. I've always interpreted the recipe I use to call for it being ground into small crumbles (the recipe is very vague), so this went into the food processor a bit later.

    Image
    Mise En Place
    Jambalaya waiting to happen: red bell & poblano peppers, onions, beef broth/stock, andouille sausage, black pepper, cubed pork shoulder, washed, converted rice*, celery, parsley, garlic, jalapeno peppers, cayenne pepper, dried thyme, bay leaf and ground tasso. Not pictured here -- and sometimes included -- is tomato paste. It really just depends on how it tastes after everything is in the pot.

    Here's the basic cooking order:
    Andouille - sear and remove
    Pork - season, sear in rendered andouille fat and remove
    Trinity (onions, peppers, celery) and Garlic - sweat in renderings
    Season To Taste (salt, black pepper, cayenne, thyme)
    Rice - stir to coat
    Tasso - stir to combine
    Broth/Stock - add to pot
    Andouille and Pork - return to pot
    Bay Leaves and some Parsley - add to pot
    Season To Taste (salt, black pepper, cayenne, thyme)
    Bring to boil, reduce to simmer, cover, cook 20-30 minutes, until rice is fully cooked.

    *Over the years, I've tried making this with all sorts of different rice. It may sound crazy but converted rice has proven to be the best choice both texturally and flavor-wise. I've made it with homemade stock a number of times. It's a nice upgrade but generally speaking, it doesn't move the needle quite enough to justify its inclusion every single time.

    Image
    Plated Up

    I used 5 cups of rice for this batch, which nearly filled a 12-quart stock pot, so I'll be distributing containers of it to some friends tomorrow.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1499 - November 17th, 2020, 7:27 pm
    Post #1499 - November 17th, 2020, 7:27 pm Post #1499 - November 17th, 2020, 7:27 pm
    Ronnie,

    Having sampled your jambalaya at the irisarbor Mardi Gras party ( evidently the last time you made it ), I know that your friends are in for a treat.

    I wonder if you have done the tasso in chunks before. To me, one of the joys of jambalaya is biting into different flavor chunks and textures.

    I am in total agreement on the converted rice. There is so much rice that the outside starch on unconverted is not wanted. One difference I might suggest is rather than cooking the rice on the stove top, put the pot in a 350 oven. I find that this large amount of rice cooks a little more evenly.
  • Post #1500 - November 17th, 2020, 7:46 pm
    Post #1500 - November 17th, 2020, 7:46 pm Post #1500 - November 17th, 2020, 7:46 pm
    lougord99 wrote:Ronnie,

    Having sampled your jambalaya at the irisarbor Mardi Gras party ( evidently the last time you made it ), I know that your friends are in for a treat.

    I wonder if you have done the tasso in chunks before. To me, one of the joys of jambalaya is biting into different flavor chunks and textures.

    I am in total agreement on the converted rice. There is so much rice that the outside starch on unconverted is not wanted. One difference I might suggest is rather than cooking the rice on the stove top, put the pot in a 350 oven. I find that this large amount of rice cooks a little more evenly.

    Thanks, Lou. I occasionally do include other proteins, like chicken or shrimp (and they provide some textural variation), but I've never tried dicing up any of the tasso. Ground as it is in a typical batch, there's some in every bite, which is key. But it might be cool to include the tasso two ways -- some of it ground and some of it diced.

    I had no trouble cooking the rice on the stove top but cooking it in the oven is intriguing because it does seem more foolproof. Is the necessary cook time about the same in the oven? I imagine the rice turns out a bit fluffier that way but maybe I'm not envisioning it right.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain

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