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Corona cuisine / Social distancing cooking
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  • Post #1531 - November 24th, 2020, 8:12 pm
    Post #1531 - November 24th, 2020, 8:12 pm Post #1531 - November 24th, 2020, 8:12 pm
    Rene G wrote:Maesri Green Curry Paste contains green chilies, garlic, wild ginger, shallots, lemon grass, salt, kaffir lime, sugar, galangal, and spices (coriander seeds, cumin, cardamom, and turmeric). Depending on what you have at hand, maybe also add pureed garlic and/or ginger or whatever seems to be lacking. When my Thai cooking needs some help (as is usually the case) I often find a little shrimp paste adds a lot. Same for fish sauce, but the two are significantly different.

    The GP wrote:I'll have to seek out the Maesri.

    Yes, you definitely should. This is a great tip, Peter. Thank you. The Maesri green curry paste is, by far, the best store-bought version I've tried. The flavors really popped and the heat was there, too. It'll become a pantry staple around here, for sure.

    Even though it'll just be the immediate family for Thanksgiving, I'm going through the ritual of making our traditional dinner (albeit, scaled down), so I've got a lot of prep and cooking ahead of me over the next couple of days. For that reason, I wanted something quick and easy tonight, so back, once again, to Thai green curry with shrimp . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Yu Kurosaki VG10 Fujin, 210mm
    Serranos, kaffir lime leaves, bamboo shoots, Maesri green curry paste, basil leaves, fish sauce, shrimp, coconut milk, chicken broth and palm sugar. Once again, I neglected to get the gapi out of the fridge until cooking was underway but at least I remembered it then. Also, not pictured here is some zucchini. A complete bastardization but I really wanted to incorporate more veg into the dinner.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With rice-cookered jasmine rice.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1532 - November 25th, 2020, 8:00 am
    Post #1532 - November 25th, 2020, 8:00 am Post #1532 - November 25th, 2020, 8:00 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    Rene G wrote:... Also, not pictured here is some zucchini. A complete bastardization but I really wanted to incorporate more veg into the dinner.

    =R=

    Zucchini sounds like a good choice especially if put in close to the end so it doesn't get too soft. Not as bitter as the Thai eggplant, not as horrifying as b*by c*rn.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #1533 - November 26th, 2020, 11:29 am
    Post #1533 - November 26th, 2020, 11:29 am Post #1533 - November 26th, 2020, 11:29 am
    JoelF wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:... Also, not pictured here is some zucchini. A complete bastardization but I really wanted to incorporate more veg into the dinner.

    Zucchini sounds like a good choice especially if put in close to the end so it doesn't get too soft. Not as bitter as the Thai eggplant, not as horrifying as b*by c*rn.

    Yeah, I added the zucchini near the end and it worked out really well. It still had some firmness but managed to absorb some of the curry, too. I'd do it again without hesitation.

    I don't quite feel the way she does but Helen Rosner has an insightful and provocative piece at The New Yorker this week . . .

    at newyorker.com, Helen Rosner wrote:In theory, I love to cook. I’ve been reminding myself of this lately, repeating it almost like a mantra, humming the percussive, iambic rhythm of the phrase while I clatter around in the cabinets in search of whatever skillet is inevitably at the very bottom of a teetering stack of pans, or ram the blade of a knife through the stalks of yet another head of celery, or fling a handful of salt resentfully at a wholly blameless chicken. In theory, I love to cook.

    To cook, as a home cook, isn’t just to cook—it’s to plan, to shop, to store, to prep, to combine, to heat, to serve. If I don’t love all those things, all the time, I can at least reliably expect a jolt of pleasure from one or two: the bland labor of chopping onion is paid for, more or less, by the rich smell of the stew as it simmers. But what I love most about cooking (in theory) is that it’s a puzzle to be solved. In its best form, cooking is a practice measured not in individual dishes but in days and even weeks—a strategic navigation of ingredients, expiration dates, uses and reuses, variety and sameness. I’m no good at chess, but in my mind the rush of realizing that the jumble of aging ingredients piled up in your fridge composes exactly what’s needed to make a beautiful dinner has to be, on some level, how Kasparov felt when he realized he was about to sock it to Topalov.

    In March, when it began to seem likely that the coronavirus pandemic would lead to a serious bunker-style hiding out, I felt the expected fear and anger but also, I admit, a certain thrill at the idea of a major shift in the rules of the kitchen game. How do you make it work when you don’t know how often you’ll be able to grocery shop? In early February, I had spoken, for a story, to a couple in Shunde, China, who had somehow been composing culinary sestinas in the midst of a strict lockdown, with minimal access to fresh ingredients; following their lead, in the weeks before New York City issued its own social-distancing mandates, I started growing my own herbs, bought jars in which to put up pickles, scoured cookbooks for recipes that used nothing but pantry ingredients and yet wouldn’t feel like military rations. We would be eating paella, I informed my husband, and cassoulet, and miso soup with homemade tofu, and fresh pasta, and Niçoise salads without the lettuce. We might be prisoners in our apartment, but at least we’d eat like kings . . .

    The Joylessness of Cooking

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1534 - November 26th, 2020, 11:46 am
    Post #1534 - November 26th, 2020, 11:46 am Post #1534 - November 26th, 2020, 11:46 am
    Foodwise, making something out of nothing is an art I've perfected over the yrs. For those leary, suggest getting a copy of the food bible. Great combinations limited only by imagination.
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #1535 - November 26th, 2020, 12:33 pm
    Post #1535 - November 26th, 2020, 12:33 pm Post #1535 - November 26th, 2020, 12:33 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    Rene G wrote:Maesri Green Curry Paste contains ...

    The GP wrote:I'll have to seek out the Maesri.

    Yes, you definitely should. This is a great tip, Peter. Thank you. The Maesri green curry paste is, by far, the best store-bought version I've tried. The flavors really popped and the heat was there, too. It'll become a pantry staple around here, for sure.



    I know the topic for this is "green" but if you've never tried Maesri's "red," please do.
    We cannot be friends if you do not know the difference between Mayo and Miracle Whip.
  • Post #1536 - November 26th, 2020, 1:03 pm
    Post #1536 - November 26th, 2020, 1:03 pm Post #1536 - November 26th, 2020, 1:03 pm
    seebee wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    Rene G wrote:Maesri Green Curry Paste contains ...

    The GP wrote:I'll have to seek out the Maesri.

    Yes, you definitely should. This is a great tip, Peter. Thank you. The Maesri green curry paste is, by far, the best store-bought version I've tried. The flavors really popped and the heat was there, too. It'll become a pantry staple around here, for sure.



    I know the topic for this is "green" but if you've never tried Maesri's "red," please do.

    Will do. I actually have a can on hand. What do you typically make with it?

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1537 - November 26th, 2020, 3:00 pm
    Post #1537 - November 26th, 2020, 3:00 pm Post #1537 - November 26th, 2020, 3:00 pm
    I usually just use it as a base paste for a red coconut milk curry.
    1/2 can for 1 regular sized can of coconut milk + a little doctoring up with fresh chili pepper, lime leaf and such. The other half of the curry paste can goes into the freezer, and I scoop off little chunks for stir fries, fried rice, or incorporating into marinades for chicken.

    I've settled on Maesri Red being my staple. I like it much more than their green.
    We cannot be friends if you do not know the difference between Mayo and Miracle Whip.
  • Post #1538 - November 26th, 2020, 3:27 pm
    Post #1538 - November 26th, 2020, 3:27 pm Post #1538 - November 26th, 2020, 3:27 pm
    1part Maesri, red or green. I typically use green. 2 parts yellow mustard. Use as wet rub for smoking. Grilling. Two stage hot smoke roast.

    I usually go 1/1. But I like heat more than most.
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1539 - November 29th, 2020, 12:26 am
    Post #1539 - November 29th, 2020, 12:26 am Post #1539 - November 29th, 2020, 12:26 am
    seebee wrote:I usually just use it as a base paste for a red coconut milk curry.
    1/2 can for 1 regular sized can of coconut milk + a little doctoring up with fresh chili pepper, lime leaf and such. The other half of the curry paste can goes into the freezer, and I scoop off little chunks for stir fries, fried rice, or incorporating into marinades for chicken.

    I've settled on Maesri Red being my staple. I like it much more than their green.

    Thanks. Duly noted. Will give it a whirl. Is there a store-bought green that you prefer?

    G Wiv wrote:1 part Maesri, red or green. I typically use green. 2 parts yellow mustard. Use as wet rub for smoking. Grilling. Two stage hot smoke roast.

    I usually go 1/1. But I like heat more than most.

    I like it. Do you think it would go well on chicken thighs? :lol:

    Not sure we needed any more poultry after Thanksgiving dinner and the ensuing leftovers but chicken is what we had in the freezer, so that's what I made for dinner on Saturday. The twist, if you can call it that, is that it was drumsticks, not thighs. :o :shock:

    Image
    Plated Up
    Charcoal-grilled drumsticks and sauteed broccolini with evoo, garlic and red chile flakes.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1540 - November 29th, 2020, 8:31 am
    Post #1540 - November 29th, 2020, 8:31 am Post #1540 - November 29th, 2020, 8:31 am
    seebee wrote:I usually just use it as a base paste for a red coconut milk curry.
    1/2 can for 1 regular sized can of coconut milk + a little doctoring up with fresh chili pepper, lime leaf and such. The other half of the curry paste can goes into the freezer, and I scoop off little chunks for stir fries, fried rice, or incorporating into marinades for chicken.

    I've settled on Maesri Red being my staple. I like it much more than their green.


    Maesri red curry paste is a staple around here, for an easy lunch I basically follow your lead. I do use the "bhunno" technique, wonderfully detailed by sazerac here. I skim a tablespoon or two of the seperated coconut cream out of the can and fry the paste for 5 minutes or so, then I add small cubed chicken thigh, coat, then add the rest of the coconut milk and maybe a splash of stock.

    The paste is fun to play with. I did a fridge-scrounge pad prik king type of dish with ground pork and green beans the other day, starting with frying the straight paste. Quite tasty. If I'm feeling ambitious I'll do a fried catfish pad prik king. I've been craving naem khao tod lately too and think I could tackle the red curry laced deep-fried rice if I could score some naem.
  • Post #1541 - November 29th, 2020, 12:10 pm
    Post #1541 - November 29th, 2020, 12:10 pm Post #1541 - November 29th, 2020, 12:10 pm
    Jefe wrote:
    seebee wrote:I usually just use it as a base paste for a red coconut milk curry.
    1/2 can for 1 regular sized can of coconut milk + a little doctoring up with fresh chili pepper, lime leaf and such. The other half of the curry paste can goes into the freezer, and I scoop off little chunks for stir fries, fried rice, or incorporating into marinades for chicken.

    I've settled on Maesri Red being my staple. I like it much more than their green.


    Maesri red curry paste is a staple around here, for an easy lunch I basically follow your lead. I do use the "bhunno" technique, wonderfully detailed by sazerac here. I skim a tablespoon or two of the seperated coconut cream out of the can and fry the paste for 5 minutes or so, then I add small cubed chicken thigh, coat, then add the rest of the coconut milk and maybe a splash of stock.

    The paste is fun to play with. I did a fridge-scrounge pad prik king type of dish with ground pork and green beans the other day, starting with frying the straight paste. Quite tasty. If I'm feeling ambitious I'll do a fried catfish pad prik king. I've been craving naem khao tod lately too and think I could tackle the red curry laced deep-fried rice if I could score some naem.


    I found a treasure trove of different kinds of naem, all delicious and slightly different, at Talard market on Broadway a couple of months ago. I know that’s likely out of your regular path these days, but just in case you’re in the hood.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #1542 - November 29th, 2020, 5:41 pm
    Post #1542 - November 29th, 2020, 5:41 pm Post #1542 - November 29th, 2020, 5:41 pm
    I've gone quesadilla quazy.

    Bacon & Egg, click to expand
    Image

    Quesadilla, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1543 - November 29th, 2020, 8:51 pm
    Post #1543 - November 29th, 2020, 8:51 pm Post #1543 - November 29th, 2020, 8:51 pm
    G Wiv wrote:I've gone quesadilla quazy.

    Hey, as long as you haven't gone quispy-quazy, we can still be friends! :lol:

    Thinking back to my attempt at Gaeng Hung Lay last week, I really wanted to find an effective and efficient way to mitigate the amount of fat in the final dish. Before I could even begin thinking about solutions, an answer dropped into my lap by way of a recently posted video at Souped Up Recipes' youtube channel for Braised Pork Belly with Vermicelli Noodles and Napa Cabbage. The "secret," as it turns out, is blanching. Duh. Why didn't I think of that?! I guess seeing the video gave me license to try a technique that was hiding in plain sight.

    In any case, the dish sounded great and with quite a bit of raw pork belly still left, I figured I'd give it a shot . . .

    Image
    Braising Mise & Konosuke Fujiyama FM Blue #2 Gyuto, 210mm
    The recipe calls for adding leek tops, roots and ginger to the water. Not only do they add flavor but supposedly, they also help "grab" some of the impurities that release from the belly during the blanching.

    Image
    Blanching Pot
    Starting with cold water and (not pictured) a splash of shaoxing wine.

    Image
    Rolling
    Covered pot and once it came to a boil, I removed the lid, let it bubble for another minute and then used a spider to remove everything from the pot. I also used a fine-mesh screen to remove all the gunk that had floated to the top, then poured what was left into a separator because I wanted to use that cooking water later as the base for the broth.

    Image
    Mise En Place & Konosuke Fujiyama FM Blue #2 Gyuto, 210mm
    Broad bean paste (subbed in for soy bean paste), garlic, star anise & Sichuan peppercorns, dried arbol chiles, soy sauce, granulated sugar, blanched pork belly, peanut oil, leafy napa cabbage, core napa cabbage and ginger & remaining sections of leek.

    Image
    Caramelizing The Sugar
    There is only a scant amount of sugar in the dish and it imparts virtually no sweetness. But adding it here and caramelizing it in the peanut oil, helps put some nice color on the belly.

    Image
    Building The Pot
    Caramelizing pork belly, adding the aromatics, incorporating the aromatics and adding the soy sauce and bean paste.

    Image
    Building The Soup
    Adding the strained and defatted braising liquid back, adding the core cabbage, adding the vermicelli noodles and adding the leafy cabbage. Since the core cabbage actually takes a few minutes to soften, it goes in first. The pre-soaked noodles and the leafy cabbage cook almost instantly.

    Image
    Plated Up

    I really liked this dish a lot. I was pleased with its richness, depth of flavor, heat and restrained amount of fat. Considering there were only five arbols and 1.5 teaspoons of Sichuan peppercorns in there, the heat and buzz were both very potent. I thought the blanching was a key step. There's no point in comparing a Thai curry to a Chinese-style soup but in my hands, this ended up being a more enjoyable use of pork belly than the Gaeng Hung Lay. That said, next time I make Gaeng Hung Lay, I'll definitely plan on blanching the belly first and see how it goes.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1544 - November 30th, 2020, 5:46 pm
    Post #1544 - November 30th, 2020, 5:46 pm Post #1544 - November 30th, 2020, 5:46 pm
    Jambon-Beurre, yep I'm fancy like that. Pickled beets, Ronnie's homemade Russian Dills and a few grapes.

    click to enlarge
    Image
    Image

    Jambon-Beurre, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1545 - November 30th, 2020, 6:32 pm
    Post #1545 - November 30th, 2020, 6:32 pm Post #1545 - November 30th, 2020, 6:32 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    seebee wrote:<seebee ramblings>...I've settled on Maesri Red being my staple. I like it much more than their green.

    Thanks. Duly noted. Will give it a whirl. Is there a store-bought green that you prefer?

    =R=


    No, there's not a green that I like, but I've prolly only tried Maesri and that one other brand that I always see next to Maesri that ISN'T "Thai Kitchen" brand.

    This got me thinkin'...I know I've seen Mexican markets that have a few piles of mole paste that you can buy and reconstitute with water or broth. Any of the little Thai-ish or Vietnamese-ish (multi-cultural Asian) markets around town have house made curry pastes? I would 119% want some. I've never really thought to check.

    Maesri green...it kind of has a musty-ish taste, just IMO. Their red is much cleaner and brighter on my tongue. I typically like red more in the Thai restaurants I go to, as well. I really like both, but gravitate to red. This is making me wanna go find a tin of their green, though. I haven't had it in years.

    This is also making me miss that little grocery store in the strip mall on the E side of Broadway just N of Lawrence. I haven't been there in AGES.
    We cannot be friends if you do not know the difference between Mayo and Miracle Whip.
  • Post #1546 - December 2nd, 2020, 5:36 am
    Post #1546 - December 2nd, 2020, 5:36 am Post #1546 - December 2nd, 2020, 5:36 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Took another swing at Chicken Parmesan tonight

    Inspired, as always, by Mr. R Suburban I had a go at Chicken Parmesan. Butterflied, pounded, brined chicken thighs, three part breading, provolone and mozzarella, broiler. Topped with sauce, served on pasta, tasty. Leftovers for Chicken Parmesan sandwiches.

    click on image to enlarge
    Image
    Image

    Chicken Parmesan, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1547 - December 2nd, 2020, 7:28 pm
    Post #1547 - December 2nd, 2020, 7:28 pm Post #1547 - December 2nd, 2020, 7:28 pm
    G Wiv wrote:Chicken Parmesan, count me a Fan!

    Very nice! Never thought to brine the thighs but I love the idea. Definitely going to try it next time, which I think may be soon.

    After a couple of nights of leftovers, it was back to the old routine . . . charcoal-grilled chicken thighs! :P I did mix it up a bit by using some pre-made rub from a friend's company. I normally shy away from pre-made rubs but this one was pretty good.

    Image
    Romanesco & Sukenari Aogami Super Kiritsuke, 210mm
    Old romanesco (but still in decent enough shape) and a new knife, my first kiritsuke. Not pictured here are a couple of tiny cauliflowers. I chopped and Mrs. Suburban roasted it all in her own inimitable fashion.


    Image
    Chicken Thighs Grilling
    Hit the end of a 20-pound bag of Nature-Glo and there was very little dust, even at the bottom. 21 minutes covered and indirect. Bird was juicy and fob. I do miss the days when no headlamp was needed for grilling dinner at 6 pm. :(

    Image
    Plated Up
    Charcoal-grilled chicken thighs with roasted romanesco/cauliflower medley and leftover Thanksgiving stuffing & gravy.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1548 - December 3rd, 2020, 8:44 pm
    Post #1548 - December 3rd, 2020, 8:44 pm Post #1548 - December 3rd, 2020, 8:44 pm
    A big "Yes!" and another thank you to everyone who posted about the Maesri red curry paste. It's a very nice product and was the foundation of a great dinner tonight, Thai-style red curry chicken . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Sukenari Aogami Super Kiritsuke, 210mm
    Palm sugar, Maesri red curry paste (barely visible), serranos & kaffir lime leaves, peanut oil, zucchini, fish sauce, bamboo shoots, coconut milk, chicken thigh meat and gelatinous chicken stock. Not pictured but definitely included later were fresh basil leaves. At least I didn't forget them! 8)

    Image
    Stir Fried Bok Choy
    Side dish with garlic, ginger and oyster sauce.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Thai-style red curry chicken with jasmine rice.

    This one's a real keeper. We just loved the intensity and depth of flavor.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1549 - December 4th, 2020, 9:09 am
    Post #1549 - December 4th, 2020, 9:09 am Post #1549 - December 4th, 2020, 9:09 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:A big "Yes!" and another thank you to everyone who posted about the Maesri red curry paste. It's a very nice product and was the foundation of a great dinner tonight, Thai-style red curry chicken . . .

    This one's a real keeper. We just loved the intensity and depth of flavor.

    =R=


    Very impressive as always, Ron!

    Here's this ol nugget from my kitchen, seems like not long ago, but..I am getting OLD!
    Red Curry Seebee Style
    We cannot be friends if you do not know the difference between Mayo and Miracle Whip.
  • Post #1550 - December 4th, 2020, 4:29 pm
    Post #1550 - December 4th, 2020, 4:29 pm Post #1550 - December 4th, 2020, 4:29 pm
    While we're talking coconut curries. I really enjoyed both cooking & eating this Indonesian-style chicken curry from always-reliable Andrea Nguyen. I cross referenced a classic James Oselund recipe as well, but I liked the more complex spice profile of Nguyen's. I had no candlenuts nor macadamias, so I skipped those. I'm fortunate that I've got a good stash of SE Asian aromatics in my freezer. I noticed poking around these and other Indonesian recipes a lack of fish sauce, despite all the other hallmark ingredients of the region.

    Anyway, its a fairly straightforward prep: grind spices, food process curry paste, fry paste, add meat, simmer in coconut milk. The house was perfumed for days, good stuff. And just a rich, deep curry, it really hit the spot. It's amazing how cooking something new can add enough novelty into the routine these days and cheer everybody up.

    I simmered some kale in the leftover sauce for lunch today and that was also delicious. I'm pretty much over kale these days, but it absorbed the curry wonderfully.
  • Post #1551 - December 5th, 2020, 12:48 am
    Post #1551 - December 5th, 2020, 12:48 am Post #1551 - December 5th, 2020, 12:48 am
    seebee wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:A big "Yes!" and another thank you to everyone who posted about the Maesri red curry paste. It's a very nice product and was the foundation of a great dinner tonight, Thai-style red curry chicken . . .

    This one's a real keeper. We just loved the intensity and depth of flavor.


    Very impressive as always, Ron!

    Here's this ol nugget from my kitchen, seems like not long ago, but..I am getting OLD!
    Red Curry Seebee Style

    Nice! I remember that thread. Hell, I'm old, too. I think I've aged 3 years in 2020 and it's not over yet!

    On Friday, all I cooked was as lowly omelet. Dinner was Week 3 of 4 of the One Off Supper Club series. So, with nothing more than a pick-up and reheat needed for that, the only thing left to cook was lunch . . .

    Image
    Ham, Cheddar, Scallion and Shallot Omelet
    With buttered and toasted, 'seedy square' bread from Bungalow By Middlebrow.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1552 - December 5th, 2020, 8:13 am
    Post #1552 - December 5th, 2020, 8:13 am Post #1552 - December 5th, 2020, 8:13 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Ham, Cheddar, Scallion and Shallot Omelet

    Nice!

    No pics for me, thought about taking one or seven but baked potato in a Chinese restaurant style bowl is not kitchen GQ. Though fugly appearance taste was tip-top.

    Big (huge) Russets, scrubbed then scraped with a knife blade to spotless. Poke a bunch of holes with the tip of a knife. Oil, kosher salt (abundant) bake at 400° until skin is crisp and interior fluffy, turning a few times.

    Danish bacon from Fresh Farms Niles in small crisp pieces, chives, sour cream, butter, cheddar shredded on a box grater, onions, minced Serrano (optional), slivered radish (optional).

    Place steaming hot potato in bowl, X cut, topping bar to doctor up the spud to your hearts content. I thought about adding other stuff like sauteed mushroom, Chinese sausage, ham or other types of cheese, one is only limited by their imagination, but called it a day with the above.

    We ate with the neighbors, was just going to be me and Ellen but Charlie the Dog came over for a visit and they were intrigued by the concept. (Of course I had enough for 4, its just as easy to bake 5 or 6 potatoes as two. Plus they are great the next day pan fried with eggs.

    They dug the simple potato transformed into meal. As did the me and the bride.

    Baked potato, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1553 - December 5th, 2020, 3:34 pm
    Post #1553 - December 5th, 2020, 3:34 pm Post #1553 - December 5th, 2020, 3:34 pm
    G Wiv wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Ham, Cheddar, Scallion and Shallot Omelet

    No pics for me, thought about taking one or seven but baked potato in a Chinese restaurant style bowl is not kitchen GQ. Though fugly appearance taste was tip-top.

    I'm sure it was. That sounds so good right now.

    I guess it's going to be a cleaning-out-the-fridge omelet weekend around here . . .

    Image
    Sauteed Mushrooms, Swiss, Shallot and Chive Omelet

    I'm pretty sure the mushrooms were extras that didn't find their way into our Thanksgiving dressing. I also peeled a bunch of shallots for that meal, some of which I didn't use, so I've been trying to work them in.

    I know that when it comes to omelets, mushroom & swiss is kind of a cliche but hey, it's endured for a reason! 8)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1554 - December 5th, 2020, 8:03 pm
    Post #1554 - December 5th, 2020, 8:03 pm Post #1554 - December 5th, 2020, 8:03 pm
    Got ahold of some dry-aged (30-45 day) NY Strips from Slagel Farms via Publican Quality Meats and decided to give it a go on the Weber. To accompany, we went with brussels sprouts, using a method I saw on Babish/youtube that I'd never tried before . . .

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    Brussels Sprouts
    Trimmed, oiled and seasoned with salt and pepper, these are supposed to go flat-side-down the baking sheet but our sprouts were so big, we had to quarter them, thus only one of the two flat sides is down. And, of course, there's shrapnel corner, too. :)

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    Bacon
    Lay strips of bacon over the sprouts. And into the oven at 425F for about 40 minutes. The method was good but not without its issues. After 40 minutes, the sprouts were done but the bacon was still flaccid. And the sprouts were swimming in an excessive pool of rendered bacon fat. I took them out and drained/blotted them, while returning the bacon to the oven for another few minutes, until it was crispy.

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    Dry-Aged, Bone-In NY Strips
    They smelled great, really mineraly and funky, just as I'd expect of dry-aged beef. I guess, from the description on PQM's website, these can be aged anywhere from 30-45 days.

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    Bacony Brussels Sprouts
    In the end, with some on-the-fly adjustments, these turned out pretty good. The sprouts were tender and tasty and with some extra time in the oven, the bacon did eventually get crispy.

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    Plated Up
    NY strip, brussels sprouts and leftover sauteed mushrooms. The steaks had nice flavor but surprisingly, were somewhat tough and sinewy. This isn't what I typically expect from dry-aged beef. These certainly had good flavor throughout the chew but the chew lasted way too long! :lol:

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1555 - December 6th, 2020, 7:26 pm
    Post #1555 - December 6th, 2020, 7:26 pm Post #1555 - December 6th, 2020, 7:26 pm
    Had a ~3-pound hunk of boneless leg of lamb in the freezer, leftover after my recent attempt at birria, so decided on a nice, easy Sunday braise . . .

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    Mise En Place & Sukenari Aogami Super Kiritsuke, 210mm
    Leafy celery, celery root, fresh thyme & sage, dried Greek oregano, salt, black pepper, whole garlic, yellow onion, white onion, red wine, evoo, lamb, crushed garlic and carrot. Not pictured (seems like I'm always leaving something out lately) are two bay leaves.

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    Chop, Chop, Chop
    Getting more familiar with the kiritsuke. Not surprisingly, it wedged a bit on the carrot but otherwise, it was an efficient run.

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    Braising Vessel
    After searing the meat and browning the onions + crushed garlic in evoo, I sweated the rest of the veg, and everything went back into the pot, along with the wine. This braised at 275F for ~3 hours. At that point, the meat was fork tender, so I removed it, and strained and separated the braising liquid. With the fat removed, I reduced the liquid, added back the strained veg (minus the bay leaves and herb stems) and pureed it all with a stick blender. That made for a thick and very flavorful sauce.

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    Plated Up
    Braised leg of lamb with leftover potatoes and carrots (from Friday night's carry-out) and Mrs. Suburban's somewhat legendary garlic-tomato green beans.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1556 - December 7th, 2020, 3:41 am
    Post #1556 - December 7th, 2020, 3:41 am Post #1556 - December 7th, 2020, 3:41 am
    Not sure what to call this, maybe pan fried rice cake with tuna and cheese. On a zero waste program, or as close as I can get, had leftover (from fried rice yesterday) white rice and chopped veg. Mixed in good tuna with oil, couple of eggs, s/p, chili flakes, splash of Valentina, drizzle of fish sauce, veg and aromatics with shredded cheddar. Too loose for individual patties so I pan fried in one big old cake. Did the platter flip routine.

    Turned out surprisingly well, canned tuna takes on a light sweetness when cooked, I often do a riff on an M Hazan recipe with tuna, red onion and crushed tomato. Even the bride liked it, then again it did not contain lizard fish. :)

    click to enlarge
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    Tuna cake, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1557 - December 7th, 2020, 9:49 am
    Post #1557 - December 7th, 2020, 9:49 am Post #1557 - December 7th, 2020, 9:49 am
    Gwiv,

    Does your wife now ask about all the ingredients in a dish before eating?

    Or is she on the lookout for the product with the lizardfish specifically?

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #1558 - December 7th, 2020, 4:09 pm
    Post #1558 - December 7th, 2020, 4:09 pm Post #1558 - December 7th, 2020, 4:09 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:Or is she on the lookout for the product with the lizardfish specifically?

    Up in 11 places around our house, mainly kitchen.

    click to enlarge
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    Lizardfish, MsWiv not a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1559 - December 7th, 2020, 7:31 pm
    Post #1559 - December 7th, 2020, 7:31 pm Post #1559 - December 7th, 2020, 7:31 pm
    Jefe wrote:I simmered some kale in the leftover sauce for lunch today and that was also delicious. I'm pretty much over kale these days, but it absorbed the curry wonderfully.

    This sounded really good and the notion stayed with me. And since we received a bunch of kale in our CSA box, I figured I'd give red curry another whirl, this time with kale and some other stuff . . .

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    Mise En Place & Shiro Kamo R2 Damascus Gyuto 210mm
    Tuscan kale, coconut milk, chicken broth, cremini mushrooms, basil leaves, gapi, Maesri red curry paste, bamboo shoots, fish sauce, serranos, palm sugar, kaffir lime leaves and firm tofu. I kind of forgot about this beautiful knife because I'd moved it to a block in my 'knife room' (formerly our dining room, since no one comes over anymore) for a touch-up but I remembered today just how much I enjoy using it.

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    Plated Up
    Red Curry Kale, Mushrooms & Tofu. A nice start to what looks like a busy week ahead.

    Happy Monday! :)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1560 - December 8th, 2020, 12:20 pm
    Post #1560 - December 8th, 2020, 12:20 pm Post #1560 - December 8th, 2020, 12:20 pm
    I went to the 99 Only store in Tucson recently. I purchased an 8 oz of yellowfin tuna packed by Phillip's Food from Baltimore.

    https://www.phillipsfoods.com/products/ ... wfin-tuna/

    The price was $2.99/ 8 oz container. This is a first rate product and is solid white tuna meat and is the best prepackages seafood product that I have seen.

    I have to see if they have any more.

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