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  • Post #1621 - December 21st, 2020, 4:06 pm
    Post #1621 - December 21st, 2020, 4:06 pm Post #1621 - December 21st, 2020, 4:06 pm
    lougord99 wrote:Am I allowed to copy a BA recipe to LTH Forum ?

    You could probably get away with it but we really frown on that. Best to copy and paste a portion under 150 words and provide a link to the actual recipe.

    =R=
    for the Moderators
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1622 - December 21st, 2020, 4:15 pm
    Post #1622 - December 21st, 2020, 4:15 pm Post #1622 - December 21st, 2020, 4:15 pm
    lougord99 wrote:
    boudreaulicious wrote:Pretty sure that Epicurious is a recipe aggregator site—Bon Appetit and Food & Wine being their main sources, but they do have others. I don’t think they’re a “magazine” though they may have some original content on the site.

    I'm not clear how they publish recipes from a site such as Bon Appetite without approbation. Bon Appetite would claim some kind of copyright ( I don't know these terms and don't understand how the concept works in practice ). Am I allowed to copy a BA recipe to LTH Forum ?

    Epicurious is owned by Conde Nast. They list Gourmet, Bon Appetit, Self, and others as their partners. More info here.
    -Mary
  • Post #1623 - December 21st, 2020, 4:19 pm
    Post #1623 - December 21st, 2020, 4:19 pm Post #1623 - December 21st, 2020, 4:19 pm
    lougord99 wrote:
    boudreaulicious wrote:Pretty sure that Epicurious is a recipe aggregator site—Bon Appetit and Food & Wine being their main sources, but they do have others. I don’t think they’re a “magazine” though they may have some original content on the site.

    I'm not clear how they publish recipes from a site such as Bon Appetite without approbation. Bon Appetite would claim some kind of copyright ( I don't know these terms and don't understand how the concept works in practice ). Am I allowed to copy a BA recipe to LTH Forum ?


    My mistake on this--I am 99% sure that some years ago (I used to use Epicurious all the time but stopped when I started my own Dropbox filing system of recipes), Epicurious used to be almost exclusively an aggregator of other mags' recipes--with full attribution on each recipe on the site. It mostly published recipes from the big food mags but there were also republished recipes from some books, Food network chefs and other content. No idea when this changed because, like I said, I pretty much stopped using the site years ago. Just went on now and see that it was folded into Bon Appetit by mutual owner, Conde Nast about 5 years ago, but the focus is primarily original content. So disregard my prior post :)
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #1624 - December 21st, 2020, 7:30 pm
    Post #1624 - December 21st, 2020, 7:30 pm Post #1624 - December 21st, 2020, 7:30 pm
    Lizard Fish !
    ImageLizard fish, chicken, mushrooms and snow peas.

    I love Lizard Fish
  • Post #1625 - December 21st, 2020, 8:56 pm
    Post #1625 - December 21st, 2020, 8:56 pm Post #1625 - December 21st, 2020, 8:56 pm
    First-ever attempt at oxtails. Did some digging on the internet and got somewhat overloaded with information, which made it hard to pick a path. I got caught somewhere between Jamaican-style and Cuban-style, so there are elements of both here. In the end, they were very tasty and plenty tender, and the braising liquid was richly flavored . . . but if I'd had more time, would have let it all reduce down a bit further . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Kohetsu HAP40 Western Gyuto, 210mm
    Part of it was my own, damned, indecisive fault but there were a lot of ingredients here: minced garlic, scallion tops & fresh thyme, Rotel mild, scallion bottoms, onion, carrot, soy sauce, evoo, Maggi, oxtails, butter beans, red bell peppers/poblanos/whole habanero, allspice berries, dried rosemary, granulated onion, granulated garlic, black pepper, granulated ginger, bay leaves, freshly-ground allspice, dried thyme, salt and minced habanero.

    Third day in a row with this knife and I do love it but it's time to move on. :D

    Image
    Spice Mix
    Freshly-ground allspice, dried thyme, granulated garlic, granulated onion, dried rosemary, granulated ginger, black pepper, salt and the finished spice mix in the pyrex.

    Image
    Marinade
    Oxtails and the components for the marinade.

    Image
    Marinating
    Here, after getting splashes of the soy sauce and Maggi, the oxtails are then tossed with the spice blend and whole allspice berries. I let this sit for about an hour before moving ahead but some recipes I read called for 6-8 hours. :shock:

    Image
    Sear
    Searing off the the oxtails, pre-braise, in some evoo.

    Image
    Adding The Veg
    After temporarily removing the oxtails, in order to lift the fond and start the braise, I added about 2/3 of the veg here, along with the bay leaves and fresh thyme.

    Image
    Building The Braise
    Next, I added the Rotel did my best to submerge all the veg. I realized that I was a bit premature on adding the fresh thyme, so I temporarily removed it.

    Image
    Braise
    Seared oxtails back in, along with the fresh thyme and one whole, slitted habanero. From here, I added water to barely cover the oxtails, put the lid on and simmered it for ~3 hours (and yes, I could/should have used less water).

    Image
    Veg Reinforcements
    With what I estimated to be about 15 minutes to go, I added the remaining 1/3 of the vegetables that I'd held back at the beginning.

    Image
    Adding The Canned Beans
    I make a pot of homemade beans nearly every week but not this week, so I had to go with canned, which were recommended (as a thickener) in a few of the Jamaican recipes I read.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Over rice. There was a salad that was almost identical to the one I posted last night, so no pic of it. :wink:

    Happy Monday! :)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1626 - December 23rd, 2020, 8:59 pm
    Post #1626 - December 23rd, 2020, 8:59 pm Post #1626 - December 23rd, 2020, 8:59 pm
    Took another shot at chile verde pork stew tonight but before that, there was prep for a couple of side dishes . . .

    Image
    Black Bean Mise En Place
    By coincidence (or maybe it was unconscious) I made my ~weekly pot of beans today. This time around, Black Turtle Beans from Three Sisters Garden. I'm ambivalent about soaking. Today I had time, so I did. The rest of the set-up is a whole habanero, two serranos and two jalapenos. I leave them all whole but slit them before I throw them in the pot. Salt, pepper, bay leaf, onion (later diced and sweated) and garlic (later crushed and sweated). I almost always add salt to beans from the outset because I've never found it to hinder cooking; 2 teaspoons of kosher salt for 1 pounds of beans.

    Image
    Rice Mise En Place
    Sauteed carrot-onion-garlic, tomato paste, chicken-tomato bouillon, black pepper, salt, 2 cups washed long grain rice and a hunk of frozen peas. This all went into the rice cooker with just a bit over 2 cups of water (peas actually go in after the rice is cooked, to maintain their texture). Just a little salt, as the bouillon is plenty salty.

    Now, the chile verde . . .

    Image
    Poblanos
    Ready for roasting.

    Image
    Poblanos
    After roasting in the oven, they went from here immediately to a sealed zipper bag to help steam up. This made the skinning much easier.

    Image
    Veggies, Pan-Roasting
    Tomatillos, onion, whole garlic cloves, serranos and jalapenos all in the 13.25" Lodge cast iron skillet. Once the first tomatillo bursts, it's time to remove everything from the pan.

    Image
    Mise En Place
    Roasted, skinned and seeded poblanos, Mexican oregano, roasted hatch chiles, homemade chicken stock (ended up not using it), cumin, roasted veggies, Vitamix vessel and cilantro. This all (minus 4/8 of the poblanos) went into the Vitamix to create the green chile cooking medium. The remaining 4 poblanos get chopped coarsely and added to the stew a few minutes before it finishes cooking.

    Image
    Vitamix
    All blended, nice and smooth.

    Image
    Pork Shoulder
    Seasoned with salt, pepper, cumin and Mexican oregano and then seared in a touch of vegetable oil.

    Image
    Simmering
    Once the pork browns, the chile verde cooking medium goes in and the whole deal simmers, covered, until the pork is tender.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Chile verde pork stew, black beans and Mexican restaurant-style rice.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1627 - December 24th, 2020, 10:40 am
    Post #1627 - December 24th, 2020, 10:40 am Post #1627 - December 24th, 2020, 10:40 am
    annak wrote:made another Maiale al Latte tonight. Duroc pork shoulder from Bucktown Fresh Market on Western; seasoned with salt for an hour; then seared on all sides (a long process); then braised with 6 cups of milk, 2 cinnamon sticks, lots of lemon zest, for 3 hours in a 300 oven. The milk solids caramelize and the result is fork tender, delicate aromatic flavor. We served with simple buttered pasta (and the milk gravy) and haricots vert and it was very pleasing.


    I both vouch for the Bon Appetit recipe and the meat counter at Fresh Market on Western. Today I'm making some focaccia with the recipe from the dearly departed Saltie restaurant. Food52 has published it on their website here https://food52.com/recipes/28786-saltie-s-focaccia, mine has never turned out as well as the restaurant but I appreciate the simplicity, gets my wheels turning about restaurant labor economy as I sit at home. The cookbook is wonderful if anyone is looking to add something to their collection. And a nice reminder that you never know what little thing will change your outlook on life (or, less poetically, food). I'll be making smoked chicken sandwiches today but it would be very good with maiale al latte leftovers.

    As a semi-separate thought, for Thanksgiving I bought chuck roast from the meat counter at Fresh Market, 3 pounds of Slagel beef for $28. My parents think this is too expensive but we got 6 meals out of it and it was a holiday so I choose to disagree. I used the somewhat extravagant Tamar Adler "Boeuf a la Mode" recipe from the New York Times (whole bottle of red wine, dry porcini mushrooms, pig's foot, brandy...). It was so beautiful and fun to make, I can't wait to repeat for company when we can. I'll link to the recipe but you have to have an account to view it https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1017929-boeuf-a-la-mode.
  • Post #1628 - December 25th, 2020, 12:43 pm
    Post #1628 - December 25th, 2020, 12:43 pm Post #1628 - December 25th, 2020, 12:43 pm
    Lamb Biriyani.

    I made this from 'Classic Indian Cooking' by Julie Sahni. This was literally an all day affair. First thing in the morning I made chicken stock and Usli Ghee.

    For the chicken stock i used the pressure cooker and put in chicken backs that I had bought frozen at Sunset and some aromatics. I cooked at high pressure for 45 minutes and allowed it to naturally depressurize.

    Usli Ghee seems to be different from normal ghee in that you cook it a little longer and brown the milk solids, which gives the ghee a nutty flavor.
    Image I created lamb cubes from a 1/2 leg of lamb. I had about 1.5 pounds of meat when I was done.
    ImageThen I assembled the ingredients to cook the lamb: The lamb chunks, thin sliced onions, fine chopped garlic and ginger, full fat yogurt and sour cream. The spice mix contained ground cumin, ground blade mace, cayenne, paprika, cinnamon, ground green cardamon seeds and pepper.
    Image I browned the onions in the ghee. Added the ginger and garlic for 30 seconds and then added the spice mix and then the lamb pieces. I browned the lamb all over and then added the yogurt and sour cream.
    Image I simmered this mixure for 2 hours.

    I cooked the basmati as she instructed with a rinse and then a soak and then a slow cook. The liquid was the chicken stock i had made earlier.

    In preparation for putting the casserole together, I browned slivered almond, cashews and raisins in some ghee. I browned some more onions in ghee. I mixed chopped fresh mint, serrano and milk in a small bowl. In another bowl I crushed some saffron and added a little scalded milk.

    Put some ghee in the bottom of the baking dish and layer in 1/4 of the rice. Sprinkle 1/2 of the mint mixture. layer in 1/2 of the lamb. add another 1/4 of rice. Sprinkle remaining mint mixtue, cover with the rest of the lamb and cover everything with the remaining rice. Smooth the top of the rice and drizzle the saffron mixture all over the top. Also drizzle some ghee over the top. Bake for 40 minutes. Serve on plates and top with the browned almonds, cashews, raisins and onions.
    Image
  • Post #1629 - December 25th, 2020, 2:16 pm
    Post #1629 - December 25th, 2020, 2:16 pm Post #1629 - December 25th, 2020, 2:16 pm
    lougord99 wrote:Lamb Biriyani.

    Awesome, Lou! That really looks great! :)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1630 - December 25th, 2020, 2:33 pm
    Post #1630 - December 25th, 2020, 2:33 pm Post #1630 - December 25th, 2020, 2:33 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Awesome, Lou! That really looks great! :)

    Agree, really nice!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1631 - December 25th, 2020, 7:40 pm
    Post #1631 - December 25th, 2020, 7:40 pm Post #1631 - December 25th, 2020, 7:40 pm
    Even though I'm not a huge fan of the cut, because it's a real crowd pleaser, I make beef tenderloin once a year; on Christmas. So, despite the fact that our house was going to be relatively empty this year, tradition won out. I special-ordered a whole, prime tenderloin from Zier's . . .

    Image
    Beef Tenderloin
    Lightly oiled and seasoned. Trussing done by the fine folks at Zier's. They also vacuum-sealed it, so I could pick it up early in the week without worry.

    Image
    Bouillon
    Since my method (and this cut in general) produce virtually no pan juices, I had to use some frozen stock to make a gravy (all I had was chicken). To amp it up, I added some carrot, celery root, shallot, garlic, dried porcinis and fresh thyme, and let it all infuse at very low heat for about 20 minutes. From there, I strained it and after separately making a roux (adding minced shallots), made a sauce with the strained, infused stock.

    Image
    Finished Tenderloin
    Cooking at 200F, it took about 2.5 hours for it to reach 120F internal. After that, I blasted it at 475F convection for about ~6 minutes (turning it after 3) to crust it up. I really like this method, especially with relatively lean tenderloin, because it leaves the meat equally done from edge to edge, with no bullseye effect.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With sauteed broccoli rabe, garlic & red wine braised shiitake/cremini combo and shallot & frozen stock sauce.

    Merry Christmas! :)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1632 - December 27th, 2020, 3:34 pm
    Post #1632 - December 27th, 2020, 3:34 pm Post #1632 - December 27th, 2020, 3:34 pm
    Time for our regular batch of coleslaw, which I haven't typically documented . . .

    Image
    Green Cabbage & Kohetsu HAP40 Gyuto, 210mm
    Getting ready for coleslaw. I like to salt the cabbage before "slawing" it, to help draw out excess moisture and soften the cabbage just a bit. After some experimentation, the magic number seems to be 1.5% salt, by weight. I let it sit for a few hours, occasionally squeezing down the cabbage and pouring off the liquid that forms. This was 930g of cabbage, so I added about 14g of kosher salt.

    Image
    Dressing Mise En Place
    Celery seed, mayo #1*, yellow mustard, black pepper, mayo #2, tupelo honey, apple cider vinegars and grated sweet onion. Obviously, there's no need for any additional salt, since the cabbage has already been sprinkled with it. As for mayo #1*, I use just a bit. I inadvertently ended up with this jar at the beginning of the pandemic and I don't really like it as mayo but it works nicely as a 'condiment' in coleslaw. It's kind of like a fussy version of Miracle Whip. After making dozens of batches of slaw over the past 8+ months, it's finally just about gone. :D There are no set proportions here, just mix a bunch of these items together until it tastes decent, then refrigerate it until the cabbage is done draining.

    Image
    Ready To Mix
    Salted, drained cabbage & shaved carrot, dressing.

    Image
    Plated Up
    A batch this size will last us anywhere from 7-14 days, depending on who's in the mood for it and how often. It's definitely become a staple for us over the past 8+ months.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1633 - December 27th, 2020, 7:21 pm
    Post #1633 - December 27th, 2020, 7:21 pm Post #1633 - December 27th, 2020, 7:21 pm
    Thai-style red curry with chicken and an experimental ingredient* . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Gihei Blue #2 Gyuto, 210mm
    Thai bird chiles & kaffir lime leaves, boneless, skinless chicken thighs, coconut milk, bamboo shoots, Maesri red curry paste, homemade chicken stock, fish sauce, basil leaves, tofu noodles*, zucchini and palm sugar. Inaugural run with the Gihei, which was a Christmas gift from my wife and son. :) So far, I like it. Needless to say, it handled boneless chicken, zucchini and Thai chiles exceedingly well! :D

    Image
    Plated Up
    I dusted my serving with some dried Thai chile. All in all, a very tasty combination . . . however, I'm not crazy about that particular brand of bamboo shoots and hope to avoid using it in the future (I think it's from Whole Foods). The tofu noodles didn't add much. I actually liked that they, predictably, remained pretty chewy. But because they're not very porous, they absorbed virtually none of the curry. Next time, back to firm or extra firm tofu.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1634 - December 27th, 2020, 9:03 pm
    Post #1634 - December 27th, 2020, 9:03 pm Post #1634 - December 27th, 2020, 9:03 pm
    I think a lot of us had red curry on the brain because of these posts. Made a variation on a long-saved Bon Appetit red curry cod recipe last week.
    (https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/cod-poached-in-tomato-curry

    Image

    Image

    My version used Sitka Salmon Shares Lingcod and Halibut poached in red curry (Maesri red curry base—my go-to—with ginger, garlic, shallot, green onion, cilantro, kale, lime juice, coconut milk, turmeric and coriander—omitted the tomatoes and the cardamon), served with a side of broccolini and kale sautéed with olive oil, garlic and lemon. Delicious!
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #1635 - December 27th, 2020, 9:12 pm
    Post #1635 - December 27th, 2020, 9:12 pm Post #1635 - December 27th, 2020, 9:12 pm
    And as long as I’m here, I’ll add tonight’s Sunday supper—something I’ve always wanted to make and finally did—my childhood fave, Chicken (and Turkey) pot pie.

    Image

    Image

    Only way to do it is with a full crust and a “solid but not dry” filling. Did mine with celery, carrots, green onion, pink onion (last from my garden), leek tops and garlic cloves (no pearl onions or peas, which, I think, kept out extra liquid as well). Subbed 2% milk for heavy cream (didn’t have it) and left out the Sherry. Used a leftover Immaculate pie crust for the bottom and sides and leftover DuFours puff pastry for the top. I have enough extra filling to make at least a few more. Soooo good!!!
    https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/patrick-and-gina-neely/individual-chicken-pot-pies-recipe-1947745
    Last edited by boudreaulicious on December 28th, 2020, 9:31 am, edited 1 time in total.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #1636 - December 27th, 2020, 10:17 pm
    Post #1636 - December 27th, 2020, 10:17 pm Post #1636 - December 27th, 2020, 10:17 pm
    Hi,

    For most pies, I will put the pie on the bottom rack with cookie sheet or pizza stone or steel underneath preheated with the oven. Never had a soggy bottom yet and hope never to have one ever.

    Pot pie does sound delicious!

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #1637 - December 27th, 2020, 11:16 pm
    Post #1637 - December 27th, 2020, 11:16 pm Post #1637 - December 27th, 2020, 11:16 pm
    Few days of indulgence called for ~less~ indulgence. Simple yet incredibly delicious technique from the God of Cooking himself, Jacques Pepin.

    Watch the video, follow the clear instructions, eat, enjoy, repeat.
    Honey Roasted Sweet Potatoes

    click to expand
    Image

    Jacques Pepin, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1638 - December 28th, 2020, 7:56 pm
    Post #1638 - December 28th, 2020, 7:56 pm Post #1638 - December 28th, 2020, 7:56 pm
    boudreaulicious wrote: . . . something I’ve always wanted to make and finally did—my childhood fave, Chicken (and Turkey) pot pie. . .

    Man, do those pies look and sound delicious! I take it the DuFours is decent stuff? I've seen it but never tried it.

    G Wiv wrote:Jacques Pepin, count me a Fan!

    Wow! As much as I truly detest sweet potatoes, watching that video -- coupled with your gorgeous pic -- nearly had me making this dish. JP truly is the master!

    With a few aging eggplants in stock, I scoured the internet to come up with a viable way to use them. I combined elements from a few sources and came up with a variation on Yu Xiang Eggplant . . .

    Image
    Eggplant & Gihei Blue #2 Gyuto, 210mm
    I hated to do it but I peeled these eggplant before the Gihei took them down. I would have preferred to leave the skin on. They were still firm but the outsides were pretty marred and I didn't think including the skins would be a good idea. I added 1% salt to help coax the excess moisture and bitterness out of the eggplant. After about an hour, quite a bit of liquid seeped out. Then, rather than fry the eggplant, I steamed it before including it in the final build.

    Image
    Mise En Place & Gihei Blue #2 Gyuto, 210mm
    Red bell pepper, scallion bottoms, minced garlic, minced ginger, scallion tops, corn starch, dark soy sauce, Shaoxing wine, chinkiang vinegar, soy sauce, steamed eggplant, fermented broad bean paste and carrot.

    This starts with a quick frying of the garlic, ginger, scallion bottoms and bean paste in a splash of peanut oil. Once it becomes fragrant, the eggplant, peppers and carrots go in. Once the peppers and carrots soften just a bit, the sauce (soy, dark soy, wine, vinegar, corn starch) is added. Once that thickens, the dish is removed from the heat, plated up and garnished.

    Image
    Yu Xiang-style Eggplant
    Garnished with scallion tops and sesame seeds. All in all, it came out pretty good, very tasty. Again, I think having the eggplant skin intact would have improved things texturally. It was soft but it wasn't mushy. Still, it felt like it was missing just a little bite, even though the carrot and pepper did provide some nice textural contrast.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With broiled, misoyaki black cod and steamed jasmine rice.

    Happy Monday! :)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1639 - December 28th, 2020, 7:56 pm
    Post #1639 - December 28th, 2020, 7:56 pm Post #1639 - December 28th, 2020, 7:56 pm
    boudreaulicious wrote: . . . something I’ve always wanted to make and finally did—my childhood fave, Chicken (and Turkey) pot pie. . .

    Man, do those pies look and sound delicious! I take it the DuFours is decent stuff? I've seen it but never tried it.

    G Wiv wrote:Jacques Pepin, count me a Fan!

    Wow! As much as I truly detest sweet potatoes, watching that video -- coupled with your gorgeous pic -- nearly had me making this dish. JP truly is the master!

    With a few aging eggplants in stock, I scoured the internet to come up with a viable way to use them. I combined elements from a few sources and came up with a variation on Yu Xiang Eggplant . . .

    Image
    Eggplant & Gihei Blue #2 Gyuto, 210mm
    I hated to do it but I peeled these eggplant before the Gihei took them down. I would have preferred to leave the skin on. They were still firm but the outsides were pretty marred and I didn't think including the skins would be a good idea. I added 1% salt to help coax the excess moisture and bitterness out of the eggplant. After about an hour, quite a bit of liquid seeped out. Then, rather than fry the eggplant, I steamed it before including it in the final build.

    Image
    Mise En Place & Gihei Blue #2 Gyuto, 210mm
    Red bell pepper, scallion bottoms, minced garlic, minced ginger, scallion tops, corn starch, dark soy sauce, Shaoxing wine, chinkiang vinegar, soy sauce, steamed eggplant, fermented broad bean paste and carrot.

    This starts with a quick frying of the garlic, ginger, scallion bottoms and bean paste in a splash of peanut oil. Once it becomes fragrant, the eggplant, peppers and carrots go in. Once the peppers and carrots soften just a bit, the sauce (soy, dark soy, wine, vinegar, corn starch) is added. Once that thickens, the dish is removed from the heat, plated up and garnished.

    Image
    Yu Xiang-style Eggplant
    Garnished with scallion tops and sesame seeds. All in all, it came out pretty good, very tasty. Again, I think having the eggplant skin intact would have improved things texturally. It was soft but it wasn't mushy. Still, it felt like it was missing just a little bite, even though the carrot and pepper did provide some nice textural contrast.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With broiled, misoyaki black cod and steamed jasmine rice.

    Happy Monday! :)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1640 - December 28th, 2020, 8:32 pm
    Post #1640 - December 28th, 2020, 8:32 pm Post #1640 - December 28th, 2020, 8:32 pm
    DuFours is a great product. Pricey, but worth it. Recipes for puff pastry don’t look difficult but it’s one of those things I’ve never taken the time to make. Next round, I promised myself I would.

    In this case, I had a sheet of both the DuFour and the immaculate pie crust (another very reliable product) leftover from an appetizer project the previous week, so this was a perfect way to use them up.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #1641 - December 29th, 2020, 6:40 pm
    Post #1641 - December 29th, 2020, 6:40 pm Post #1641 - December 29th, 2020, 6:40 pm
    I had an open can of maesri green curry paste, some recently acquired tiny eggplant and basil, a chunk of prime brisket from the bottom of the freezer, a serrano from the fridge, a third of a bell pepper julienned, half a can of straw mushrooms, the usual fish sauce and smidge of brown sugar.
    In the last five minutes, I stirred in a fistful of rice noodles that had been soaking in hot water.

    Made a fine dinner. The brisket would have benefited from a longer, slower simmer, but still good as is.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #1642 - December 29th, 2020, 7:22 pm
    Post #1642 - December 29th, 2020, 7:22 pm Post #1642 - December 29th, 2020, 7:22 pm
    JoelF wrote:I had an open can of maesri green curry paste, some recently acquired tiny eggplant and basil, a chunk of prime brisket from the bottom of the freezer, a serrano from the fridge, a third of a bell pepper julienned, half a can of straw mushrooms, the usual fish sauce and smidge of brown sugar.
    In the last five minutes, I stirred in a fistful of rice noodles that had been soaking in hot water.

    Made a fine dinner. The brisket would have benefited from a longer, slower simmer, but still good as is.

    Sounds really good. I love resourceful inventory depletion (getting RID of stuff), especially when it works out favorably. That was the situation over here tonight although, after making a big pot of soup, there will now be leftover leftovers . . . :roll:

    Image
    Mise En Place & Gihei Blue #2 Gyuto, 210mm
    Quartered creminis, crushed garlic, kale, carrot/scallion/leafy celery/onion, evoo, heavily concentrated homemade chicken stock, salt, black pepper and pork shoulder. Man, did it feel good moving all this inventory. That was approximately a pint of Instant Pot stock that had once been oven a gallon. I cooked it way down, so it would be easier to store. Today, with a couple quarts of water added, it was more than enough to make a very tasty soup.

    I'm still plugging away with the new Gihei, which was a Christmas gift from Mrs. Suburban. It was probably a bit too broad at its spine to be the best choice for the cubing the pork but it wasn't exactly a problem, either. It easily glided through the coarse chopping on the rest of the ingredients.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Pork Shoulder, Kale & Mushroom Soup, with a toasted, buttery slab of delicious bread baked by a friend.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1643 - December 30th, 2020, 4:23 pm
    Post #1643 - December 30th, 2020, 4:23 pm Post #1643 - December 30th, 2020, 4:23 pm
    Did a standing rib roast for Christmas. Saved the ribs, and a bunch of odd scraps, plus a few decent slices. So, today, simmered the ribs, the scraps, ginger slices, a few cloves, cinnamon sticks, and star anise in a boxed Phở broth from Campbell's (Canada). The Campbell's broth is decent but very very mild. So I extend and enhance it with the additions. Works like a champ.

    Tomorrow, I'll add a bit of stew meat (brisket or shank), some thin-sliced steak, all the salad, rice noodles, and have a feast.

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #1644 - December 31st, 2020, 12:52 pm
    Post #1644 - December 31st, 2020, 12:52 pm Post #1644 - December 31st, 2020, 12:52 pm
    Based upon a discussion on LTH, I now can't find, I was inspired to make chicken pot pie. The last time I had eaten this dish was when my mother would give me Swanson's frozen in junior high. I remember it being pretty bad, but I figured the real thing must be good. I found a recipe that that I liked by Stella Parks and went forward: https://www.seriouseats.com/2017/09/how ... t-pie.html .
    Image I took 2 quarts of previously made pressure cooker chicken stock and added 4 lbs. of raw bone-in thighs, onions, carrots, celery, garlic, thyme and bay leaf. I brought the water up to 150 and kept it in that vicinity for 1 hour. I strained the broth and set aside the chicken.
    Image Then I made the filling. First I whisked some plain gelatin with stock and set aside. Then I made a very thick flour/reserved stock roux and added diced onions, carrots and celery and cooked until vegetables were soft.
    ImageI added white wine and 1 quart of reserved stock while constantly stirring to keep it smooth. After it came back to a boil, I added frozen peas, diced pimentos, the previously prepared gelatin, thyme and Worcestershire sauce and kept stirring to keep smooth. I diced up the reserved chicken and added.

    I always thought that pot pies had a flake pastry crust. However, Stella claims that just as many people use a biscuit topping and she gives directions for both. The biscuit topping was about 1/10 the work of the pastry crust, so that is what I went with.
    ImageI poured the filling into a baking dish and dotted the top with biscuit dough and baked for 45 minutes.

    Stella said that if you value the roof of your mouth, allow to cool for at least 20 minutes which we did
    Image

    Absolutely outstanding. My wife often asks if the dish was worth the effort. It was in this case.
  • Post #1645 - December 31st, 2020, 12:59 pm
    Post #1645 - December 31st, 2020, 12:59 pm Post #1645 - December 31st, 2020, 12:59 pm
    lougord99 wrote:Based upon a discussion on LTH, I now can't find, I was inspired to make chicken pot pie.

    I think the conversation to which you refer starts here:

    Spilt Milk, Oak Park: Pot Pie That's Actually Pie

    lougord99 wrote:Absolutely outstanding. My wife often asks if the dish was worth the effort. It was in this case.

    Looks outstanding. One of the truly comforting comfort foods of all time!

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1646 - December 31st, 2020, 1:24 pm
    Post #1646 - December 31st, 2020, 1:24 pm Post #1646 - December 31st, 2020, 1:24 pm
    lougord99 wrote:Based upon a discussion on LTH, I now can't find, I was inspired to make chicken pot pie. The last time I had eaten this dish was when my mother would give me Swanson's frozen in junior high. I remember it being pretty bad, but I figured the real thing must be good. I found a recipe that that I liked by Stella Parks and went forward: https://www.seriouseats.com/2017/09/how ... t-pie.html .
    Image I took 2 quarts of previously made pressure cooker chicken stock and added 4 lbs. of raw bone-in thighs, onions, carrots, celery, garlic, thyme and bay leaf. I brought the water up to 150 and kept it in that vicinity for 1 hour. I strained the broth and set aside the chicken.
    Image Then I made the filling. First I whisked some plain gelatin with stock and set aside. Then I made a very thick flour/reserved stock roux and added diced onions, carrots and celery and cooked until vegetables were soft.
    ImageI added white wine and 1 quart of reserved stock while constantly stirring to keep it smooth. After it came back to a boil, I added frozen peas, diced pimentos, the previously prepared gelatin, thyme and Worcestershire sauce and kept stirring to keep smooth. I diced up the reserved chicken and added.

    I always thought that pot pies had a flake pastry crust. However, Stella claims that just as many people use a biscuit topping and she gives directions for both. The biscuit topping was about 1/10 the work of the pastry crust, so that is what I went with.
    ImageI poured the filling into a baking dish and dotted the top with biscuit dough and baked for 45 minutes.

    Stella said that if you value the roof of your mouth, allow to cool for at least 20 minutes which we did
    Image

    Absolutely outstanding. My wife often asks if the dish was worth the effort. It was in this case.


    I posted an adapted recipe for Chicken pot pie about 10 posts up—and I think it was a bit less involved than yours, but came out exactly as I remembered pot pie tasting as a kid (minus the peas which my hubs hates and plus the fancier and crispier puff pastry in place of the basic Swanson’s pie crust). In particular, it definitely didn’t need the gelatin if you used a good chicken stock —when I make Instant pot stock with bone in chicken, it’s always fully jellied after refrigerating. I can’t wait to make this again—it was probably my favorite new dish I’ve made this year.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #1647 - December 31st, 2020, 4:59 pm
    Post #1647 - December 31st, 2020, 4:59 pm Post #1647 - December 31st, 2020, 4:59 pm
    Kenji's Detroit Pizza recipe. One sausage, one pepperoni.

    Should have sprung for better pepperoni. I like the brick cheese, nice gooey texture. Crust is chewy, kind of focaccia-like.

    Image
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #1648 - December 31st, 2020, 9:21 pm
    Post #1648 - December 31st, 2020, 9:21 pm Post #1648 - December 31st, 2020, 9:21 pm
    Deep breath . . . last meal cooked in 2020. Decided to go luxe. Yeah, it's a little paint-by-the-numbers, as far as NYE goes but it was really nice . . .

    Image
    Shallots & Konosuke HD Petty, 120mm
    Prepping a condiment.

    Image
    Eggs & Konosuke HD Petty, 120mm
    Prepping another condiment.

    Image
    Blini
    Making some blini. These were a tasty 50/50 combination of AP flour and buckwheat flour. Yeasted, whipped egg whites, etc.

    Image
    Uni
    If not now, when?

    Image
    Caviar & Blini "Service"
    Blini, grandeur osetra, golden osetra (both sustainably farm-raised in Holland), creme fraiche, chives, shallot, hard-cooked egg yolk and egg white.

    Image
    Warm Water Lobster Tails
    Steamed these up.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Hey, 2020, f*%k you! :x

    Image
    Decked Out Blini (or, when there's just one, do you say blin?)

    Happier New Year! :D

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1649 - January 1st, 2021, 12:39 am
    Post #1649 - January 1st, 2021, 12:39 am Post #1649 - January 1st, 2021, 12:39 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Deep breath . . . last meal cooked in 2020. Decided to go luxe. Yeah, it's a little paint-by-the-numbers, as far as NYE goes but it was really nice . . .

    Image
    Shallots & Konosuke HD Petty, 120mm
    Prepping a condiment.

    Image
    Eggs & Konosuke HD Petty, 120mm
    Prepping another condiment.

    Image
    Blini
    Making some blini. These were a tasty 50/50 combination of AP flour and buckwheat flour. Yeasted, whipped egg whites, etc.

    Image
    Uni
    If not now, when?

    Image
    Caviar & Blini "Service"
    Blini, grandeur osetra, golden osetra (both sustainably farm-raised in Holland), creme fraiche, chives, shallot, hard-cooked egg yolk and egg white.

    Image
    Warm Water Lobster Tails
    Steamed these up.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Hey, 2020, f*%k you! :x

    Image
    Decked Out Blini (or, when there's just one, do you say blin?)

    Happier New Year! :D

    =R=


    Great post. Stunning meal. This thread, awful as the circumstances prompting it were, is one for the ages :)!!!
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #1650 - January 1st, 2021, 1:45 am
    Post #1650 - January 1st, 2021, 1:45 am Post #1650 - January 1st, 2021, 1:45 am
    JoelF wrote:Kenji's Detroit Pizza recipe. One sausage, one pepperoni.

    Should have sprung for better pepperoni. I like the brick cheese, nice gooey texture. Crust is chewy, kind of focaccia-like.

    They look great, Joel. Happy new year! :)

    boudreaulicious wrote:Great post. Stunning meal. This thread, awful as the circumstances prompting it were, is one for the ages :)!!!

    Thank you. It's not exactly a surprise that people in this community know their way around the kitchen and as you posted, this thread (and a few others) have really highlighted that. That said, I personally am hoping for a much higher proportion of eat-in restaurant meals in 2021. I remember very clearly my last one of those, at Szechwan JMC on Friday March 13, 2020. It's hard to believe that was 314 days ago!! :shock:

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain

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