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Corona cuisine / Social distancing cooking
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  • Post #1711 - January 16th, 2021, 7:27 pm
    Post #1711 - January 16th, 2021, 7:27 pm Post #1711 - January 16th, 2021, 7:27 pm
    G Wiv wrote:Bulgogi, count me a Fan!

    Beautiful! What's not to like? :)

    I was back on the Thai-style curry trail tonight, this time masaman and assorted poultry leftovers . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Shibata Kashima R-2 Gyuto 210mm
    Maesri masaman curry paste, gapi, leftover scallion tops, shredded chicken, basil & kaffir lime leaves, fish sauce, zucchini, coconut milk, bamboo shoots, extra firm tofu, chicken stock, peanut oil, duck fat (didn't end up using either of these fats -- not even sure why I put them out), leftover duck breast, palm sugar and Thai bird chiles. My goal here was something relatively quick and easy into which I could incorporate the leftover duck breast and some shredded chicken that I picked after making stock recently. On that front, mission accomplished. Both proteins worked well. I was surprised by how well the curry resuscitated the picked chicken, which is usually pretty lifeless. Thanks, to Cathy2 and JoelF for the nudging on this.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With rice cooker'd jasmine rice.
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1712 - January 17th, 2021, 6:47 pm
    Post #1712 - January 17th, 2021, 6:47 pm Post #1712 - January 17th, 2021, 6:47 pm
    Had some unused hatcho miso marinade leftover from last week's short ribs and decided it might be nice on some pork belly . . .

    Image
    Marinated & Rinsed Pork Belly
    I marinated the belly overnight, for 12 hours, after which I rinsed it and dried it. You can see from the color of the rinsed pork that the marinade really took.

    Image
    Sear
    Seared the belly in a touch of peanut oil and deglazed with some dashi, after which I released the rest of the fond with a coarsely chopped onion.

    Image
    Dashi Mise En Place
    Softened kelp and bonito flakes get steeped for a few minutes in 170F water, then strained out.

    For a side dish, I decided to riff on Just One Cookbook's Japanese Mille-Feuille Nabe recipe . . .

    Image
    Braised Cabbage Mise En Place & Santoku Of Unknown Origin
    Sansho peppercorns, ginger, scallions, sake, napa cabbage, dashi and soy sauce. This knife -- purchased by a friend who was visiting Japan and brought back to me as a gift -- is probably the most used knife that I've never documented (mainly because I don't really know its origin). But it's a great all-arounder and one I tend to leave on the board all day, every day. Unlike some of my other J-knives, no one else in the family is too intimidated to use it, which is nice.

    Image
    Cabbage Pot
    In many examples of Japanese-style mille-feuille nabe I found online, not only are the cabbage sections positioned in the pot much more artistically, but slices of raw pork belly are placed between the cabbage leaves. Since we were having pork belly as our main course, that seemed unnecessary. In any case, the cabbage sections are positioned to tightly fill the pot and about 5 cups of dashi + the other ingredients are poured in, after which it all cooks, covered, on the stove top until the cabbage is soft. I added the sansho peppercorns (in a little cotton pouch), since I had them on hand and wanted to add a mild kick to the dish. There was also a very potent sauce for this (forgot to shoot it) that included equal parts of fresh-squeezed lime juice and soy sauce, a splash of mirin, a few drops of toasted sesame oil and a generous shake of togarashi.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With leftover jasmine rice. Very happy I made these dishes. They were just right for a gray, snowy, wintery day . . . hearty and comforting, and some tasty flavor combinations that aren't on the hot rotation in our kitchen.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1713 - January 17th, 2021, 7:48 pm
    Post #1713 - January 17th, 2021, 7:48 pm Post #1713 - January 17th, 2021, 7:48 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:I added the sansho peppercorns (in a little cotton pouch), since I had them on hand and wanted to add a mild kick to the dish.

    You technique and skill range increase visibly each and every day. Its like Groundhog Day where at the end Phil plays the piano, ice sculpting, speaks French and is a doctor, among other skills.

    Me, two packs of instant oatmeal my wife made me and ate at my desk in my upstairs office while watching Mark Wiens on Youtube. Not much of an appetite and not feeling well, not covid a recurrence of sciatica and its hard for me to walk. I'll be fine in a day or two.

    Sciatica, Not a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1714 - January 17th, 2021, 8:05 pm
    Post #1714 - January 17th, 2021, 8:05 pm Post #1714 - January 17th, 2021, 8:05 pm
    that pork belly cabbage looks great! rich cabbage night all around: we made a roast chicken with schmaltzy cabbage (from smitten) and it was very cozy. to contrast, i served it with a crunchy salad of shredded carrot, sliced celery, diced radish, scallion, dressed with lemon and evoo.
  • Post #1715 - January 18th, 2021, 12:11 am
    Post #1715 - January 18th, 2021, 12:11 am Post #1715 - January 18th, 2021, 12:11 am
    G Wiv wrote:You technique and skill range increase visibly each and every day. Its like Groundhog Day where at the end Phil plays the piano, ice sculpting, speaks French and is a doctor, among other skills.

    :oops: Coming from an experienced professional like you, that means a lot. And yes, life has been much like Groundhog Day for the past several months. I suppose repetition does have some benefits. I spend a lot of time thinking about cooking these days. And trying to vary the meal plan has me trying new things, both with known ingredients and one with which I'm less familiar.

    G Wiv wrote:Me, two packs of instant oatmeal my wife made me and ate at my desk in my upstairs office while watching Mark Wiens on Youtube. Not much of an appetite and not feeling well, not covid a recurrence of sciatica and its hard for me to walk. I'll be fine in a day or two.

    Sciatica, Not a Fan!

    Me neither. :( That really sucks. I hope you're out of pain, soon.

    annak wrote:that pork belly cabbage looks great! rich cabbage night all around: we made a roast chicken with schmaltzy cabbage (from smitten) and it was very cozy. to contrast, i served it with a crunchy salad of shredded carrot, sliced celery, diced radish, scallion, dressed with lemon and evoo.

    Yeah, it's definitely a cabbage-y time of year. Your dinner sounds great. :)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1716 - January 18th, 2021, 4:03 pm
    Post #1716 - January 18th, 2021, 4:03 pm Post #1716 - January 18th, 2021, 4:03 pm
    Second day of breakfast upstairs due to back. Bride brought me eggs, toast, sausage, she even included a sidecar of Valentina. Mark Wiens on Youtube, breakfast and a kiss, not a bad morning.

    click to enlarge
    Image

    Mark Wiens, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1717 - January 18th, 2021, 4:35 pm
    Post #1717 - January 18th, 2021, 4:35 pm Post #1717 - January 18th, 2021, 4:35 pm
    Beef in Massaman curry.

    First make the curry paste.
    ImageGuajillo chilis stemmed, seeded and ribs removed, torn up into pieces. Cardamon seeds ( not sure seeds is the correct term - the stuff inside the husk ). Whole cumin, whole coriander seed, whole peppercorns, whole cloves, ground cinnamon, lemongrass with tough outer leaves and bottom inch or 2 removed sliced, grated ginger, garlic and shallots.

    Soak the guajillo in water for 30 minutes, toast the cardamon, cumin, coriander and peppercorns in a dry pan.
    ImagePut everything in a stick blender jar and blend with a little chili soaking water until there is a rich thick paste.
    ImageAssemble everything for the curry. Chuck roast, roughly chunked. Onion sliced. Coconut milk, previously made curry paste, roasted peanuts, palm sugar, fish sauce, tamarind pulp.

    Brown the chunks of beef in oil, then slice into bite size pieces. On high heat, quickly brown the onions and remove. Pour off any remaining oil.
    ImageAdd 1/2 coconut milk to pot and boil until the oil starts separating from the milk. Add the curry paste and cook for several minutes. Then add remaining coconut milk, palm sugar, peanuts and fish sauce.
    ImageCover the tamarind pulp with hot water and let sit for 15 minutes. Then break it all up with a fork and pour into a strainer over a bowl. Press down and get tamarind sauce in bowl. Add tamarind sauce to curry.

    Add back beef and onions and simmer for 2 hours.
    ImageServe over rice.

    Massaman has just a hint of heat. It is very sweet and has a high sour content from the tamarind. To my palette, one of the best flavors is the cardamon. A Gordon household favorite.
  • Post #1718 - January 18th, 2021, 5:28 pm
    Post #1718 - January 18th, 2021, 5:28 pm Post #1718 - January 18th, 2021, 5:28 pm
    G Wiv wrote:Second day of breakfast upstairs due to back. Bride brought me eggs, toast, sausage, she even included a sidecar of Valentina.

    Ms. Wiv, count me a fan! :)

    lougord99 wrote:Beef in Massaman curry.

    First make the curry paste . . .

    Nice! Having just made this -- starting with a can of Maesri curry paste -- I'm definitely up for trying it from scratch. Thanks for laying out the steps, Lou.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1719 - January 18th, 2021, 9:52 pm
    Post #1719 - January 18th, 2021, 9:52 pm Post #1719 - January 18th, 2021, 9:52 pm
    RID'ing myself of a bunch of inventory today. Unused chicken from a stock run last week, the end of some crumbled feta, mini tomatoes that were just sitting around not getting any better, plus spinach and cremini mushrooms that were taking up quite a bit of prime real estate in the fridge . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Michael Rader, 52100 gyuto, koa wood, 240mm
    Crushed garlic, dried dill weed, dried oregano, salt, black pepper, onion, lemon, cooked and squeezed spinach, red wine, evoo, crumbled feta and cremini mushrooms. That was 2 pounds of spinach that netted out after cooking and squeezing at 1 pound, 2 ounces.

    Image
    Assembled Casserole
    At this point, it was ready to bake but before that, I sauteed the onions in evoo. Then I sauteed the mushrooms in evoo, garlic and red wine. Once those had both cooked, I mixed them with the spinach, feta, oregano, dill and juice from half the lemon. Then I baked it at 350F for about an hour, covered lightly with foil for the first 30 minutes.

    Image
    Mini Tomato Salad
    Another 'use it or lose it' situation, I sliced these little guys in half and mixed them with evoo, lemon juice, balsamic, fresh basil, dried oregano, salt and black pepper.

    Image
    Charcoal Grilled Chicken
    My basic everyday rub: salt, black pepper, onion powder, garlic powder and oregano. These spent about 30 minutes covered on the indirect side of a 2-stage fire. They were surprisingly small pieces but there was still quite a bit leftover for upcoming lunches. I normally get chicken (thighs!) from the grocery store but this bird was from Costco, hence the drumsticks and "party" cut wing pieces. :x

    Image
    Plated Up
    Charcoal-grilled chicken, spinach-mushroom-feta casserole, tomato salad and this week's edition of homemade coleslaw.

    Happy Monday! :)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1720 - January 19th, 2021, 6:56 am
    Post #1720 - January 19th, 2021, 6:56 am Post #1720 - January 19th, 2021, 6:56 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Nice! Having just made this -- starting with a can of Maesri curry paste -- I'm definitely up for trying it from scratch. Thanks for laying out the steps, Lou.
    =R=

    The recipe I used also called for some toasted shrimp paste ( wrap in aluminum foil to toast ). However, it had been a while since I had used my shrimp paste and I found it so dried out that it was unusable.
  • Post #1721 - January 19th, 2021, 9:23 am
    Post #1721 - January 19th, 2021, 9:23 am Post #1721 - January 19th, 2021, 9:23 am
    Ronnie -- that looks really nice. I wish the love of my life liked cooked spinach (or any cooked greens for that matter). Thankfully those grape tomatoes mostly last pretty long on the countertop before they turn into tomaisins.

    Lou -- Lacking shrimp paste, a little miso and/or anchovy paste will give you the salt and funk. It's not critical, and I'm betting a fair number of restaurants skip it to avoid having to note for seafood allergy, but grab every bit of umami you can get!

    For me, having a day off meant I could cook most of the afternoon, and it went into banchan: hot and mild shredded radish, fish cake (from the freezer with some sesame oil and scallion), cucumber, kimchi (from a jar), and a warm mushroom/cabbage with fermented bean paste (I used some sliced leftover brussels sprouts and miso). All that accompanied a skirt steak I butterflied for bulgogi, some rice, and the last few butter lettuce leaves for wrapping.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #1722 - January 19th, 2021, 7:32 pm
    Post #1722 - January 19th, 2021, 7:32 pm Post #1722 - January 19th, 2021, 7:32 pm
    JoelF wrote:For me, having a day off meant I could cook most of the afternoon, and it went into banchan: hot and mild shredded radish, fish cake (from the freezer with some sesame oil and scallion), cucumber, kimchi (from a jar), and a warm mushroom/cabbage with fermented bean paste (I used some sliced leftover brussels sprouts and miso). All that accompanied a skirt steak I butterflied for bulgogi, some rice, and the last few butter lettuce leaves for wrapping.

    This sounds great. If you have a recipe for the radish that you'd care to share, I'd really appreciate it.

    My family has been clamoring for this, so baked rotini again tonight. Prep virtually identical to the last time I made it . . .

    Image
    Baked Rotini
    With hot Italian sausage, three cheeses, etc.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Baked rotini with leftover roasted broccoli and mixed chard.

    I won't go so far as to say it's my favorite but it's a delicious and comforting dish that's really easy to make. Most of the work is in the clean-up.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1723 - January 19th, 2021, 8:10 pm
    Post #1723 - January 19th, 2021, 8:10 pm Post #1723 - January 19th, 2021, 8:10 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    JoelF wrote:For me, having a day off meant I could cook most of the afternoon, and it went into banchan: hot and mild shredded radish...

    This sounds great. If you have a recipe for the radish that you'd care to share, I'd really appreciate it.

    I had a smallish daikon, shredded on a microplane box grater, which wasn't right: the shreds were too thin (but wide). The food processor or mandoline would have been better.
    The recipe I used was basically for each cup of radish, add about 3/4 tsp salt, 1 tbs each rice vinegar and sugar, and either a small pinch (for mild) up to a tsp of gochugaru (Korean chile powder). I added sesame seeds and finely chopped scallion.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #1724 - January 19th, 2021, 8:23 pm
    Post #1724 - January 19th, 2021, 8:23 pm Post #1724 - January 19th, 2021, 8:23 pm
    Been playing with my new Instant Pot Air Fryer Lid along with trying to cut most non-veg carbs and calories —tonight’s experiment was fried chicken. Brined boneless skinless thighs in buttermilk seasoned with turmeric, Spice House pot herbs, ground pepper and kosher salt, then “breaded” with pulverized dried pumpkin seeds. Drizzled with hot sauce, it was pretty damn good. The guys’ version with panko and a drizzle of olive oil looked a bit more typical but I’d make mine again. No pics—next time!
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #1725 - January 19th, 2021, 8:56 pm
    Post #1725 - January 19th, 2021, 8:56 pm Post #1725 - January 19th, 2021, 8:56 pm
    Like Ronnie’s baked pasta night above, this snowy evening was red sauce cozy: meatballs (pork and parm and garlic) in simple marinara with linguine, plus Caesar salad and grapefruit .

    Tomorrow we are trying the well loved (inexplicably so?) Serious Eats recipe for Halal Cart Chicken and Rice.

    Not to whine but, I just spent another 10 minutes trying to attach an image - from three different browsers, and then also from my phone, with no luck. I have designed and maintain 3 different professional websites with good traffic and lots of functionality, so I don't know why there is such a mystery here. Every time I click attach image I get a blank screen and the whole post is lost. Is there a *recent* how-to guide somewhere on the site? Thanks!
  • Post #1726 - January 19th, 2021, 9:10 pm
    Post #1726 - January 19th, 2021, 9:10 pm Post #1726 - January 19th, 2021, 9:10 pm
    annak wrote:Like Ronnie’s baked pasta night above, this snowy evening was red sauce cozy: meatballs (pork and parm and garlic) in simple marinara with linguine, plus Caesar salad and grapefruit .

    Tomorrow we are trying the well loved (inexplicably so?) Serious Eats recipe for Halal Cart Chicken and Rice.

    Not to whine but, I just spent another 10 minutes trying to attach an image - from three different browsers, and then also from my phone, with no luck. I have designed and maintain 3 different professional websites with good traffic and lots of functionality, so I don't know why there is such a mystery here. Every time I click attach image I get a blank screen and the whole post is lost. Is there a *recent* how-to guide somewhere on the site? Thanks!

    Anna,

    I'm really sorry but Upload Images is not functional right now. It's being addressed but it's part of a larger, systematic fix that's taking far longer than we expected or hoped it would (the perils of Upwork). We did post about this in Site Chat hoping that everyone would see it and not spin their wheels. Again, I'm sorry those announcements were not adequate.

    In any case, images can be uploaded to an outside server (flickr, google images. imgur, etc.) and linked to display here. But if that's too burdensome, please email your images to me and I'll email you back links you can embed in your posts. If you don't have my email address, please send me a PM and I'll give it to you.

    Many thanks and again, my apologies.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1727 - January 19th, 2021, 9:22 pm
    Post #1727 - January 19th, 2021, 9:22 pm Post #1727 - January 19th, 2021, 9:22 pm
    thanks for letting me know! i am sorry there is site trouble and glad it isn't my idiocy. i couldn't figure out how there would be marvelous photos from some but mine would never upload. not that they're marvelous! but just part of the sharing game. thanks for all the maintenance!
  • Post #1728 - January 20th, 2021, 12:12 am
    Post #1728 - January 20th, 2021, 12:12 am Post #1728 - January 20th, 2021, 12:12 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Meaty red sauce & eggplant dealio. Garnished with pecorino romano and chive. Considering the lazy way I prepped the eggplant, this turned out way better than I'd expected. It simmered on low for a few hours, and I added the eggplant for about the last 90 minutes of cooking.

    =R=



    I tried this earlier this week. I thought that it was excellent although I replaced the meat with mild sausage. It was a dish that was a lot better than I expected. It was great use of the huge eggplant that I received from the produce rescue last week.
    ==========================

    For the past 25 years or more, I have been using a set of Henckel International Eversharp Pro Knives from Japan. I found them on sale at a May's Department Store for about $90 which seemed like a lot back then. They have done well and work well in a home kitchen. (If I was working in a kitchen professionally, I would use the German Henckel knives.)

    The only other knives in my collection is a variety of paring knives that my wife and friends have purchased. This week, I used a Oxxo Good Grips MA-55 to cut a ham sandwich and the blade failed and is currently at a 90 degree angle to the handle. There is no evidence of corrosion. That was a new one for me.
  • Post #1729 - January 21st, 2021, 12:42 pm
    Post #1729 - January 21st, 2021, 12:42 pm Post #1729 - January 21st, 2021, 12:42 pm
    jlawrence01 wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Meaty red sauce & eggplant dealio. Garnished with pecorino romano and chive. Considering the lazy way I prepped the eggplant, this turned out way better than I'd expected. It simmered on low for a few hours, and I added the eggplant for about the last 90 minutes of cooking.

    I tried this earlier this week. I thought that it was excellent although I replaced the meat with mild sausage. It was a dish that was a lot better than I expected. It was great use of the huge eggplant that I received from the produce rescue last week.

    Nice. One of my primary cooking goals over the past several months has been to use everything I have on hand. Sometimes that involves pantry or freezer items that have seemingly been around forever. Other times, it involves fading produce that I bought on a lark and then nearly forgot about. I always feel good when I can work these items into a meal that also happens to taste half-decent.

    jlawrence01 wrote:For the past 25 years or more, I have been using a set of Henckel International Eversharp Pro Knives from Japan. I found them on sale at a May's Department Store for about $90 which seemed like a lot back then. They have done well and work well in a home kitchen. (If I was working in a kitchen professionally, I would use the German Henckel knives.)

    The only other knives in my collection is a variety of paring knives that my wife and friends have purchased. This week, I used a Oxxo Good Grips MA-55 to cut a ham sandwich and the blade failed and is currently at a 90 degree angle to the handle. There is no evidence of corrosion. That was a new one for me.

    That is utterly bizarre. Did it twist at the tang or did the edge curl?

    This morning I had some additional time, so instead of the usual (yogurt + cereal), I reheated the end of my 'weekly' pot of beans, as well as the last of some breakfast sausages I cooked over the weekend. Topped it with a couple of eggs . . .

    Image
    Plated Up
    White beans and eggs (and a jalapeno from the bean pot) with breakfast sausage. Garnished with parsley and cotija.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1730 - January 21st, 2021, 8:55 pm
    Post #1730 - January 21st, 2021, 8:55 pm Post #1730 - January 21st, 2021, 8:55 pm
    Not the greatest planning but a roundabout route to more eggs for dinner tonight. Because good versions are getting trickier and trickier to find, I decided make my own egg foo young. I did some poking around on the internet and using information from a few different sources, put together a plan. Considering it was my first attempt, it went pretty well. First things first, I decided to make the sauce . . . :?

    Image
    Sauce Mise En Place
    Salt, flour, corn starch (ended up not using it), msg, granulated sugar, homemade chicken stock, toasted sesame oil, dark soy sauce, vegetable oil, onions & garlic and white pepper. After the onions and garlic brown in the oil, the flour is added to create a roux. After that, everything else gets added. When it gets to the desired thickness, the sauce is strained. I decided to hold off adding the corn starch and I'm glad I did because the flour was enough to thicken the sauce and I ended up not needing it at all.

    Next up, prepping for the EFY . . .

    Image
    Mung Bean Sprouts
    This is about two pounds, roughly cut up with the spatula. Other than some scallions, these are the only vegetables I used. I briefly considered adding some thinly sliced cabbage and may do that next time.

    Image
    Blanching
    Per one youtube video I watched, I blanched the sprouts in my wok for about 3 minutes, after which I drained them and pressed them dry pretty vigorously in a colander. At that point, they had softened a bit but were still plenty crunchy.

    Image
    Char Siu BBQ Pork
    Decided last night to take some of the leftover char siu sauce I made a few months ago and sous vide some chunks of pork shoulder in it (19 hours @ 145F). When it was done, I let it cool off, then grilled it over lump charcoal for about 15 minutes on the indirect side of a two-stage fire.

    Image
    EFY Mise En Place
    Shrimp, char siu bbq pork, toasted sesame oil, vegetable oil, mung bean sprouts, granulated sugar, msg, white pepper, eggs, scallions, flour and salt. Needless to say (and not surprisingly) many of the ingredients in the sauce also appear in the egg foo young.

    Image
    Char Siu BBQ Pork & Konosuke HD Petty, 210mm
    Cubing the pork during the prep. This is a fun knife and somewhat of a strange one, given its length and overall profile.

    Image
    EFY Batter
    All in. I ended up using 6 of the eggs, and adding a bit more flour along the way.

    Image
    Wok-Frying The Patties
    I gently placed the patties in the oil (~350F) using a 1/2-cup ladle to curl them out. It worked out pretty well, though they were not exactly uniform from patty to patty.

    Image
    EFY Draining
    6 eggs, 2 pounds of bean sprouts, a cup of diced char siu bbq and 8 shrimp yielded 10.75 patties.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With Zojirushi'd jasmine rice and leftover cabbage. Garnished with scallion tops and Gary Wiviott-recipe chili oil. The one thing I'd be sure to do differently next time is be even more aggressive -- both with the seasonings and the scallions in the patties. Even so, these were really good. I'll admit I had 3 of them. :oops:

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1731 - January 22nd, 2021, 12:35 am
    Post #1731 - January 22nd, 2021, 12:35 am Post #1731 - January 22nd, 2021, 12:35 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:

    That is utterly bizarre. Did it twist at the tang or did the edge curl?


    =R=


    It twisted at the tang. All of my other paring knives are full tang.

    I really like to choose my own knives but someone always wants to buy one for me.
  • Post #1732 - January 22nd, 2021, 2:35 am
    Post #1732 - January 22nd, 2021, 2:35 am Post #1732 - January 22nd, 2021, 2:35 am
    Beautiful EFY!,
  • Post #1733 - January 22nd, 2021, 5:55 am
    Post #1733 - January 22nd, 2021, 5:55 am Post #1733 - January 22nd, 2021, 5:55 am
    jilter wrote:Beautiful EFY!,

    Agree 100%, nice EFY Ronnie!

    Pan seared Costco strip steak on a bed of arugula, mushrooms and tomato. Olive oil, lemon juice, pan drippings s/p made for drizzle. Gosh Darn tasty.

    Image
    Image

    Strip steak, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1734 - January 22nd, 2021, 9:21 am
    Post #1734 - January 22nd, 2021, 9:21 am Post #1734 - January 22nd, 2021, 9:21 am
    lougord99 wrote:4 days with a duck

    Ahhhh, the 70's, fond memories. At least what I am able to actually remember.
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1735 - January 22nd, 2021, 9:36 am
    Post #1735 - January 22nd, 2021, 9:36 am Post #1735 - January 22nd, 2021, 9:36 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:This sounds great. If you have a recipe for the radish that you'd care to share, I'd really appreciate it.

    JoelF's radish recipe sounds delicious. I've been eating a lot of Korean radish from H-Mart Niles lately (Korean Mu as opposed to Japanese Daikon) Mu are larger diameter, rounder and, to me, missing the occasional hint of bitter with daikon. I love both, slightly prefer Korean Mu.

    The following is often served with Korean fried chicken, both home and restaurant, cuts through oily flavors. Simple, but packs a lot of taste. I've been using it as accompaniment to most everything, from sandwiches to BBQ to snacking with rice and nori.

    Recipe suggest wait 2-3 days to eat, I typically start munching after a couple of hours.
    =-=-=-=-=-=

    Korean Pickled Radish for Fried Chicken
    ChiKin Mu

    Whenever we order fried chicken in Korea, this pickled radish comes along with it. Usually the amount they give isn’t enough. So it is great to make extra picked radish at home, or if you make Korean fried chicken at home, you can make this picked radish too. It can’t be any easier or simpler than this. Try it someday.

    Yield: 6 Cups Pickled Radish

    Main Ingredients:

    5 Cups Korean Radish (About 1 1/2 lb)
    1/3 Cup White Vinegar
    1/3 Cup Water
    1/3 Cup White Sugar
    1 tsp Salt

    Directions:
    Peel the Korean radish.
    Slice the radish into 1/2 inch slices.
    Cut the radish into 1/2 inch cubes.

    Mix 1/3 cup of white vinegar, 1/3 cup of water, and 1/3 cup of white sugar, and 1 tsp of salt in a mixing bowl until the sugar dissolves. It is important to use white vinegar. Flavored vinegar will change the taste. You can add more sugar or vinegar; however, with my experimentation, a 1:1:1 ratio for the vinegar, water, and sugar tastes the most delicious.
    Mix in the radish.
    Put it in wide bottomed container and leave it at room temperature overnight. Then place it in the refrigerator for about 2 to 3 days before serving.
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1736 - January 22nd, 2021, 10:47 am
    Post #1736 - January 22nd, 2021, 10:47 am Post #1736 - January 22nd, 2021, 10:47 am
    jlawrence01 wrote:It twisted at the tang. All of my other paring knives are full tang.

    I really like to choose my own knives but someone always wants to buy one for me.

    That is really unusual. And yeah, I understand about choosing for yourself. I feel that way about pretty much everything in my kitchen. I was wondering the other day what percentage of kitchen items are purchased as gifts for people who are pickier or more knowledgeable than the giver. My guess is that it's a lot.

    G Wiv wrote:
    jilter wrote:Beautiful EFY!,

    Strip steak, count me a Fan!

    Thanks, guys. That's one nice looking steak, my friend. Even nicer to see that you're back to cooking, too! :)

    G Wiv wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:This sounds great. If you have a recipe for the radish that you'd care to share, I'd really appreciate it.

    JoelF's radish recipe sounds delicious. I've been eating a lot of Korean radish from H-Mart Niles lately (Korean Mu as opposed to Japanese Daikon) Mu are larger diameter, rounder and, to me, missing the occasional hint of bitter with daikon. I love both, slightly prefer Korean Mu . . .

    Thanks, to both of you guys. I'm now in possession of some daikon and some red radishes, so I'm going to do something with them very soon.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1737 - January 22nd, 2021, 10:57 am
    Post #1737 - January 22nd, 2021, 10:57 am Post #1737 - January 22nd, 2021, 10:57 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Thanks, to both of you guys. I'm now in possession of some daikon and some red radishes, so I'm going to do something with them very soon.

    Speaking of both daikon and red radish the cool kids over at Chinese Cooking Demystified recently posted a Guizhou-style pickle technique using both. I, for one, plan on making it soon.

    Guizhou-style pickle

    Pickled Daikon, Guizhou-style (酸萝卜)

    Chinese Cooking Demystified
    Pickled Daikon! This Guizhou-style pickle is a classic ingredient in the province, and's used in a number of dishes. Its characteristic pink color comes from using red-skinned daikon in the process - an ingredient unfortunately unavailable outside of China - so we'll be using some red radishes together with some bog standard white Daikon in order to get the job done.

    Pickled Daikon, Guizhou-style (酸萝卜)

    INGREDIENTS

    - Daikon (白萝卜), 400g.
    - Red radishes (樱桃萝卜), 100g. Note that this ingredient isn't available everywhere in China. Only peels needed.
    - Salt, 1 tsp.
    - Ginger (姜). A couple pieces or ~1.5 inches.
    - White rice vinegar (白米醋), 4 parts, ~1/2 cup
    - Sugar, 1 part, ~2 tbsp

    Our recommendation re vinegar/sugar quantity is to first layer everything in your pickling jar, then using a measuring cup pour in enough vinegar to cover it. Depending on your jar, this might be more or less than the half cup we used, so adjust your sugar accordingly - you're looking for a ratio of four parts vinegar to one part sugar. For example, if you use 3/4 cup of rice vinegar, add 3 tbsp of sugar instead of two.

    PROCESS

    1. Cut the daikon into roughly 1cm x 1cm x 2 inch sticks. Peel the red radish.
    2. Add the 1 tsp salt to the daikon sticks & radish peels. Toss to combine well. Let it sit for 20 minutes.
    3. Squeeze some more of the liquid from the Daikon out, and give it a couple more tosses.
    4. Layer your pickles: add the ginger at the bottom, then press down a layer of daikon sticks, then add a layer of radish skin. Repeat layering the daikon and the radish skin until the jar is filled.
    5. Pour in your vinegar - take note of how much vinegar you added. We're working off a ratio of four parts vinegar to one part sugar. For our jar, we added a half cup vinegar, so then we sprinkled in two tablespoons sugar.

    The pickle will be ready in two days.

    Also, note that we just used the peeled radish for something else, but if you don't have any plans for them, feel free to just slice them in half and toss them in your pickling jar with everything else.
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1738 - January 22nd, 2021, 11:01 am
    Post #1738 - January 22nd, 2021, 11:01 am Post #1738 - January 22nd, 2021, 11:01 am
    G Wiv wrote:Speaking of both daikon and red radish the cool kids over at Chinese Cooking Demystified recently posted a Guizhou-style pickle technique using both. I, for one, plan on making it soon.

    Yeah, thanks. That video is pretty much how these items ended up in my cart but I got a lot more of both than I expected, so I was looking for some additional options.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1739 - January 22nd, 2021, 11:23 am
    Post #1739 - January 22nd, 2021, 11:23 am Post #1739 - January 22nd, 2021, 11:23 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Yeah, thanks. That video is pretty much how these items ended up in my cart

    I had a sneaking suspicion that was the case. We can compare notes after we make the recipe.
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1740 - January 23rd, 2021, 6:52 pm
    Post #1740 - January 23rd, 2021, 6:52 pm Post #1740 - January 23rd, 2021, 6:52 pm
    G Wiv wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Yeah, thanks. That video is pretty much how these items ended up in my cart

    I had a sneaking suspicion that was the case. We can compare notes after we make the recipe.

    Indeed, though most of my daikon froze overnight (forgot I'd left it outside :x), so I'm moving this project back to later in the week.

    Tonight it was a RID-focused take on cauliflower fried rice . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Konosuke Fujiyama Blue #2 Gyuto, 210mm
    Scallion tops, carrot, crushed garlic, flat omelet, Chinese sausage, leftover char siu bbq pork, peanut oil, oyster sauce, toasted sesame oil, peas, dark soy sauce, soy sauce, "riced" cauliflower, homemade sambal, onion, white pepper, leftover u-16 shrimp, shallot and scallion bottoms.

    The good news is that I got RID of a bunch of stuff that was hanging around. The bad news is that I didn't manage to entirely finish any of it off so now, with the leftover cfr, I actually have less room in the fridge than I had before I started. :(

    This Konosuke was the first Japanese gyuto that I ever purchased. I have lot of knives that I love but if I'd just stopped here, I would have been absolutely fine. This knife does it all with an easy, reliable precision.

    Image
    Plated Up

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain

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