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Corona cuisine / Social distancing cooking
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  • Post #1831 - February 12th, 2021, 6:51 pm
    Post #1831 - February 12th, 2021, 6:51 pm Post #1831 - February 12th, 2021, 6:51 pm
    G Wiv wrote:In the last month I've been to both Hagen's and Fish Keg, like them both, though the service at Fish Keg makes Hagen's seem amateur. (wrong orders, abrupt, hot/cold mixed in same bag, distracted, impatient)

    Giovanna post in the Culver's thread reminds me, even though I've been dissing Hagen's counter service pretty hard, Hagen's fish sandwich is one of, if not the, best in Chicagoland.
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1832 - February 12th, 2021, 8:22 pm
    Post #1832 - February 12th, 2021, 8:22 pm Post #1832 - February 12th, 2021, 8:22 pm
    Took a wild stab at Souped Up Recipes' Lions Head Meatballs. At one critical point, things went off the rails in a major way but in the end, I don't think it affected the flavor of the final dish too much. It tasted great, even though it wasn't fantastic looking. All's well that ends well, I guess. The prep essentially breaks down into three phases: aromatic water, meatballs and braising liquid . . .

    Image
    Aromatic Water Mise En Place & Gihei HAP40 Nakiri, 165mm
    Smashed garlic cloves, sichuan peppercorns, scallions, corn starch, water and smashed ginger root. All of this except the corn starch go into the food processor to create a puree. And wow, that nakiri!

    Image
    Aromatic Water
    Once processed, the aromatic water is strained, after which it's combined with the corn starch and set aside for later.

    Image
    Pork Belly & Perceval Forged Chef Knife, 270mm
    I bought this knife while on a trip to France about 10 years ago. Not sure what possessed me but it's beautiful and useful for some larger butchering tasks.

    Image
    Meatball Preparation
    Bamboo shoots, pork belly, salt, oyster sauce, granulated sugar, soy sauce, white pepper and shiitake mushrooms.

    Image
    Pork Belly & Dexter Cleaver
    Oh, this didn't go well. First, I tried my meat grinder but the meat was too fatty/not cold enough and it smeared pretty badly. So, I figured I should mince it up by hand. The Dexter handled it but there was just so much fat it also began the smear. I should have just followed SUR's method, the traditional method, but I figured there was more than one way to handle it. And I'm sure there is but I didn't get there today. In my defense, her belly was a lot leaner than what I had on hand. Since these are supposed to be very tender meatballs -- with no binder other than corn starch -- I think that getting the correct cut on the meat is critical.

    Image
    Further Meatball Prep
    Oyster sauce, soy sauce, bamboo shoots, granulated sugar, diced pork belly, white pepper, aromatic water, salt, shiitake mushrooms and corn starch.

    Image
    Meatball Preparation
    Most everything now mixed together in the large bowl, with the aromatic water and corn starch now combined into a slurry in the pyrex.

    Image
    Meatball Mixture
    Everything combined and having been stirred in one direction for about 5 minutes. I could sense that I was heading toward trouble. With no binder and very fatty meat, this mixture was pretty loose. I could form balls but they had no structural integrity. Once formed, the balls are supposed to be briefly fried before their final cook but I wasn't sure that was the best move here. I pondered it while I went on to the next step.

    Image
    Braising Liquid Mise En Place
    Cinnamon stick, bay leaves, star anise & sichuan peppercorns, soy sauce, dark soy sauce, ginger root, smashed garlic cloves, scallions, shaoxing wine, peanut oil and granulated sugar.

    Image
    Building The Braise
    After the sugar gets caramelized in the hot oil, everything else goes in until it becomes fragrant. My kitchen smelled awesome!

    Image
    Braising Liquid
    Once everything starts smelling great, several cups of water are added and it's all brought to a simmer, awaiting the par-cooked meatballs.

    Image
    "Meatballs?"
    More like meatblobs. In lieu of frying, I decided to convection roast these for about 15 minutes. I just didn't want to commit to a large frying step knowing that the entire dish was on the precipice. They were incredibly fragile but smelled and tasted great.

    Image
    Braising
    I was able to get the par-roasted meatblobs into the braise more or less intact. They filled the pot nicely, so there wasn't too much jostling, which would have caused further deterioration. These simmered, covered, for just over an hour.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With steamed bok choy and garnished with chili crisp. I'm really glad I stuck with this because after those meatblobs came out of the oven, I was considering pitching them and saving the braising liquid for another day. But in the end, the dish was really tasty. The meatblobs were delicious, even if super ugly and a bit more fragile than they should have been. And the resulting soup was also fantastic. Next time, I'd either cut the belly in the traditional manner or try it with shoulder instead of belly. And yeah, I think frying the balls would be best, too.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1833 - February 12th, 2021, 8:53 pm
    Post #1833 - February 12th, 2021, 8:53 pm Post #1833 - February 12th, 2021, 8:53 pm
    I've made a completely different dish called lion's head meatballs, also called porcupine meatballs: you roll the meatball in rice and steam them, and the rice puffs outward looking like a mane or porcupine quills.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #1834 - February 12th, 2021, 11:43 pm
    Post #1834 - February 12th, 2021, 11:43 pm Post #1834 - February 12th, 2021, 11:43 pm
    JoelF wrote:I've made a completely different dish called lion's head meatballs, also called porcupine meatballs: you roll the meatball in rice and steam them, and the rice puffs outward looking like a mane or porcupine quills.

    Per Souped Up Recipes, these supposedly "got the name from its shape, which resembles the head of Chinese guardian lions." My version resembled no creature real or imagined. :oops:

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1835 - February 13th, 2021, 7:39 pm
    Post #1835 - February 13th, 2021, 7:39 pm Post #1835 - February 13th, 2021, 7:39 pm
    As annoying as the weather has been, the world outside our house is just one big walk-in freezer, so meats are keeping very nicely in a cooler outside our back door. And my garage is holding in the mid-30's F, so produce, etc. stored there is lasting a while, too. I'm still working the RID path, and managed to finish off the dark/better end of last week's pork loin roast tonight . . .

    Image
    Eggplant & Kohetsu Addict Blue #2 Gyuto, 240mm
    I should know by now but this knife never fails to surprise me. Honestly, who needs a mandolin? You'd think this beefy knife couldn't handle such thin cuts but it handles them easily and accurately. Here, I sliced the eggplant into thin discs and salted them for about 90 minutes to draw out some of their bitterness.

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    Garlic, Shallots & Yu Kurosaki VG10 Fujin Petty, 120mm
    I sauteed these briefly in evoo before adding the drained eggplant, some chopped tomatoes, some dried oregano and some water, then simmered it all over low heat for about an hour. The Fujin knives are so beautiful, I wish I had a pocket knife version, so it could be part of my edc.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Even though they were cut from the better end of the loin roast, the pork chops needed some help. I brined them, dredged them, pan-fried them to create a crust and then finished them in the oven. I served them with the stewed eggplant and some leftover pan sauce from last weekend's roast.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1836 - February 14th, 2021, 3:15 pm
    Post #1836 - February 14th, 2021, 3:15 pm Post #1836 - February 14th, 2021, 3:15 pm
    Image

    Winter melon, Hanalogo mushroom and Ta Ku Choy soup. Stock from a stewing hen simmered for twelve hours with star anise, galangal, garlic and Chinese celery.
    "I live on good soup, not on fine words." -Moliere
  • Post #1837 - February 14th, 2021, 7:24 pm
    Post #1837 - February 14th, 2021, 7:24 pm Post #1837 - February 14th, 2021, 7:24 pm
    bw77 wrote:Winter melon, Hanalogo mushroom and Ta Ku Choy soup. Stock from a stewing hen simmered for twelve hours with star anise, galangal, garlic and Chinese celery.

    Nice. If not now for soup, when? It's been a memorable week of weather and it's not over just yet.

    For dinner we finished up the soups and stews I made during the past week and I cooked a pot of beans to augment dinner and take us through at least a few days of the upcoming week . . .

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    Mise En Place & Takamura Chromax Gyuto, 210mm
    Jalapenos, serranos, red onion, salt, evoo, Rancho Gordo Christmas Lima Beans, minced garlic, black pepper and bay leaf. I had a bit of time, so I soaked the beans for a couple of hours, then used the soaking water to cook them. As much as I love beans, I generally do not like lima beans but I had these, so I figured I should try them. RG's stuff is always great so, not surprisingly, they were the best lima beans I've ever had. I received them as part of a bean club shipment but I'd buy them again, for sure. They held together nicely but had very tender skins, as well as creamy interiors that were not chalky at all.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With sliced scallion tops and one of the slitted serranos from the pot.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1838 - February 15th, 2021, 8:44 am
    Post #1838 - February 15th, 2021, 8:44 am Post #1838 - February 15th, 2021, 8:44 am
    Recipe inspired by Fuchsia Dunlop's 'Pock-Marked Woman's Bean Curd' but with many changes.
    ImageScallions greens fine sliced, Pixian Sichuan Broad Bean Paste: https://www.amazon.com/Pixian-Sichuan-X ... 317&sr=8-3, Ground Pork with Dark soy sauce and vermouth mixed in, Thin sliced seeded serano, Dried shiitake mushrooms re-hydrated and chopped, chicken stock, fine chopped garlic, red pepper flakes, toasted sesame oil, corn starch slurry, extra firm tofu with a lot of water pressed out, toasted and ground sichuan peppercorns.
    Image In a wok, fry the tofu on high heat, gently flipping until most sides are browned. Then remove tofu from wok.
    ImageFry the pork until mostly cooked. Add chili bean paste, garlic, red pepper flakes, serrano, and a little sesame oil. Cook for a minute or 2.
    Image Add back tofu and add stock. Let simmer for 5 minutes to allow tofu to absorb flavors. Add corn starch slurry and let thicken.
    ImagePlate up and sprinkle Sichuan peppercorns over.
  • Post #1839 - February 15th, 2021, 5:09 pm
    Post #1839 - February 15th, 2021, 5:09 pm Post #1839 - February 15th, 2021, 5:09 pm
    Today,

    I am trying two new dishes that I have never prepared before.

    First, I made up pimento cheese spread. I was rather surprised how simple it was. The only thing that I will do differently the next time is to use blanched red bell pepper in lieu of canned pimentos which is something that I generally do not have in my pantry. I made this more for my neighbor than for us as this is his favorite dish.

    Second, I am cooking a kabocha squash (also known as Japanese pumpkin). While it was tempting to cook it like an acorn squash, I decided to slowly braise it in a dashi, soy sauce, and sugar stock. I was somewhat skeptical about the claim that there was no need to peel the squash. However, that worked very well.
  • Post #1840 - February 15th, 2021, 6:26 pm
    Post #1840 - February 15th, 2021, 6:26 pm Post #1840 - February 15th, 2021, 6:26 pm
    jlawrence01 wrote:First, I made up pimento cheese spread. I was rather surprised how simple it was. The only thing that I will do differently the next time is to use blanched red bell pepper in lieu of canned pimentos which is something that I generally do not have in my pantry. I made this more for my neighbor than for us as this is his favorite dish.

    I highly recommend mincing a little green olive in your pimento cheese. Smoking Goose uses it, and we really liked it; we added some to a recent batch of pimento cheese and indeed it was a game changer.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #1841 - February 15th, 2021, 7:52 pm
    Post #1841 - February 15th, 2021, 7:52 pm Post #1841 - February 15th, 2021, 7:52 pm
    lougord99 wrote:Recipe inspired by Fuchsia Dunlop's 'Pock-Marked Woman's Bean Curd' but with many changes.

    <snip>

    Plate up and sprinkle Sichuan peppercorns over.

    Nice! A very loose riff on mapo? I'm going to have to try this one soon. Did you grind/toast the peppercorns or just sprinkle them whole/raw?

    jlawrence01 wrote:I am trying two new dishes that I have never prepared before.

    First, I made up pimento cheese spread. I was rather surprised how simple it was. The only thing that I will do differently the next time is to use blanched red bell pepper in lieu of canned pimentos which is something that I generally do not have in my pantry. I made this more for my neighbor than for us as this is his favorite dish.

    Second, I am cooking a kabocha squash (also known as Japanese pumpkin). While it was tempting to cook it like an acorn squash, I decided to slowly braise it in a dashi, soy sauce, and sugar stock. I was somewhat skeptical about the claim that there was no need to peel the squash. However, that worked very well.

    I love pimento cheese spread and always find the most laborious part to be grating the cheese. I like to add a splash of worcestershire sauce, a la Pigmon.

    I've been peeling veg less and less frequently. Not just with hard squash but with soft squash, eggplant, carrots, etc. It's often not necessary and not doing so saves time. I also like how certain items taste better and hold together better when cooked if they're not peeled.

    I also tried something today I'd never tried before: a crustless deep dish pizza a la Lou Malnati's. It really is an abomination albeit, a delicious one. But we had some hot Italian sausage (from the grocery store) on hand that was ready to use and sometimes, you just have to follow someone's bliss, even if it's not your own . . . 8)

    Image
    Sauce Mise En Place & Takamura Chromax Gyuto, 210mm
    Minced onion, grated garlic, evoo, crushed San Marzano tomatoes (draining), tomato paste, red chile flakes & dried oregano and dried basil.

    Started with sauteing the onions and spices in evoo, then added the fresh garlic, tomatoes and tomato paste. I ended up adding the drained tomato liquid back because even though it needed to thicken, before that, it needed some additional moisture to complete its simmer.

    Image
    Sausage Base
    Spicy Italian sausage from the grocery store, removed from its casings and smashed into a 9" cake pan. All your base are belong to us! :lol:

    Image
    Mise En Place & Takamura Chromax Gyuto, 210mm
    Pepperoni, grated mozzarella, sauce, Grana Padano and sausage base.

    Assembly . . .

    Image
    Cheese

    Image
    Saucing
    Gotta love the baby offset. :)

    Image
    Sauced
    Decided to sneak in some pulverized parmesan/romano blend, too.

    Image
    Pepperoni
    And a bit more of the pulverized blend.

    Image
    Assembled
    Just a bit of Grana Padano grated over the top before it hit the oven, 425F for ~40 minutes.

    Image
    Baked
    After it baked, I let it rest for about 10 minutes, hoping it would set up . . .

    Image
    Plated Up
    . . . but it was still a fairly gooey mess. Delicious, though. Maybe I should have baked it another 5 minutes, let it rest another 5 minutes or both.

    Image
    Salad
    Mixed greens, arugula, baby tomatoes and homemade buttermilk vinaigrette.

    Happy Monday! :)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1842 - February 15th, 2021, 9:20 pm
    Post #1842 - February 15th, 2021, 9:20 pm Post #1842 - February 15th, 2021, 9:20 pm
    I wonder if it would help to blast the sausage in the pan for a few minutes to form a crust on the bottom before adding the rest of the toppings (and avoid the steaming that might result from the tomatoes).
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #1843 - February 15th, 2021, 9:36 pm
    Post #1843 - February 15th, 2021, 9:36 pm Post #1843 - February 15th, 2021, 9:36 pm
    Homemade hot chocolate w/whipped cream and a dash of amaretto. Snow what snow?

    click to enlarge
    Image

    Hot Chocolate, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1844 - February 15th, 2021, 9:42 pm
    Post #1844 - February 15th, 2021, 9:42 pm Post #1844 - February 15th, 2021, 9:42 pm
    I would be tempted to make crustless pizza in an ovenproof skillet. Pack the sausage into the pan, brown it lightly on one side, carefully turn it over, brown the other side a little, pour off most of the grease, then assemble and bake long enough to melt the cheese and brown the top. But that's even less like pizza.
  • Post #1845 - February 15th, 2021, 9:51 pm
    Post #1845 - February 15th, 2021, 9:51 pm Post #1845 - February 15th, 2021, 9:51 pm
    boudreaulicious wrote:I wonder if it would help to blast the sausage in the pan for a few minutes to form a crust on the bottom before adding the rest of the toppings (and avoid the steaming that might result from the tomatoes).

    I think it was mainly a matter of good, old-fashioned overload. I just put too much of everything on there, especially the tomatoes because, well, that's my favorite part. But it was all cooked correctly. The sausage had a nice crust and was cooked through. Cooking the cheese more might have made it less gooey but I guess I shouldn't really be shooting for seized up cheese. And I could have let it sit for longer but the prospect of eating it cold isn't appealing, either. I thought of forming more of a lip around the edge of the sausage disc. Maybe that would have helped contain the innards.

    Also, thinking about how Lou's delivers these, it seems they might be baked on a bed of foil that's buttressed around the circumference of the sausage disk. That "open" baking method -- and the fact that they're much more sparsely topped -- might explain the differences. I'd say I might make some adjustments next time but I really don't anticipate there being a next time . . . but you never know. :roll:

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1846 - February 15th, 2021, 9:57 pm
    Post #1846 - February 15th, 2021, 9:57 pm Post #1846 - February 15th, 2021, 9:57 pm
    tjr wrote:I would be tempted to make crustless pizza in an ovenproof skillet. Pack the sausage into the pan, brown it lightly on one side, carefully turn it over, brown the other side a little, pour off most of the grease, then assemble and bake long enough to melt the cheese and brown the top. But that's even less like pizza.

    I know, right? Deep dish is already not exactly pizza. Crustless takes it even farther away from being pizza and flipping that sausage patty around just about puts it in another area code. But I did think about all the rendered fat with nowhere to go and decided to just look the other way this time. Ironic because when I order a deep dish from Lou's, I always ask for sausage pieces, instead of the 'full coverage' they serve by default. However, when the sausage forms the actual base of your pizza, there's not much you can do about that.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1847 - February 15th, 2021, 10:00 pm
    Post #1847 - February 15th, 2021, 10:00 pm Post #1847 - February 15th, 2021, 10:00 pm
    G Wiv wrote:Hot Chocolate, count me a Fan!

    Nice . . . 1:1 ratio, I assume? :P

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1848 - February 16th, 2021, 6:04 am
    Post #1848 - February 16th, 2021, 6:04 am Post #1848 - February 16th, 2021, 6:04 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    lougord99 wrote:Recipe inspired by Fuchsia Dunlop's 'Pock-Marked Woman's Bean Curd' but with many changes.

    <snip>

    Plate up and sprinkle Sichuan peppercorns over.

    Nice! A very loose riff on mapo? I'm going to have to try this one soon. Did you grind/toast the peppercorns or just sprinkle them whole/raw?
    =R=

    Toasted in a dry pan and ground in a mortar.
  • Post #1849 - February 16th, 2021, 1:22 pm
    Post #1849 - February 16th, 2021, 1:22 pm Post #1849 - February 16th, 2021, 1:22 pm
    Thanks for this one G Wiv. Just finishing lunch at my desk, took a big sip of my grapefruit water and read the following. Luckily, my keyboard still works...

    G Wiv wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Browned the sausage balls

    Soup looks terrific and, I might add, your balls are wonderfully symmetrical.


    Next quote?
  • Post #1850 - February 16th, 2021, 7:37 pm
    Post #1850 - February 16th, 2021, 7:37 pm Post #1850 - February 16th, 2021, 7:37 pm
    janeyb wrote:
    G Wiv wrote:Soup looks terrific and, I might add, your balls are wonderfully symmetrical.

    Next quote?

    Done! :D

    Nice and easy dinner tonight . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Anryu Kurouchi Damascus Gyuto, 210mm
    Shallots, garlic, sliced shiitake caps & minced stems, black pepper, spinach, salt and sliced creminis.

    Image
    Sauteed Mushrooms & Spinach
    Garnished with fresh chives.

    Image
    Boneless Rib Roast
    This is about half of a 7+ pound roast I got from Costco. I trussed up this half for tonight, and the other half is sealed up and in the freezer for future use. I love rib roast but it doesn't make great leftovers because it's fatty and doesn't reheat well, so I didn't want to cook the whole thing at once.

    Image
    Roasted
    About 2.5 hours baked @ 200F, followed by 6 minutes convection roasted @450F.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Boneless rib roast, sauteed mushrooms & spinach and some re-roasted cauliflower that was leftover from a carry-out dinner last week. The roast was cooked nicely and plenty moist but not overly flavorful. I broke out some horseradish sauce moments after I snapped this pic.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1851 - February 17th, 2021, 8:10 pm
    Post #1851 - February 17th, 2021, 8:10 pm Post #1851 - February 17th, 2021, 8:10 pm
    Well, I had a jar of garlic black bean sauce that's been around for awhile, and some ground pork, and a package of lo mein noodles -- and thus a janky asian "bolognese" was born. Sweated a diced onion and a bunch of ginger, quickly marinated the meat in a mix of shaoxing, soy, sesame oil, sugar, browned the meat after the onions were translucent, made a little mixture of the garlic black bean sauce with tomato paste, more sesame oil, and a teensy bit of black vinegar; added the sauce to the browned meat, tossed with noodles and a little pasta water. Topped with scallions and basil. Side of snap peas. It was pretty successful. Maybe next time I'd add some carrot or mushroom all finely diced.
  • Post #1852 - February 17th, 2021, 10:13 pm
    Post #1852 - February 17th, 2021, 10:13 pm Post #1852 - February 17th, 2021, 10:13 pm
    Brown the onions more, go heavy on the sauce and you'd be at jjajang myeon (aka chappaghetti)
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #1853 - February 17th, 2021, 11:42 pm
    Post #1853 - February 17th, 2021, 11:42 pm Post #1853 - February 17th, 2021, 11:42 pm
    annak wrote: -- and thus a janky asian "bolognese" was born.

    LOL - that's hysterical. And it sounds really good, too. And I'm guessing it felt good to use up all those items, too. I just got a new wok and I really want to start breaking it in. Something free-form like this is exactly what I need to do to get rolling. On the nights I don't cook, I get downright antsy, and reading posts like this just make me miss it even more. :)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1854 - February 18th, 2021, 6:44 am
    Post #1854 - February 18th, 2021, 6:44 am Post #1854 - February 18th, 2021, 6:44 am
    Fried fish with spicy topping.
    ImageRough chopped garlic, jalapeno, shallots, fresh mint, lime leaves, fish sauce and Golden Mountain sauce.
    ImageMinimally process in mini food processor garlic, jalapeno, and shallots with 1/4 cup water to small pieces.
    ImageSimmer in a pan with sugar, salt, lime leaves 1 TBSP fish sauce and 3 TBSP Golden Mountain sauce for 20-30 minutes until thick.
    ImageDredge Tilapia with rice flour and fry on high heat until brown on both sides.
    Image Spoon mixture over fish, leaving behind the lime leaves and top with mint leaves
  • Post #1855 - February 18th, 2021, 7:45 pm
    Post #1855 - February 18th, 2021, 7:45 pm Post #1855 - February 18th, 2021, 7:45 pm
    lougord99 wrote:Fried fish with spicy topping.

    Wow, that looks great. Have you tried it with other types of fish, too?

    For us, after a too-long interval, it was back to curry tonight. Combination of pantry raid and getting RID of some stuff . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Yu Kurosaki Fujin VG10 Petty, 150mm
    Everything except the chicken thigh meat. Leftover melted leeks, Penzey's Bangkok blend, mung bean sprouts, 4x homemade chicken stock, Thai bird chiles, coconut milk, bamboo shoots, Maesri red curry paste, gapi, fish sauce, basil leaves and zucchini.

    I've had that Bangkok blend (sweet peppers, garlic, ginger, black pepper, galangal, hot peppers, lemon grass, basil and cilantro) for a while and can never figure out what to do with it, so I decided to sprinkle some into the mix. It added some nice notes but I still feel like there are better uses for it . . . maybe some grilled or broiled proteins.

    Image
    Broccoli Rabe Mise En Place
    Slivered garlic, salt, black pepper, broccoli rabe, evoo and red chile flakes. Just a quick saute into a steam.

    Image
    Sauteed Broccoli Rabe
    Once the 30ml of water evaporated, it was ready.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With jasmine rice.

    I took last night off from cooking dinner, yet it felt like an eternity since I'd cooked. I was glad to be back over the wok tonight.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1856 - February 19th, 2021, 1:09 pm
    Post #1856 - February 19th, 2021, 1:09 pm Post #1856 - February 19th, 2021, 1:09 pm
    This is barely even a recipe, but it uses pantry staples and it's very good. There are exactly two ingredients:
    Image
    Canned sardines in oil, and unagi sauce. You can also easily make unagi sauce by simmering together sake, mirin, soy sauce and sugar until it thickens.

    Drain the oil, brush on the sauce, and broil in the toaster oven for 5-6 min, brushing a couple more times to build up a crispy glaze, and you get:
    Image
    Sardine "unagi"! Sardines have a dense, meaty texture that reminds me of real unagi, and they taste great with the sauce. Top with sesame seeds and scallions and serve over a rice bowl.
  • Post #1857 - February 19th, 2021, 3:19 pm
    Post #1857 - February 19th, 2021, 3:19 pm Post #1857 - February 19th, 2021, 3:19 pm
    I assume Unagi is readily obtained at Mitsuwa. I'm in.
  • Post #1858 - February 19th, 2021, 3:41 pm
    Post #1858 - February 19th, 2021, 3:41 pm Post #1858 - February 19th, 2021, 3:41 pm
    just popped a dutch oven full of baby back ribs into a 350 for the next few hours. this oven method is from David Lebovitz, of Chez Panisse fame, and we like it very well (even though we also do ribs on the big green egg etc). his instructions involve cooking a caramel in the dutch oven, adding beer and bourbon and soy and some other good stuff, tossing the ribs in it, and baking.

    also made some corn muffins (a nice smitten technique where you cook a little porridge of cornmeal and milk and add it to the rest of the batter; comes out super moist). and there will be salad.

    happy friday all!
  • Post #1859 - February 19th, 2021, 7:17 pm
    Post #1859 - February 19th, 2021, 7:17 pm Post #1859 - February 19th, 2021, 7:17 pm
    eating while walking wrote:Canned sardines in oil, and unagi sauce.

    Um, yeah. Sign me up for that! :) As Lou asked, where do you get those items?

    annak wrote:just popped a dutch oven full of baby back ribs into a 350 for the next few hours. this oven method is from David Lebovitz, of Chez Panisse fame, and we like it very well (even though we also do ribs on the big green egg etc). his instructions involve cooking a caramel in the dutch oven, adding beer and bourbon and soy and some other good stuff, tossing the ribs in it, and baking.

    also made some corn muffins (a nice smitten technique where you cook a little porridge of cornmeal and milk and add it to the rest of the batter; comes out super moist). and there will be salad.

    happy friday all!

    Sounds like a nice combo. I can't believe you're not in the mood to dig out the BGE right now! :D

    Two great things about having a garage hovering at 32-35F are that it provides unlimited food storage, and that the food stored there lasts a long time without having to be thawed before use. However, that may have disappointed my family, who had their sights set on ordering out tonight . . . until I found some perfectly good chicken thighs, purchased ~10 days ago, on a shelf next to my power drill! :D

    Image
    Mise En Place & Konosuke Fujiyama FM Blue #2 Gyuto, 210mm
    Salt, black pepper, red & green bell peppers, cream, white wine, evoo, onion/thyme/bay leaves, wine soaked chicken thighs, slivered garlic, tomato paste, white (maybe yellow?) carrot and celery.

    Image
    Sear
    Dried, seasoned with s&p and tossed into a very hot pan with a bit of evoo. They practically jumped after hitting the pan, and browned up right after that, creating a beautiful, golden-brown fond. After that, I removed the thighs, and tossed in the mirepoix to release the fond, followed by the garlic, the soaking wine, the bell peppers and everything else, including the seared thighs. Simmered it all covered for about 45 minutes until the chicken was done, removed the bird and reduced the rest of until it was nicely thick.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Chicken thighs, wine-tomato-cream sauce with Mrs. Suburban's world-renowned oven-roasted broccoli. :D

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1860 - February 20th, 2021, 8:43 am
    Post #1860 - February 20th, 2021, 8:43 am Post #1860 - February 20th, 2021, 8:43 am
    Image
    https://hot-thai-kitchen.com/pork-dumpl ... o-tutorial

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