LTH Home

Corona cuisine / Social distancing cooking

Corona cuisine / Social distancing cooking
  • Forum HomePost Reply BackTop
    Page 65 of 69
  • Post #1921 - March 5th, 2021, 11:02 am
    Post #1921 - March 5th, 2021, 11:02 am Post #1921 - March 5th, 2021, 11:02 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote: Tenderloins were about 135F internal at that point. They carried over quite a bit, to about 148F, but were still moist and tender.

    =R=

    I'm surprised they rose that much. That aren't that thick or dense. I wouldn't have guessed more than 5 or 6 degrees.
  • Post #1922 - March 5th, 2021, 12:08 pm
    Post #1922 - March 5th, 2021, 12:08 pm Post #1922 - March 5th, 2021, 12:08 pm
    We received a couple of de-boned stuffed chickens from Hubert's in Maurice, LA . Tasty, though very rich rice stuffing, broccoli/cheese. Lot of good looking items on the web site, I've heard of them before in reference to boudin. Link

    clicke to enlarge
    Image

    Chicken, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1923 - March 5th, 2021, 12:14 pm
    Post #1923 - March 5th, 2021, 12:14 pm Post #1923 - March 5th, 2021, 12:14 pm
    lougord99 wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote: Tenderloins were about 135F internal at that point. They carried over quite a bit, to about 148F, but were still moist and tender.

    =R=

    I'm surprised they rose that much. That aren't that thick or dense. I wouldn't have guessed more than 5 or 6 degrees.

    I think it might have been a function of the higher oven temperature but yes, I was surprised, too.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1924 - March 5th, 2021, 8:52 pm
    Post #1924 - March 5th, 2021, 8:52 pm Post #1924 - March 5th, 2021, 8:52 pm
    Birthday cake tonight. The birthday cake I always make:Image
    Everyone here really wants French silk pie, but it seems wrong to have birthday pie. So, I invented this cross between cake and French silk pie. The sides always look a little ugly but it usually gets eaten too fast for criticism.
  • Post #1925 - March 5th, 2021, 10:13 pm
    Post #1925 - March 5th, 2021, 10:13 pm Post #1925 - March 5th, 2021, 10:13 pm
    tjr wrote:Birthday cake tonight. The birthday cake I always make:Image
    Everyone here really wants French silk pie, but it seems wrong to have birthday pie. So, I invented this cross between cake and French silk pie. The sides always look a little ugly but it usually gets eaten too fast for criticism.


    That looks crazy delicious—I love French Silk pie. Recipe?
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #1926 - March 6th, 2021, 1:20 am
    Post #1926 - March 6th, 2021, 1:20 am Post #1926 - March 6th, 2021, 1:20 am
    Here goes:
    Preheat oven to 350F.
    Grease bottom and sides of an 8"x3" springform pan, then dust with cocoa powder.
    Mix
    1 1/4 c cake flour
    2/3 c sugar
    1/4 c Dutch process cocoa
    1 tsp baking soda
    1/2 tsp baking powder
    1/4 tsp salt
    In a separate bowl, beat until smooth
    1/2 c + 2 Tbsp milk
    1 tsp vinegar
    3 Tbsp vegetable oil
    1/2 tsp vanilla
    1 egg
    Add dry ingredients, stir to mix, then beat for 1 minute. Pour batter into springform pan. Bake 30 minutes or until done when tested with cake tester.
    Cool. Remove sides of springform pan, leaving cake on bottom of pan. Wash and dry the springform sides.
    If necessary, trim top of cake to 1 1/2 " height.
    Cut a strip of parchment paper 4" wide long enough to go around the cake with at least 1/2" overlap. Grease both sides of the parchment. Wrap it tightly around the cake, then put the sides back on the pan. Smooth the upper part of the parchment into a tight fit in the pan.
    Prepare the filling:
    Melt
    1 100 g bar of 70% or more cocoa content chocolate.
    Cool until it is almost starting to solidify.
    Cream
    3/4 c (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter
    1 1/4 c sugar (I use C&H Baking Sugar, a finer grind)
    generous dash salt
    until very light, scraping the bowl a few times. (I
    used a stand mixer with whisk attachment and beat for 5 minutes.)
    Mix in the chocolate mixer and beat until very light and fluffy. Beat in
    1 tsp vanilla
    then beat in, one at a time
    3 pasteurized eggs
    Beat until soft peaks form. Be careful not to overbeat and make the filling runny.
    Scoop filling into prepared pan. Smooth top. Chill for several hours.
    Before serving, remove springform sides and carefully peel off the parchment.

    Other cakes can be substituted for the cake above. Use enough batter for 1/2 a layer, or 1/2 recipe brownies.
  • Post #1927 - March 6th, 2021, 7:51 am
    Post #1927 - March 6th, 2021, 7:51 am Post #1927 - March 6th, 2021, 7:51 am
    tjr wrote:Here goes:
    Preheat oven to 350F.
    Grease bottom and sides of an 8"x3" springform pan, then dust with cocoa powder.
    Mix
    1 1/4 c cake flour
    2/3 c sugar
    1/4 c Dutch process cocoa
    1 tsp baking soda
    1/2 tsp baking powder
    1/4 tsp salt
    In a separate bowl, beat until smooth
    1/2 c + 2 Tbsp milk
    1 tsp vinegar
    3 Tbsp vegetable oil
    1/2 tsp vanilla
    1 egg
    Add dry ingredients, stir to mix, then beat for 1 minute. Pour batter into springform pan. Bake 30 minutes or until done when tested with cake tester.
    Cool. Remove sides of springform pan, leaving cake on bottom of pan. Wash and dry the springform sides.
    If necessary, trim top of cake to 1 1/2 " height.
    Cut a strip of parchment paper 4" wide long enough to go around the cake with at least 1/2" overlap. Grease both sides of the parchment. Wrap it tightly around the cake, then put the sides back on the pan. Smooth the upper part of the parchment into a tight fit in the pan.
    Prepare the filling:
    Melt
    1 100 g bar of 70% or more cocoa content chocolate.
    Cool until it is almost starting to solidify.
    Cream
    3/4 c (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter
    1 1/4 c sugar (I use C&H Baking Sugar, a finer grind)
    generous dash salt
    until very light, scraping the bowl a few times. (I
    used a stand mixer with whisk attachment and beat for 5 minutes.)
    Mix in the chocolate mixer and beat until very light and fluffy. Beat in
    1 tsp vanilla
    then beat in, one at a time
    3 pasteurized eggs
    Beat until soft peaks form. Be careful not to overbeat and make the filling runny.
    Scoop filling into prepared pan. Smooth top. Chill for several hours.
    Before serving, remove springform sides and carefully peel off the parchment.

    Other cakes can be substituted for the cake above. Use enough batter for 1/2 a layer, or 1/2 recipe brownies.


    Thank you! Stepson #1 is a chocolate fan —going to give this a go for his bday dinner tomorrow. Never been much of a baker so cross your fingers for me!
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #1928 - March 6th, 2021, 9:27 am
    Post #1928 - March 6th, 2021, 9:27 am Post #1928 - March 6th, 2021, 9:27 am
    boudreaulicious wrote:cross your fingers for me!

    Fingers crossed!

    If you're not comfortable making cake, a half box of brownie mix works just fine. Either divide all the ingredients or bake the other half for an extra treat. On the other hand, this type of oil-based cake is easier to make than a traditional butter cake.

    And be sure the cake is fully cooled before adding the filling. I usually bake the night before, then mix the filling in the morning so it has plenty of time to set.
  • Post #1929 - March 6th, 2021, 7:23 pm
    Post #1929 - March 6th, 2021, 7:23 pm Post #1929 - March 6th, 2021, 7:23 pm
    One more pass at what has become a coronatime household favorite: baked rotini. Before the main, quick prep for a shallot vinaigrette . . .

    Image
    Shallots & Anryu Blue #2 Hammered Petty 130mm
    I think I could have fun mincing shallots all day with this little guy.

    Image
    Salad
    The usual: spring mix, arugula, baby tomatoes. Shallot vinaigrette was very nice.

    Image
    Baked Rotini
    The most labor-intensive part of this dish is the clean-up because it uses quite a few large pieces that cannot all go in the dishwasher together, so they need to be washed by hand (6-qt rondeau, stock pot, gigantic stainless mixing bowl).

    Image
    Plated Up
    Garnished with freshly grated cheese blend (pecorino romano, grana padano, parmesan), scallion tops and flat-leaf parsley leaves. Such a comforting dish. Gotta give a tip of the cap to Chef John, whose video inspired me to make this for the first time, a few months ago. I've tweaked his recipe in a few ways since then but the overall scheme is solid.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1930 - March 7th, 2021, 1:54 am
    Post #1930 - March 7th, 2021, 1:54 am Post #1930 - March 7th, 2021, 1:54 am
    Home made egg fu young. Little sloppy on construction but tasty. The bride gave it a thumbs up!

    click to enlarge
    Image

    Egg fu young, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1931 - March 7th, 2021, 12:05 pm
    Post #1931 - March 7th, 2021, 12:05 pm Post #1931 - March 7th, 2021, 12:05 pm
    G Wiv wrote:Egg fu young, count me a Fan!

    Damn, me too! Looks great.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1932 - March 7th, 2021, 7:33 pm
    Post #1932 - March 7th, 2021, 7:33 pm Post #1932 - March 7th, 2021, 7:33 pm
    As a thank you for sharpening some of his knives, my cousin brought me a spatchcock+ chicken from his favorite local market. I say spatchcock+ because not only was it splayed flat and fully seasoned but the only bones left in it were the wing bones. :shock: Even though this is not my sort of thing, it was a very nice gesture of him. And we didn't have much choice but to cook it up for dinner.

    But this struck me as a really odd way to sell a chicken because it doesn't seem like an optimal head start for a novice (who else would desire such a heavily prefabbed bird?) since, with the bones removed, it's destined to cook unevenly. And yet, no moderately experienced cook would pay extra for -- or even desire -- such unnecessary preparation.

    The packaging called for baking it at 350F for 60-75 minutes, which would, I think, have left it somewhere between doorstop and desiccation. Instead, I opted for my usual method, indirect over lump charcoal for 25-30 minutes or until my thermapen told me it was done. Before it hit the grill, there was a bit of side dish prep . . .

    Image
    Green Bean Mise En Place & Shun Damascus Paring Knife, 120mm
    Crushed garlic, toasted sesame oil, dark soy, green beans, fermented soybean sauce, fermented broad bean paste, 4x chicken stock, oyster sauce and peanut oil. The only thing I used the knife for was trimming the beans. Just a little bit of each of these ingredients to avoid salt overload, and held back the few drops of sesame oil until it came off the heat.

    Image
    Tender-Crisp Green Beans
    These turned out really well. A quick sear in the peanut oil, then added the garlic, then all the liquids except for the sesame oil. Let it simmer until beans were slightly tender and the sauce had thickened. After that, as I mentioned above, removed it from the heat and added the sesame oil and gave them a toss.

    Now, on to that bird . . .

    Image
    Spatchcock+ Chicken
    There was nothing connecting the airline breasts to the thighs except for some skin, so for all intents and purposes, they didn't need to be connected, and there was no benefit to them being so. I moved this around a few times on the grates, trying to keep it cooking evenly but despite my best efforts, by the time the breast meat was a mere 150F, the thighs were already 190F. :(

    Image
    Plated Up
    Charcoal grilled chicken with tender-crisp green beans and a Day-One serving of the weekly coleslaw.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1933 - March 8th, 2021, 7:38 pm
    Post #1933 - March 8th, 2021, 7:38 pm Post #1933 - March 8th, 2021, 7:38 pm
    been cooking as ever put nothing super inspired - burgers, braised pork shoulder tacos, homemade pizzas, seared salmon. tonight we did a one pot meal from NYT - shrimp scampi with orzo. toast the orzo in butter and garlic and add some wine and stock (made shrimp shells if you're on it), then at the last minute throw shrimp on top to steam (that you've marinated in chili flake, garlic, and lemon zest). then top with fresh herbs and lemon juice. it was quick and had that concentrated starch silky effect of one pot pastas, so we enjoyed. served with green beans and burrata and kiwis for fruit. tomorrow we'll take advantage of the warm weather again (snow on the deck melted!) to grill double cut pork chops dry brined in the afternoon.
  • Post #1934 - March 8th, 2021, 8:04 pm
    Post #1934 - March 8th, 2021, 8:04 pm Post #1934 - March 8th, 2021, 8:04 pm
    annak wrote:tonight we did a one pot meal from NYT - shrimp scampi with orzo.

    Being a seafood-focused one pot meal, I think our meal tonight and yours were distant cousins. I tried something Jazzfood told me about; something he learned when he was cooking at an izakaya in Japan: koji-marinated scallops. This started about two weeks ago, when I started fermenting the koji . . .

    Image
    Koji & Salt
    Koji container and measured-out amounts of the koji and additive-free kosher salt.

    Image
    Koji
    A closer look at the grains.

    Image
    Koji, Salt & Water
    This was the start of the fermentation. I planned on taking some pictures along the way but its appearance didn't change very much over the two weeks. I shook it up every day, remembering to seal the lid before and loosen the lid after. :wink: It got a bit milkier but that was about the only change I could see.

    Flash forward about two weeks and it was time to use the koji fermentation, which had become a bit sweet and slightly tangy. Per Jazzfood, all that would be needed was a brief marination. I let them go about 30 minutes.

    Image
    Mise En Place & Konosuke SKD Tsuchime Gyuto, 240 mm
    Crushed garlic, shallots, mini tomatoes, mirin, shoyu, spinach, rice vinegar, peanut oil and koji-marinated scallops (pre-rinse and dry).

    This combination worked out pretty well. The scallops, koji and mirin were pretty sweet. The tomatoes were awful but I knew this going in, and their one-note-acidity balanced out the sweetness of the other ingredients pretty well.

    Image
    On The Platter
    Garnished with togarashi.

    Happy Monday! :)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1935 - March 9th, 2021, 7:59 pm
    Post #1935 - March 9th, 2021, 7:59 pm Post #1935 - March 9th, 2021, 7:59 pm
    Got my hands on some nice, dried Aleppo pepper flakes and wanted to put them to use. Many (internet) roads led back to this preparation, which was basically a yogurt-based marinade, followed by grilling over charcoal. Familiar territory for sure. One of my go-to recipes is pretty similar, the main differences being instead of Aleppo pepper, it uses turmeric and coriander seed. In any case, this seemed like a can't-lose configuration . . .

    Image
    Marinade Mise En Place & Moritaka AS Gyuto, 210 mm
    Smashed garlic cloves, lemon wheels, red wine vinegar, Aleppo pepper flakes (& splash of water), evoo, tomato paste, 2% yogurt, black pepper and salt. Most recipes I found called for whole fat yogurt but I generally like 2% better because it's tangier, so that's what I used. I mixed all these together and poured them over some chicken thighs (of course :wink:) in a zipper baggie. I let it marinate overnight, squishing it around a few times during the soak.

    Decided to get RID of a couple of eggplants, too. Not quite baba ganoush but a decent, oven-roasted bastardization . . .

    Image
    Eggplant Mise En Place & Moritaka AS Gyuto, 210 mm
    Crushed garlic, parsley leaves, tomatoes, evoo, oven-roasted eggplants, tahina, lemon (later juiced) and ground sumac.

    Image
    Eggplant Pulp
    After roasting and cooling, with the skins removed, slightly drained. I tried to retain some of the liquid (lots of flavor there) without making the final dish too watery.

    Image
    Roasted Eggplant
    Garnished with evoo, parsley leaves and ground sumac.

    Back to the chicken . . .

    Image
    Grilling
    Cooking now for week-long leftovers, so that was a full grill. In the end, they took about 30 minutes on the indirect side.

    Image
    Platter
    I thought this was a nice output, especially considering I managed to repair our fence gate while they grilled. :)

    Image
    Plated Up
    Aleppo pepper grilled chicken and roasted eggplant. Really nice, distinctive flavor and very little heat. The Aleppo is faintly smoky and a bit tangy. I ended up sprinkling a little more of it over my pieces after they grilled.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1936 - March 10th, 2021, 3:42 am
    Post #1936 - March 10th, 2021, 3:42 am Post #1936 - March 10th, 2021, 3:42 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:I thought this was a nice output, especially considering I managed to repair our fence gate while they grilled. :)

    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1937 - March 10th, 2021, 7:22 pm
    Post #1937 - March 10th, 2021, 7:22 pm Post #1937 - March 10th, 2021, 7:22 pm
    G Wiv wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:I thought this was a nice output, especially considering I managed to repair our fence gate while they grilled. :)


    LMAO - love it! No one in this world -- least of all, my family -- is going to argue that that should be my theme song. :lol: :D

    Quick Wednesday, after-work dinner prep, mining the freezer and the pantry to come up with a tasty main course. Before that, there was zucchini, which has become the chicken thigh of vegetables in our house . . .

    Image
    Zucchini Mise En Place & Kohetsu Blue #2 Addict, 240mm
    Not much new to see here and I never even got a shot of the finished saute but I wanted to show off a shot of the knife because I love that beefy boy more and more each time I use it.

    For the main, I dug the last bag of wild-caught Alaskan spot prawns with roe out of the freezer and figured nothing could be easier or more delicious than another round of Pascal's Manale-style BBQ shrimp . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place
    Spot prawns (they almost look cooked but they were raw and the red was from the roe), white wine, worcestershire sauce, hot sauce, spice mix (black pepper, cayenne pepper, paprika, salt, thyme, oregano, basil), obliterated garlic and unsalted butter of varying vintages.

    Image
    Plated Up
    BBQ Shrimp, garnished with parsley leaves, chives and some of the spice mix. This is, hands down, one of the best freezer+pantry dishes there is. Was thinking that other than the shrimp, we always have all the other ingredients in the house. It's definitely not bbq (possibly the ultimate misnomer) but it is an iconic and delicious classic.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1938 - March 11th, 2021, 7:56 am
    Post #1938 - March 11th, 2021, 7:56 am Post #1938 - March 11th, 2021, 7:56 am
    ronnie_suburban wrote:BBQ Shrimp
    Did you actually toss the shrimp on the barbie or were they sauteed?
  • Post #1939 - March 11th, 2021, 10:04 am
    Post #1939 - March 11th, 2021, 10:04 am Post #1939 - March 11th, 2021, 10:04 am
    tjr wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:BBQ Shrimp
    Did you actually toss the shrimp on the barbie or were they sauteed?

    No, sir. That's not how this one is done. This is an internet-derived recreation of the iconic dish from Pascal's Manale in NOLA. I made this late last year and documented the process more completely in this post.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1940 - March 11th, 2021, 7:55 pm
    Post #1940 - March 11th, 2021, 7:55 pm Post #1940 - March 11th, 2021, 7:55 pm
    Sausage Fest @ Chez Suburban! :D

    But first, a quick condiment . . .

    Image
    Pepper/Onion Mise En Place & Harukaze G3 Nashiji Gyuto 240mm
    Crushed garlic, onion, salt, black pepper, dried oregano, evoo*, white vinegar, white wine and bell peppers. Just a quick saute into a simmer until everything was tender but not mushy. *This is yet another bottle of Pao Gasol-branded vintage varietal (picual) Spanish olive oil from the depths of my basement. 10 years old but smelled and tasted terrific. Again, I normally wouldn't apply heat to such an oil but now it's open and I just want to move it before it goes bad.

    Image
    Peppers & Onions
    Finished and waiting for the rest of our dinner to be ready.

    Image
    Sausages
    I picked up the Hot Italian sausage today from Poeta's in Highwood. The skinless hot dogs (front) and the Jalapeno-Sriracha Chicken Sausage (back, left) were both items that were delivered to us in error early in the pandemic that had been occupying space in our freezer for quite some time. I lightly scored all of the cured links. It was a pleasure to finally get them out of the freezer and grill them up! :)

    Image
    Salad
    Groundhog Day special . . . spring mix, arugula, mini tomatoes. There was a miso-tahini vinaigrette, too.

    Image
    Sausages
    Charcoal-grilled for about 10 minutes, mostly on the indirect side.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Hot Italian sausage, peppers & onions, Mrs. Suburban's notorious roasted cauliflower, hot giardiniera and Dusseldorf mustard.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1941 - March 11th, 2021, 10:29 pm
    Post #1941 - March 11th, 2021, 10:29 pm Post #1941 - March 11th, 2021, 10:29 pm
    Made an NYT recipe tonight for Fish Stew with coconut milk and vinegar. It has basil, shallot, lemongrass, lime zest, and comes together fast. Used those nicely packaged frozen cod filets from whole foods that have been a real favorite in pandemic times. And we threw in the baby bok choi that I had been planning as separate side. Served over rice with optional furikake and kimchi, and cucumber quick pickles. Good!
  • Post #1942 - March 12th, 2021, 9:26 pm
    Post #1942 - March 12th, 2021, 9:26 pm Post #1942 - March 12th, 2021, 9:26 pm
    Fresh walleye pike from Captain Alex Seafood, rice, asparagus =dinner.

    click to enlarge
    Image
    Image

    Walleye pike, count me a Fan!

    Captain Alex
    8874 N Milwaukee Ave
    Niles, Illinois 60714
    847-803-8833
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1943 - March 13th, 2021, 7:20 pm
    Post #1943 - March 13th, 2021, 7:20 pm Post #1943 - March 13th, 2021, 7:20 pm
    this afternoon was "back on my bullish*t," as the twitters say: braised pork shoulder. i salted and seared, removed from the dutch oven, then sautéed 2 fennel bulbs and a large onion; added several garlic cloves; 2 tbsp of tomato paste caramelized a bit in center of pot; 1 c white wine, 2 c chicken stock; 2 cups of castel vetrano olives and 2 navel oranges supremed (zested first, set aside). then low oven for a few hours until falling apart. served over creamy polenta (serious eats technique, really works and so light!) with a gremolata of the orange zest and fennel fronds. arugula salad on the side. it was good.

    hope everyone did ok with the heaviness of the one year anniversary. hope is coming!
  • Post #1944 - March 13th, 2021, 8:52 pm
    Post #1944 - March 13th, 2021, 8:52 pm Post #1944 - March 13th, 2021, 8:52 pm
    annak wrote:Made an NYT recipe tonight for Fish Stew with coconut milk and vinegar . . .

    This sounds great -- and nice to incorporate the bok choy without having to make an entirely separate dish.

    G Wiv wrote:Walleye pike, count me a Fan!

    Nice. What was the coating and what's that pan? That's a nice looking unit.

    annak wrote:this afternoon was "back on my bullish*t," as the twitters say: braised pork shoulder.

    LOL - never heard that one before, of course I don't twitter, either. 8)

    annak wrote:hope everyone did ok with the heaviness of the one year anniversary. hope is coming!

    Getting there . . .

    It's funny how easily swayed I am. I guess a year of trying to come up with interesting meal plans will do that. Most recently, the fact that I found a source for fresh wasabi root drove my entire dinner plan. So, welcome to Amateur Hour! :D It started out easily enough, with goma-ae, which I've made successfully in the past . . .

    Image
    Goma-ae Mise En Place
    Toasted and mashed sesame seeds, shoyu, mirin, sake and granulated sugar. I've actually gotten pretty good with that mortar and pestle over the past year.

    Image
    Goma-ae Dressing
    Much smoother than last time. Groundhog Day! :D

    Image
    Goma-Ae
    Kind of looks like it exploded but it tasted great.

    Next, it was on to the main event . . .

    Image
    Wasabi Root & Kuwabara White #2 Tall Petty 115mm
    It was very nice of the wasabi seller to throw in the mini grater. The wasabi was actually pristine when it arrived a couple of days ago. It had darkened a bit on the exterior so I used the mighty-mini Kuwabara to trim it before grating.

    Next up, more main course components . . .

    Image
    Spicy Mayo Mise En Place
    Togarashi, toasted sesame oil, sriracha and kewpie mayonnaise. I like this Thai sriracha a lot more than the Huy Fong because it's hotter and less sweet.

    Image
    Rice
    Three cups of rice cooker'd Shirakiku Yuki No Kakera short grain rice, drizzled with homemade seasoned vinegar (rice vinegar, granulated sugar, salt).

    Image
    Spicy Tuna Roll Mise En Place & Konosuke Fujiyama Blue #2 Sujihiki, 270mm
    Even a RAT (rookie, amateur, tourist) can have a nice knife. In case it wasn't clear, this was my first-ever attempt at sushi in any form. The tuna was excellent and per pound, actually cost less than the wasabi! :shock:

    Image
    Rolling Station
    Looks neat and organized -- and it was -- but only because I hadn't started rolling yet. I was not able to capture on camera the hijinks that were about to ensue.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Spicy tuna rolls -- including one especially pathetic attempt at an inside-out roll, as I was running out of rice -- and some tuna nigiri. No, kindergarteners did not break into my kitchen and roll these while I stepped out. This is just my very amateur work but happily, I started with good ingredients, so everything tasted great. Overall, quite a humbling experience but one that left me really wanting to try it again soon. Sooo much to learn.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1945 - March 14th, 2021, 1:29 pm
    Post #1945 - March 14th, 2021, 1:29 pm Post #1945 - March 14th, 2021, 1:29 pm
    My wife and I have a running joke about what we'll eat for brunch on Sunday mornings. When she asks what we're having, I usually reply that whatever falls out of the fridge when I open it is what we'll be having. Today, that was literally the case, as some uncooked Italian sausage that was leftover from the other night's SausageFest tumbled out when I opened the door . . .

    Image
    Italian Sausage, Sauteed Onions & Peppers, Provolone and Cheddar Cheese Omelet
    With buttered Country Square toast from Middlebrow Bungalow.

    I also included some of the leftover sauteed peppers & onions from the other night and some cheeses. In my zeal to use everything up, I way overstuffed this fatboi, so when I failed to flip it successfully, I lidded the pan instead to help everything finish cooking. That worked out just fine.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1946 - March 14th, 2021, 1:33 pm
    Post #1946 - March 14th, 2021, 1:33 pm Post #1946 - March 14th, 2021, 1:33 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Nice. What was the coating and what's that pan? That's a nice looking unit.

    I soaked the walleye for about 45-min in milk with a little k-salt. Rinsed, tossed in a Ziploc flour mixed with rub. There was enough residual moisture to give it a slight coating as opposed to light dusting. Pan fry, turned out great.

    Pan is Matfer Bourgeat Black Steel Fry Pan, I have a few and, once broken in, work incredibly well. Available on Amazon. Here is a link to their web site. Link

    ronnie_suburban wrote:Plated Up

    Looks Fantastic! Nice score on the fresh wasabi.
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1947 - March 14th, 2021, 1:56 pm
    Post #1947 - March 14th, 2021, 1:56 pm Post #1947 - March 14th, 2021, 1:56 pm
    G Wiv wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:I soaked the walleye for about 45-min in milk with a little k-salt. Rinsed, tossed in a Ziploc flour mixed with rub. There was enough residual moisture to give it a slight coating as opposed to light dusting. Pan fry, turned out great.

    Pan is Matfer Bourgeat Black Steel Fry Pan, I have a few and, once broken in, work incredibly well. Available on Amazon. Here is a link to their web site. Link

    Excellent-looking fish. Not surprised it turned out great. I suspected from the sloped sides that the pan might a Matfer Bourgeat. I have one but it's way too big for everyday use, so I haven't bothered to break it in yet (still unused). Maybe I should trade down for a smaller one. I'm having a case of pan envy! :D

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1948 - March 14th, 2021, 2:10 pm
    Post #1948 - March 14th, 2021, 2:10 pm Post #1948 - March 14th, 2021, 2:10 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:I suspected from the sloped sides that the pan might a Matfer Bourgeat. I have one but it's way too big for everyday use, so I haven't bothered to break it in yet (still unused).

    Pictured is a 9-1/2. I have a couple of those and a 12" (actually 11-7/8) I was thinking of one the 8-5/8 and the 14" for my next Matfer Bourgeat purchase. Good value for quality and they will last 5-lifetimes if you don't let them rust. They are so sturdy I used one to bang/chip some ice from my patio brick steps a few weeks ago. No pans were harmed by my stupidity.

    They break in really nicely and have a unique recommended method of seasoning. Link

    What's the brand of carbon steel you have? If I remember it looked great.
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #1949 - March 14th, 2021, 2:34 pm
    Post #1949 - March 14th, 2021, 2:34 pm Post #1949 - March 14th, 2021, 2:34 pm
    G Wiv wrote:What's the brand of carbon steel you have? If I remember it looked great.

    I have a few but the ones I really like are the Blanc Creatives Heritage line. The Misen carbon steel pans are pretty nice, too. Unfortunately, the Matfer I bought is the 17" pan and I can barely lift it. I had something specific in mind when I bought it but that was in the before times and I can't even remember what it was at this point. :?

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #1950 - March 14th, 2021, 6:26 pm
    Post #1950 - March 14th, 2021, 6:26 pm Post #1950 - March 14th, 2021, 6:26 pm
    Wow - nice that it's still light out after dinner! That's a welcome change. Sunday Roast again, using the second half of a boneless rib roast from Costco that's been in the freezer since last month . . .

    Image
    Rib Roast & Kuwabara White #2 Tall Petty, 115mm
    Trussed, oiled and seasoned. Had some leftover Manale spice mix from the BBQ Shrimp I made earlier in the week and remembering that the first half of this roast was fairly bland, I decided to deploy it here. And yeah, I could have used kitchen shears for the butcher twine but why? :D

    Image
    Shallots & Kuwabara White #2 Tall Petty, 115mm
    Enjoying this fun new knife, which glides easily, even on the horizontal cuts of the mince. This is prep for a gravy. By coincidence, I happened to be making beef stock today, so the timing was fortuitous.

    Image
    Creminis, Minced Garlic & Kuwabara White #2 Tall Petty, 115mm
    More chopping with this fun little knife -- just about the perfect tool for this task. It requires very little real estate to operate, so I could keep going as my board filled up (I try to avoid overhandling the mushrooms to keep them from breaking apart).

    Image
    Boneless Rib Roast & Konosuke Fujiyama Blue #2 Sujihiki, 270mm
    ~3 hours @ 200F, followed by 6 minutes convection roasted at 450F. Thinking about it, it's kind of an oxymoron to call it rib roast if it has no bones. More accurate to just call it a ribless roast. :P

    Image
    Plated Up
    With shallot-beef stock gravy (also included some pan drippings), garlic & red wine-sauteed mushrooms and Mrs. Suburban's illustrious roasted broccoli.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain

Contact

About

Team

Advertize

Close

Chat

Articles

Guide

Events

more