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Corona cuisine / Social distancing cooking
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  • Post #91 - March 16th, 2020, 7:11 pm
    Post #91 - March 16th, 2020, 7:11 pm Post #91 - March 16th, 2020, 7:11 pm
    How an extraordinary secret meeting of Chicago chefs grew into a commanding voice to seek help from the governor

    at chicagotribune.com, Josh Noel wrote:It began with one text message.

    On Saturday morning, Jason Vincent, the chef behind Giant and Chef’s Special Cocktail Bar, reached out to his longtime friend and former boss, Jason Hammel, the founder of Logan Square dining staple Lula Cafe.

    Vincent asked to get together Sunday, to talk through the public health crisis that was fast becoming a restaurant industry crisis: What could they do to take care of their employees amid cratering business? To boost the chances of their businesses surviving? To be good community stewards? Hammel agreed.

    Vincent reached out to a few more restaurant owners to add a few more bodies to the conversation: Diana Davila of Mi Tocaya, Joe Frillman of Daisies and Abe Conlon of Fat Rice. Someone asked if they could invite a few other people. Vincent said sure.

    By 1 p.m. Sunday, the meeting that had begun with a single text message had become a standing-room affair at Chef’s Special. Every chair and stool was occupied. People stood behind the bar. In the back of the room, late arrivers raised themselves on tiptoe to see what was happening.

    The gathering took on a tone of therapy as much as strategy.

    “Everyone wants community right now,” Vincent said. “And it was really beautiful.”

    The restaurant owners had purposefully not announced the meeting beyond informal texts and calls. They also decided not to invite media or stream the discussion on social media.

    At a perilous moment where it seems as if any of their businesses might be in peril — and certainly the livelihoods of the vast majority of their employees was indeed in peril — they wanted to close ranks. To talk and listen, to learn and share anxieties and ideas.

    Rick Bayless showed up. Stephanie Izard, too. And Paul Kahan.

    Those veteran voices spoke, offering honest, unfiltered opinions about how to survive an industry crisis no one in the room had envisioned even a month ago. Hammel, who launched Lula in 1999, well before Logan Square was a destination neighborhood, took much of the lead. But more than a dozen people spoke during the hour-long meeting.

    "Nobody pulled punches or pretended they weren’t freaked out,” Vincent said.

    Bayless called the meeting “one of most amazing experiences in my 33 years in the business."

    “We had people in that room asking for recommendations on what to do, ways to get a loan," he said, stating the crowd numbered 74 chefs and restaurant owners. "People who poured their lives into places that they have to close. It was super intense.”

    But most of the concern rested on their employees.

    “We have people who work paycheck to paycheck, and they haven’t been getting full paychecks for awhile," Bayless said. "And now, nothing’s coming in. These are people I’ve been working with for 30 years; I can’t turn my back on them. And all that was before the announcement.”

    “The announcement” came shortly after the meeting ended: Gov. J.B. Pritzker ordered all Illinois bars and restaurants to close for dine-in business for at least two weeks. But most if not all of the business owners in the room had seen their fortunes dipping for weeks. Pritzker’s shutdown order had seemed inevitable.

    “We’ve had almost no people in our restaurants,” Bayless said. "We’ve been in total triage mode, thinking of what to do. In some ways, this puts a start time to it. This mode is more drastic, but the other was that nobody was getting enough hours, and there wasn’t enough revenue to keep open. At least now we know what’s coming next."

    Now the concern is that the shutdown order will last well beyond two weeks.

    “The fear that lies with the chef-owners is that we can figure out something for maybe two weeks, but not for two months,” Bayless said.

    Many Illinois restaurants, which can stay open for carry out and delivery, have begun to furlough employees with a twofold hope: of bringing them back when business returns to normalcy, and that the businesses can pay bills and taxes and rents long enough to survive.

    Some restaurants have girded for a possible shutdown for weeks, devising new revenue streams — such as delivery and subscription services — while also constantly weighing the benefits of closing to help stem the spread of COVID-19 versus getting employees a few more nights of salary.

    Davilia, whose Mi Tocaya has become a James Beard-award finalist since launching three years ago, is less immediately well positioned to transition to the new reality. Almost all Mi Tocaya sales are dine-in, Davila said.

    “We are trying to figure out how to convert a dine-in business to a to-go business,” she said. “I will come up with a to-go menu, but how do I market it? How do I get this information out there? How many people can I employ to execute this? Will I have any business? I don’t know. But I have to try.”

    The meeting made clear that most people in the room were wrestling with similar calculations, Davila said. This Sunday, she said, Mi Tocaya had 16 reservations — down from the 100 of a typical Sunday. She chose not to open, knowing she would be shut down for at least two weeks, anyway.

    “It can be very daunting to think, ‘Where do I start?’” Davila said. "Listening to (other chefs at the meeting) provided a clearer path on what to do next and what my message should be to my staff.”

    Davila said she will keep the restaurant open for staff meals every afternoon, and will make Mi Tocaya available to her 24 employees, many of whom are now furloughed.

    “I can’t provide them with hours, but our doors are open to them,” she said. “They can use space for social reasons; they can draw, paint, dance, whatever. I want to provide a safe place for them.”

    By the end of Sunday’s meeting, the group had devised a letter to Pritzker, outlining the help they needed to survive the shutdown. Written mostly by Hammel, the letter called on the governor to support emergency unemployment benefits for hourly and salaried industry workers, to eliminate the payroll tax and to push for rent and loan abatements for affected workers.

    The social media team from Honey Butter Fried Chicken offered guidance on how to share the message, and what social media channels. By 6 p.m., many of the people in that room were sharing videos of themselves reading a statement.

    People left with, if not quite a sense of optimism, a sense of unity.

    “When your heroes and understood leaders in the industry make clear they’re suffering and they’re worried about your suffering, it’s one very important form of leadership in this mess," said Pete Ternes, co-founder of Bungalow restaurant and Middle Brow brewery in Logan Square. "When you can’t get certainty from the government, it helps to know industry leaders are at your back and fighting with you.”

    As the meeting broke up, in part to hear Pritzker’s announcement, everyone said goodbye with back pats and by bumping elbows.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #92 - March 16th, 2020, 7:27 pm
    Post #92 - March 16th, 2020, 7:27 pm Post #92 - March 16th, 2020, 7:27 pm
    G Wiv wrote:I'm thinking either baked spicy wings, congee with wings

    I went baked spicy wings with one pack, the other will be used for congee. Ellen bought a Jewels strip steak for her dinner, ~fine~ but she did comment it wasn't Joseph's. :lol:

    CCP4.jpg Baked spicy wings

    CCP6.jpg Jewels strip steak
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #93 - March 16th, 2020, 9:19 pm
    Post #93 - March 16th, 2020, 9:19 pm Post #93 - March 16th, 2020, 9:19 pm
    Hi- I just spoke to my sister in New Orleans, and she told me that this afternoon the Governor of Louisiana announced that he was closing bars, nightclubs and casinos statewide starting at midnight tonight, and he was limiting restaurants to only being open for delivery, takeout or drive up. Malls and movie theaters are going to be closed too.

    Amazon is hiring 100,000 extra employees. They are planning on hiring people who have lost jobs in restaurants, bars and other businesses. They are temporarily going to raise their starting wage to $17 an hour.
  • Post #94 - March 17th, 2020, 1:26 am
    Post #94 - March 17th, 2020, 1:26 am Post #94 - March 17th, 2020, 1:26 am
    Just listening to the radio, Pennsylvania is closing their interstate rest stops. Truck stops remain open.

    I like rest stops for the quick in-and-out. I hope this is not going to be reflected in too many states, but who knows.

    Meanwhile, another election judge declined. Where I work today will be staffed at the bare minimum. The hope is few voters, too, because early voting escalated this last week after this virus-wrapped bomb.

    Toria posted this on FB, it could be useful to all of us:
    I’m a nun and I’ve been social distancing for 29 years. Here are tips for staying home amid coronavirus fears.

    How to make the most of a stretched-thin pantry

    Second, much is to be honored in the bounty of what the Italians call “cucina povera,” the cooking of the poor. It uses less expensive cuts of meat protein (or, indeed, little or no meat at all); stretches ingredients with pulses, grains or vegetables; and uses lengthy cooking methods to develop layers of flavors and aromas.


    There are posts on LTH from Antonius on 'cucina povera.' Some of my favorite come from the use of dried bread.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #95 - March 17th, 2020, 12:39 pm
    Post #95 - March 17th, 2020, 12:39 pm Post #95 - March 17th, 2020, 12:39 pm
    Over ripe bananas = Banana Muffins. #socialdistancingcooking

    BMP2.jpg Banana Muffins

    BMP3.jpg Banana Muffins

    BMP1.jpg Banana Muffins
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #96 - March 17th, 2020, 5:37 pm
    Post #96 - March 17th, 2020, 5:37 pm Post #96 - March 17th, 2020, 5:37 pm
    Moderators' note: As discussion of corona-related matters has grown, we are trying to keep the various topics somewhat organized.

    This thread is best for posts about shopping and cooking.

    Discussion of actual restaurants, delivery options, etc. is best placed in threads devoted to those restaurants or in Restaurants in the era of social distancing
  • Post #97 - March 17th, 2020, 7:14 pm
    Post #97 - March 17th, 2020, 7:14 pm Post #97 - March 17th, 2020, 7:14 pm
    Stores are out of bread so I made some.

    Image
    Last edited by gastro gnome on March 17th, 2020, 9:51 pm, edited 2 times in total.
  • Post #98 - March 17th, 2020, 8:08 pm
    Post #98 - March 17th, 2020, 8:08 pm Post #98 - March 17th, 2020, 8:08 pm
    I'm keeping a journal of the meals we eat while in isolation (which we've been doing since friday). Also noting weather, activities, big events in the news...
  • Post #99 - March 17th, 2020, 8:31 pm
    Post #99 - March 17th, 2020, 8:31 pm Post #99 - March 17th, 2020, 8:31 pm
    annak wrote:I'm keeping a journal of the meals we eat while in isolation (which we've been doing since friday). Also noting weather, activities, big events in the news...

    You might want to take some pictures, too. Deerfield Historical Society took a picture of the Metra commuter lot. Only a few cars were present on Monday in what is otherwise a packed lot.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #100 - March 17th, 2020, 8:35 pm
    Post #100 - March 17th, 2020, 8:35 pm Post #100 - March 17th, 2020, 8:35 pm
    Happy Saint Paddy's Day! #homecooking #socialdistancingcooking

    CornedBeefP2.jpg Happy Saint Paddy's Day! #homecooking


    Saint Paddy's Day, count me a Fan!
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #101 - March 17th, 2020, 9:20 pm
    Post #101 - March 17th, 2020, 9:20 pm Post #101 - March 17th, 2020, 9:20 pm
    gastro gnome wrote:Stores are out of bread so I made some.

    Not sure what happened, gg. Your image, which looked great, was displaying correctly earlier. What kind of bread did you bake? I was thinking about doing the same but so far, I've been able to find decent bread when I've looked for it.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #102 - March 17th, 2020, 9:25 pm
    Post #102 - March 17th, 2020, 9:25 pm Post #102 - March 17th, 2020, 9:25 pm
    I realize that this is only very peripherally related but I had a good laugh when I saw this headline. It was reminiscent of a Portlandia episode . . .

    Oregon Police Remind Residents: Don't Call 911 If You Run Out Of Toilet Paper

    at npr.org, Colin Dwyer wrote:The coronavirus has not been kind to supplies of toilet paper. Along with the obvious items, such as hand sanitizer and other disinfectants, the rolls of tissue have been increasingly hard to find at local markets, as people stock up to hunker down during the global pandemic.

    But please, for goodness' sake, don't panic if you run out.

    That, at least, is the earnest request of the police department in Newport, Ore.

    "It's hard to believe that we even have to post this. Do not call 9-1-1 just because you ran out of toilet paper," the department told residents in a reminder posted to Facebook last weekend. "You will survive without our assistance."

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #103 - March 17th, 2020, 9:46 pm
    Post #103 - March 17th, 2020, 9:46 pm Post #103 - March 17th, 2020, 9:46 pm
    I went to the Jewel on Chicago Ave this evening, and there were about a third as many customers as there were on Thursday in Wilmette. The bread department was only about 25% filled, but I was able to get some Brownberry bread. I also got some yeast in case I decide to make my own bread. I have plenty of flour, but they were out of flour which surprised me.They were out of wipes and 1% milk and toilet paper too They had a limit of 2 gallons on the milk and one package of toilet paper per brand. They should have limited the toilet paper to one package period. I am glad I bought a package of toilet paper three weeks ago before the raid began. If I would have waited until I needed it, I would have been out of luck. Jewel is only open now until 10:00pm. Hopefully there will be a lot more toilet paper in stock before I run out again. Jewel has toilet paper on sale starting tomorrow assuming you can find it. It was definitely a more pleasant shopping trip there tonight than it was last Thursday. I'll be glad though when the shelves aren't depleted. Hope this helps, Nancy
  • Post #104 - March 17th, 2020, 9:55 pm
    Post #104 - March 17th, 2020, 9:55 pm Post #104 - March 17th, 2020, 9:55 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    gastro gnome wrote:Stores are out of bread so I made some.

    Not sure what happened, gg. Your image, which looked great, was displaying correctly earlier. What kind of bread did you bake? I was thinking about doing the same but so far, I've been able to find decent bread when I've looked for it.

    =R=


    Weird. I still see the photo when I load the page. I used JoelF's trick about pasting the Google Image with the ID scaled down for allowable pixels, but maybe it was too big. I tried scaling the photo down. Maybe it is displaying correctly now.

    I made a transitional wheat bread from Peter Reinhart's Whole Grain Breads (in the background). It's been years since I was an avid bread baker. In the spirit of using up things I have rather than hounding semi-stocked groceries, I decided to bake some bread to utilize whole wheat flour and some yeast I had on hand. I wasn't sure the yeast was any good. My yeast test suggested it's a bit past its prime. I wound up doubling the quantity and it seems like the loaf rose as expected. Once I cut into it, I'll see if anything seems out of sorts or if I will continue to do a 1.5-2x yeast ratio for further bread. I will continue to bake some loaves for the next few weeks - not because I think bread will continue to be scarce, but because I don't know when else I will be using this wheat flour and since I'm sequestered at home right now, it is good to have some projects to look forward to each day.
  • Post #105 - March 17th, 2020, 10:04 pm
    Post #105 - March 17th, 2020, 10:04 pm Post #105 - March 17th, 2020, 10:04 pm
    I should also say that I was surprised to find that all the flour was gone as was all the yeast when I went to a store late on Sunday. I had planned to pick up new yeast in case my old stores didn't work. I made do with what I had on hand and I'm glad it worked.

    To be honest, I am really surprised that the flour was gone. I was operating under an assumption that people were averse to making stuff from scratch (which is why produce seems to be in stock). But I guess that flour is a shelf-stable ingredient and maybe people are planning to do baking projects with kids home from school. I sure hope that the flour (like the other hoarded food) is being used and not just sitting on a shelf somewhere making it easier for someone to sleep at night.

    By the way, I saw a suggestion to donate to a food pantry to help them deal with unexpected demands during this time (more people are home eating more meals, schools are out with the meals they may have provided, and the scarcity of staples at local stores). I thought that was a great idea and sent another contribution to the Greater Chicago Food Depository. I hope others who are able to do so consider donations to service organizations that can help those in need right now.
  • Post #106 - March 17th, 2020, 11:33 pm
    Post #106 - March 17th, 2020, 11:33 pm Post #106 - March 17th, 2020, 11:33 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:I realize that this is only very peripherally related but I had a good laugh when I saw this headline. It was reminiscent of a Portlandia episode . . .

    Oregon Police Remind Residents: Don't Call 911 If You Run Out Of Toilet Paper

    at npr.org, Colin Dwyer wrote:The coronavirus has not been kind to supplies of toilet paper. Along with the obvious items, such as hand sanitizer and other disinfectants, the rolls of tissue have been increasingly hard to find at local markets, as people stock up to hunker down during the global pandemic.

    But please, for goodness' sake, don't panic if you run out.

    That, at least, is the earnest request of the police department in Newport, Ore.

    "It's hard to believe that we even have to post this. Do not call 9-1-1 just because you ran out of toilet paper," the department told residents in a reminder posted to Facebook last weekend. "You will survive without our assistance."

    =R=


    They should have pointed out that with the impending lack of food, there will be little need for the TP.
  • Post #107 - March 18th, 2020, 9:43 am
    Post #107 - March 18th, 2020, 9:43 am Post #107 - March 18th, 2020, 9:43 am
    A theif broke a car window and stole 60 rolls of toilet paper, as well as other valuables, in Eugene Oregon.
    https://www.oregonlive.com/coronavirus/2020/03/thief-smashed-car-window-and-stole-toilet-paper-eugene-police-say.html
  • Post #108 - March 18th, 2020, 6:36 pm
    Post #108 - March 18th, 2020, 6:36 pm Post #108 - March 18th, 2020, 6:36 pm
    G Wiv wrote:Leaning toward congee as one cup rice yields 10-12 cups of filling comfort packed congee.

    CongeeP20.jpg Congee, simple, satisfying, inexpensive, delicious. #homecooking #socialdistancingcooking

    Congee, count me a Fan!
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #109 - March 18th, 2020, 6:43 pm
    Post #109 - March 18th, 2020, 6:43 pm Post #109 - March 18th, 2020, 6:43 pm
    G Wiv wrote:
    G Wiv wrote:Leaning toward congee as one cup rice yields 10-12 cups of filling comfort packed congee.

    CongeeP20.jpg

    Congee, count me a Fan!


    Curious Gary, which rice (since you schooled me on the correct variety for toasting & grinding)?

    I do my congee Pinoy lugaw style with extra ginger and a twist of lemon. Saving that for the deep scrounge in upcoming months. Ran through my last rich Asian chicken stock tonight making wonton soup though and chicken seems scarce!
  • Post #110 - March 18th, 2020, 7:04 pm
    Post #110 - March 18th, 2020, 7:04 pm Post #110 - March 18th, 2020, 7:04 pm
    Jefe wrote:Curious Gary, which rice (since you schooled me on the correct variety for toasting & grinding)?

    I've been using jasmine rice, teaspoon kosher salt, roughly 14/1 water/rice, bring to a boil, 1 1/2 to 2-hour low simmer. It's my understanding, short grain or regular long grain will work fine. According to what I've read basmati does not work well for congee, though I have no idea of the reason.

    Tonight I used 6-wings and a bit of chive that has popped up in our garden to finish, last time a dollop of Vegetarian Better Than Bouillon No Chicken Base and green onion. Sometimes pork bones, veg scraps, ginger, or even just plain water. To me congee is all about what you add in, though it can be satisfying, at least to me, with just a sprinkle of Maldon. I particularly like green onion, jammy eggs, fermented tofu, chili oil, sesame oil, soy, xo sauce, shredded fried dace with salted black beans, though not all at the same time. :)

    Re toasting and grinding rice (khao khua), mainly for Thai/Lao salads, that Jefe is referring to. Seems lots of people incorrectly use long grain or jasmine rice, this does not grind fine enough and leaves a gritty texture. The proper rice for toasting is raw sticky rice. Link
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #111 - March 19th, 2020, 1:48 pm
    Post #111 - March 19th, 2020, 1:48 pm Post #111 - March 19th, 2020, 1:48 pm
    I'm working on my bread skills, being homebound so much. Here is today's effort. The no knead sourdough bread recipe from Breadtopia.

    This is a 2 cup white ap flour and two cup breadflour, with 1.75 cups of water.
    bread3192020a.jpg Sourdough White bread
  • Post #112 - March 19th, 2020, 10:20 pm
    Post #112 - March 19th, 2020, 10:20 pm Post #112 - March 19th, 2020, 10:20 pm
    Xexo wrote:The no knead sourdough bread recipe from Breadtopia.

    Nice looking loaf, Xexo.

    Crossing over from another thread, Andong's most recent video is entertaining and has a lot of great information. For many of the seasoned home cooks here, it may be mostly familiar but I still enjoyed the video, especially the tone and the message . . .


    Pantry Essentials & Smart Food Shopping For Social Distancing!

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #113 - March 20th, 2020, 3:10 pm
    Post #113 - March 20th, 2020, 3:10 pm Post #113 - March 20th, 2020, 3:10 pm
    Anxiety shopping was in full swing this afternoon at Jewel in Highland Park.

    Full parking lot.

    I had a list of incidentals I wanted, which I mostly found all I needed.

    It is so easy to join the swing of things: there was one bag of lemons left. I debated whether I really needed them, then dismissed the idea. I spent more time thinking about this than I might otherwise ever do. I had to keep reminding myself, I really don't need them.

    I alerted a friend who has been trying hard to avoid peak panic shopping. I told her the window of opportunity is closed for the moment.

    Fortunately, grocery stores, pharmacies, take-out and the interstate will be open for the duration.

    Regards,
    CAthy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #114 - March 20th, 2020, 4:03 pm
    Post #114 - March 20th, 2020, 4:03 pm Post #114 - March 20th, 2020, 4:03 pm
    Hi- I though some people might be interested in this. Milk Street's online classes are free through 4/30. So many people here are spending a lot more time at home, and so this is something to keep you busy. Has anybody taken any of their online classes? Are they any good?

    I have been getting a lot of emails lately from America's Test Kitchen too, and they are offering a lot of stuff for free right now including lots of recipes. They are all working at home right now. Hope this helps, Nancy
  • Post #115 - March 20th, 2020, 5:15 pm
    Post #115 - March 20th, 2020, 5:15 pm Post #115 - March 20th, 2020, 5:15 pm
    G Wiv wrote:It's my understanding, short grain or regular long grain will work fine. According to what I've read basmati does not work well for congee, though I have no idea of the reason.


    There's basically two major subspecies of rice: Oryza Sativa Indica and Oryza Sativa Japonica, (although some identify six subspecies; these are the most common). To quote wikipedia:

    Japonica rice is also stickier due to the higher content of amylopectin, whereas Indica rice starch consists of less amylopectin and more amylose.

    So if you are looking for making congee; you should look for short or medium grain rice. It exudes starch while cooking so therefore makes better congee. Same with making Risotto or Paella. You need the short/medium grain variety that exudes starch. Basmati is better for Pilafs and Biryanis where you want the rice grains to stay separate.
    The art of living well and art of dying well are one. ---Epicurus
  • Post #116 - March 21st, 2020, 10:36 am
    Post #116 - March 21st, 2020, 10:36 am Post #116 - March 21st, 2020, 10:36 am
    Leek posted this on facebook:
    A woman on one of my FB cooking groups posted this -

    “I love to cook more than anything. It is my respite from my job as a physician. If you are looking for a way to help us outside of providing meals and snacks for your local health care workers, please please please consider stopping cooking and spending a day on your phones contacting local businesses and asking them to donate their N95 masks or surgical masks. Especially dental, orthodontic and aesthetician offices, nail salons, construction sites and pest control businesses. Please gather masks and donate to your local hospitals, outpatient clinics and urgent care centers. We're running out and we are sitting ducks. We would literally rather have these than food. Please.

    Edited to say, feel free to share.”

    My state has donation drop off and mail in sites, maybe yours does too

    Please consider donating your surplus Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
    Requested items include:

    latex-free gloves
    procedural masks
    surgical masks
    N95 respirators and N95 filters
    Other respirators (P100’s, PAPR’s, and PAPR supplies / parts)
    face shields
    splash shields
    gowns
    hand sanitizer
    disinfecting wipes
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #117 - March 21st, 2020, 6:19 pm
    Post #117 - March 21st, 2020, 6:19 pm Post #117 - March 21st, 2020, 6:19 pm
    I tried to post this Friday, March 13 after trying to shop after work. I had trouble getting photos to this site. Thanks to RonnieSuburban, I can now share photos that sadly will no longer seem strange to any of you.

    I took photos, because, luckily, I have never seen anything like this in my lifetime.

    No canned goods:
    Image

    No chicken:
    Image

    No meat:
    Image

    No toilet paper:
    Image

    I was at both Meijer and Aldi in Bolingbrook.

    Casey's in Naperville had hundreds waiting in line for meat last Saturday. I thought I was in good shape with my number J-35 and they were on 15. But someone let me know they were on I-15 and had to go through to 100 before they started on the J's. They are still busy, but it has calmed down a bit. They have meat (though they are out of some things, like their stuffed turkey breast).

    Since then, we have done some pre-ordering from Meijer. You can pick-up curbside for a fee. But they are out of things that are now considered rare (flour, toilet paper, liquid soap)...

    So much has already changed in the past week and I will probably repeat myself next week.

    I worked through Thursday, though mine was one of the few cars in the parking garage for a 6-floor office building. Now I am home for the foreseeable future.

    We have been cooking more than ever before. Just baked some banana bread (Cook's Illustrated) with my daughter. Thanks again to Ronnie for his help with my photos!

    Image

    I am appreciative of this LTH community. Even though we are apart, we're together.
  • Post #118 - March 21st, 2020, 6:43 pm
    Post #118 - March 21st, 2020, 6:43 pm Post #118 - March 21st, 2020, 6:43 pm
    janeyb wrote:Since then, we have done some pre-ordering from Meijer. You can pick-up curbside for a fee. But they are out of things that are now considered rare (flour, toilet paper, liquid soap)...

    If you have reason to go in the direction of Midway Airport, I saw toilet paper, paper towels and bleach at Continental Sales. They limited two items in the paper category, so bring someone with you. I bought two rolls of paper towels and one bleach, because I could not remember if I had any or not.

    They have reduced their hours during this time to 9 am to 5 pm. A manager commented they needed to reduce hours because their staff is overworked in the current situation.

    6333 S Cicero Ave, Chicago, IL 60638
    Phone: (773) 581-8100
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #119 - March 22nd, 2020, 8:29 pm
    Post #119 - March 22nd, 2020, 8:29 pm Post #119 - March 22nd, 2020, 8:29 pm
    Pretty proud of today's cooking experiment, it's not photogenic but it was delicious. Trini dhalpuri roti wrapped around curry potato, brown stew chicken, tamarind sauce, and kuchela, a condiment based on green mango and curry spices.

    IMG_0997 copy.JPG
    Ronnie said I should probably tell you guys about my website so

    Hey I have a website.
    http://www.sandwichtribunal.com
  • Post #120 - March 22nd, 2020, 11:35 pm
    Post #120 - March 22nd, 2020, 11:35 pm Post #120 - March 22nd, 2020, 11:35 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:If you have reason to go in the direction of Midway Airport, I saw toilet paper, paper towels and bleach at Continental Sales. They limited two items in the paper category, so bring someone with you.

    That's the spirit! If stores put in rules to prevent hoarding and try to spread items in limited supply as widely as possible, try to find a way around them.

    Good news for the rest of us: the paper product shortage is temporary.

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