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    Post #1 - September 29th, 2020, 8:08 pm
    Post #1 - September 29th, 2020, 8:08 pm Post #1 - September 29th, 2020, 8:08 pm
    Hi,

    A friend stopped by inquiring if I liked spaghetti squash. I remember trying to like spaghetti squash, but not quite pulling it off. I agreed to take a 5 lb 4 oz. spaghetti squash off her hands.

    As a first step, I split, deseeded and baked it off. After it was removed from the oven and cooled enough to handle, I had just shy of 3 lb spaghetti squash and sent to the mulch pile a shell weighing 4 oz. It is rather astonishing how two pounds disappeared by removing seeds and perhaps some evaporation during baking.

    For lunch tomorrow, I plan to make Spicy Lamb Meatballs with Coconut Curry Spaghetti Squash. I will use half of the squash for this meal.

    Depending on the outcome, I might freeze the squash for a later date or make something else. I saw some clever ideas in this article featuring "10 genius ways to cook with it."

    I am once again trying to like spaghetti squash, to be continued.

    Regards,
    CAthy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #2 - September 29th, 2020, 10:07 pm
    Post #2 - September 29th, 2020, 10:07 pm Post #2 - September 29th, 2020, 10:07 pm
    It took me awhile to realize that the trick is to treat spaghetti squash like squash, and not like spaghetti. It's tempting to add marinara, etc., and when I've fallen into that trap, I've always left unhappy. When I've gone more with the flavors I'd use on, say, acorn squash, it's been more successful
  • Post #3 - September 29th, 2020, 10:51 pm
    Post #3 - September 29th, 2020, 10:51 pm Post #3 - September 29th, 2020, 10:51 pm
    I'm getting so much squash in my weekly CSA box and technically speaking, we're still in their 'summer' season. Once 'fall' starts, the amount of squash is only going to increase. I really am not a fan of hard squash because it's just too sweet for me. I recently made spaghetti squash and was reminded that no matter what I do to it, I just don't like it. My wife likes it, so that's good. I'll continue to make it for her.

    I also recently made Honey Nut squash, which I'd never seen before. They were cute, so that was encouraging. And in spite of its name -- or maybe because of how I prepped it -- it seemed less sweet than other squashes but it was still too sweet for me. I know I'm in the minority on this but it's just not something I want to eat, especially as a side dish with more savory items.

    I can see using it in dessert/baking applications, so maybe I'll explore that in the coming weeks. And I have a lot of friends who really love squash, so it'll be easy enough to give it away to those who appreciate it and will put it to good use.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #4 - September 30th, 2020, 7:31 am
    Post #4 - September 30th, 2020, 7:31 am Post #4 - September 30th, 2020, 7:31 am
    These comments are interesting because I have exactly the opposite take:
    1. I love treating it as pasta and putting a nice, hearty, meat sauce on it. The nutty flavor is different than pasta, but a nice variation.
    2. Unless it's cooked with some sugar, I would never describe the flavor as sweet. Some, like Delicata, have what I might call a slight hint of sweetness, but that's about it.
    Interesting how varied the response can be to some kinds of food (maybe all kinds!),
  • Post #5 - September 30th, 2020, 1:32 pm
    Post #5 - September 30th, 2020, 1:32 pm Post #5 - September 30th, 2020, 1:32 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:For lunch tomorrow, I plan to make Spicy Lamb Meatballs with Coconut Curry Spaghetti Squash.

    Hi,

    I had less than 1.5 pounds of ground lamb with other plans for a pound. I used for the meatballs approximately 50:50 lamb and turkey. I made the meatballs marble sized for quick cooking and simply because I like this size.

    I used one tablespoon of curry, instead of two, for the coconut sauce.

    Each serving began with a generous quantity of reheated unseasoned spaghetti squash, curry coconut sauce topped by the meatballs. The meatballs with lots of garlic and well salted pulled it all together.

    When searching last night, I saw MHays recommending cooking a pot roast over spaghetti squash. It was something her husband experienced at the Fire House.

    I think I can work with spaghetti squash going into the future. I have half left I may cook now or freeze for the future.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #6 - October 1st, 2020, 6:35 pm
    Post #6 - October 1st, 2020, 6:35 pm Post #6 - October 1st, 2020, 6:35 pm
    Hi,

    The remaining squash was treated like a casserole. I stirred in a package of dried Ranch dressing, chopped ham, a cup of frozen peas, minced onion plus salt and pepper.

    I spread it on foil lined jelly roll pan to increase surface area and sprinkled on some bread crumbs. I wanted a drier rather than wetter product.

    I really didn't want cheese, though it could have improved the experience. I could have made it worse by adding 1/2 - 1 cup of Ranch dressing. Adding more wet to an already wet squash was just not needed.

    I contemplated making a peanut sauce, which probably would have been very good. Pesto was also on the line-up of ideas, too, but I was not in the mood.

    We ate it, though it will not be repeated. Lamb meatballs with curry-coconut sauce, that can be repeated.

    Lesson learned: I will no longer be adverse to a spaghetti squash.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast

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