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    Post #1 - June 2nd, 2021, 11:28 am
    Post #1 - June 2nd, 2021, 11:28 am Post #1 - June 2nd, 2021, 11:28 am
    i am excited to be hosting my largest vaccinated gathering next week, and the guest of honor requested smoked brisket along with traditional-ish bbq fixins like mac-n-cheese and slaw.

    what are your current favorite slaw recipes? we are very partial to a miso-ginger-soy red cabbage slaw and a david leibovitz super garlicky creamy slaw, and our one big no-no is sweetness.

    among the many wonders of Ronnie's cooking documentary in the Corona Cuisine thread is his weekly batch of slaw, and that plus the convo here last week about "red slaw", plus looking to possibly balancing the mac-n-cheese with a non-creamy slaw, i thought i would get some debating going.
  • Post #2 - June 2nd, 2021, 11:37 am
    Post #2 - June 2nd, 2021, 11:37 am Post #2 - June 2nd, 2021, 11:37 am
    My absolute favorite slaw is the one served at Smoque. The two defining factors are the tangy oil and vinegar dressing, and the use of red onion, rather than red cabbage, to give it both color and added flavor. Don't have a recipe to share, but if Smoque will sell you a quantity of the dressing, you should be able to construct a reasonable facsimile at home using shredded green cabbage and red onion.

    Buddy
  • Post #3 - June 2nd, 2021, 12:13 pm
    Post #3 - June 2nd, 2021, 12:13 pm Post #3 - June 2nd, 2021, 12:13 pm
    Well, I experimented with A LOT of slaw combinations during lockdown and more than any recipe, I think successful slaw comes down to two techniques: salting/squeezing the cabbage and finely grating a sweet onion into the dressing (and admittedly, even that's as much a recipe move as it is one of technique).

    I typically use 1.5% of the total cabbage/veg weight to pre-salt it (Kosher salt). Obviously, this comes down to preference but I think this makes the cabbage more palatable, both texturally (softens it a bit) and flavorwise (removes some bitterness). It also removes moisture so that your dressing maintains more of its intensity. Watery slaw is a bummer. You can go overboard here, so don't let it sit too long and don't squeeze the be-geez out of it. I find that about an hour, occasionally squeezed gently along the way (and drained), does the trick.

    As for onion, I think it's one of those things that when it's applied correctly, you don't necessarily notice it but when it's not there, you definitely notice that something's missing. I grate it really finely, so that it basically becomes a juice because pieces of onion in slaw is not what I'd want. I've never tried subbing granulated onion but it might also work.

    Okay, one additional suggestion, even though I generally like to avoid relying on any specific brands when making recipes. Bragg's unfiltered apple cider vinegar is really nice. It's definitely got some sweet but it's also nicely balanced and the flavor is great. I find that it plays really well in slaw. Again, I don't like sweet slaws but I think some inherent sweetness is needed in cabbage-based slaws to offset the bitterness. The Bragg's fills that void nicely.

    Anna, you clearly can cook, so it's probably not helpful for me to say this but I'll say it anyway, trust your palate. Make your dressing first, taste it, dip some cabbage in it and see what you think. Whatever you do, once you come up with something you like, please report back. I'm confident that if you like it, I'm going to like it, and I'll want to make it, too.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #4 - June 2nd, 2021, 1:40 pm
    Post #4 - June 2nd, 2021, 1:40 pm Post #4 - June 2nd, 2021, 1:40 pm
    =R=

    You gonna make us beg. Or are you going to lay out your magic slaw recipe for us to fuck up then complain and criticize.

    XXOOXX
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #5 - June 2nd, 2021, 2:55 pm
    Post #5 - June 2nd, 2021, 2:55 pm Post #5 - June 2nd, 2021, 2:55 pm
    G Wiv wrote:=R=

    You gonna make us beg. Or are you going to lay out your magic slaw recipe for us to fuck up then complain and criticize.

    XXOOXX

    LOL! Spoken like a true cookbook author! :lol:

    I'm happy to share but Anna mentioned she wanted a vinegary slaw and while mine does have some vinegar, it's more mayo-based than anything else. So, I thought I'd let others chime in first. Also, other than the amount of salt (and by extension, the net weight of the cabbage), I've never measured a single component of my slaw. It's all just a bunch of toss-ins. I'll circle back shortly to fill in the blanks. :)

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #6 - June 2nd, 2021, 3:30 pm
    Post #6 - June 2nd, 2021, 3:30 pm Post #6 - June 2nd, 2021, 3:30 pm
    I'm really fond of the Spicy Slaw in Gary's book "Low and Slow". It's moderately spicy, very garlicky. It tends to get a little soupy, but Ronnie's salt-first approach might prevent that.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #7 - June 2nd, 2021, 3:57 pm
    Post #7 - June 2nd, 2021, 3:57 pm Post #7 - June 2nd, 2021, 3:57 pm
    I agree with ronnie's technique on salting. I *always* salt the cut cabbage before going on with whatever recipe I go with. For me, that's the most important step. The full breakdown on the technique is here:

    https://www.seriouseats.com/the-food-la ... -cole-slaw

    That is for creamy coleslaw, but you can use the technique for non-creamy cole slaw. I personally just go simple with cabbage, carrot, and red onion, and make a salt-and-vinegar dressing with some mustard to help emulsify and give a little extra flavor and a little bit of sugar to cut some of the sharpness. Unfortunately, I don't have a recipe, I always wing it. Oh, and celery seed. I almost always add celery seed, though I have used Old Bay in a pinch if I don't have celery seeds around (but then you have to adjust a bit on the salt.)
  • Post #8 - June 2nd, 2021, 5:24 pm
    Post #8 - June 2nd, 2021, 5:24 pm Post #8 - June 2nd, 2021, 5:24 pm
    I hate to sound like 1992, but one of the things cilantro goes great in, is slaw.

    Real mayo (not Miracle goo, or any of that sugary Marzetti dessert liquid slaw dressing,) a touch of plain ass white vinegar, a few dashes of celery seed, or celery salt, garlic powder, onion powder, salt& fresh pepper of course.

    I like to make it a good while before serving for ingredients to meld and cabbage to weep.

    I never do vinegar based at home, tho I do like it if it's not full of sugar.

    Sweet salads just creep me out. Slaw and tater salad are major offenders. I always make the Mrs taste test first. Oh happy day when in new surroundings for a meal (usually cookouts or a new bbq joint,) and the slaw and or tater salad is made with real mayo.
    We cannot be friends if you do not know the difference between Mayo and Miracle Whip.
  • Post #9 - June 2nd, 2021, 7:09 pm
    Post #9 - June 2nd, 2021, 7:09 pm Post #9 - June 2nd, 2021, 7:09 pm
    This is the recipe that I have been using for the past year or so:

    https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/23231 ... -coleslaw/
  • Post #10 - June 2nd, 2021, 11:29 pm
    Post #10 - June 2nd, 2021, 11:29 pm Post #10 - June 2nd, 2021, 11:29 pm
    I usually make 2 different kinds to accommodate the locals' preferences: The Lady's Coleslaw from The Lady and Sons Savannah Country Cookbook using grated cabbage and carrot, and the vinegar slaw from The St. Paul Farmer's Market Cookbook using shredded cabbage.

    I sort of wing the measurements and have slightly modified the recipes:
    The Lady's Coleslaw
    1/2 small head finely grated cabbage
    1 small peeled grated carrot
    1/4 c mayonnaise
    1/2 Tbsp cider vinegar
    1 Tbsp sugar
    1/2 tsp salt
    few grinds pepper
    1 tsp lemon juice

    Vinegar Slaw
    1/2 small head coarsely shredded cabbage, as for kraut
    1/3 c sugar
    1/3 c cider vinegar
    3 Tbsp water
    1 tsp olive oil
    1/2 tsp celery seed
    1/2 tsp salt

    For both, I make the slaw the morning before eating so the salt and sugar have a chance to do their osmotic jobs. Both keep for several days and may even be better the second day than the first.
  • Post #11 - June 4th, 2021, 1:15 pm
    Post #11 - June 4th, 2021, 1:15 pm Post #11 - June 4th, 2021, 1:15 pm
    With a big caveat that I've never once measured anything when making this, here's a take on slaw that's become a favorite around here:

    1kg finely-cut or shredded green cabbage
    1 grated carrot (optional, adds a nice color but not much else)
    1.5% kosher salt (1.5%, by weight, of total vegetable weight)

    Place cabbage (and carrot) in a large bowl and sprinkle with salt evenly over it. Mix well and let sit for 30 minutes. After 30 minutes, use your hands to squeeze the mixture gently and drain off excess moisture. Let sit another 30 minutes and squeeze it again. You can repeat this process as many times as you want but after a while, it's diminishing returns, because even though you can continue to remove moisture, the texture of the cabbage may degrade more than you want it to.

    While the cabbage is draining, make the dressing (I usually end up with 1.5 - 2 cups):

    2 big blobs Hellman's mayonnaise
    1 tiny blob of Kewpie or Sir Kensington's mayo (optional)
    1/2 sweet onion, finely grated into pulp/juice
    1 small squirt Plochman's yellow mustard
    1 generous splash Bragg's unfiltered apple cider vinegar
    1 small splash 'regular' apple cider vinegar
    1 small squeeze Tupelo honey*
    Freshly ground black pepper to taste
    Celery seed to taste
    NO MORE SALT (if you pre-salted, you won't need to add any more salt)
    *Use whatever honey you like. I use Tupelo because it doesn't crystalize and the flavor is fairly neutral.

    Mix all this together. The goal here is to create a fairly thick dressing that will cling to the cabbage and not run off. So, you'll need to find a balance between the thicker and thinner ingredients that also tastes good to you. This is where the yellow mustard comes in handy. It's acidic like the vinegars but unlike the vinegars, it also has cling power. So does the honey but if you use too much of that you'll be sorry. Once you get the dressing where you like it, dip some cabbage in and taste it. Adjust accordingly and refrigerate.

    Once the cabbage is drained to your liking, add all the dressing to the bowl and mix everything together. Move to a storage container if desired but either way, cover and refrigerate your slaw.

    This has about a 1-week life span. Day 1 is pretty good. Days 2, 3, and 4 are usually very good. After that, it'll start to diminish a bit but it can sometimes be resuscitated along the way with additional squirts of yellow mustard.

    =R=

    re: specific brands . . . these are not necessarily recommendations; just listing what I use.
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain

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