LTH Home

Food shortages -- in the US?

Food shortages -- in the US?
  • Forum HomePost Reply BackTop
    Page 3 of 3 
  • Post #61 - November 5th, 2021, 3:38 pm
    Post #61 - November 5th, 2021, 3:38 pm Post #61 - November 5th, 2021, 3:38 pm
    http://www.smalldeadanimals.com/2021/11/05/reader-survey-shortages-in-canada-and-the-us/

    SDA Reader Survey: Shortages in Canada (And The US)
    This amazing thread was open for Canadians (and some Americans!) to tell what they are unable to buy now. Appliances, parts for cars, car tires, all sorts of interim products made of metal, wood and wood products, furniture, spare parts for all kinds of things! It goes far past griping about the price of beef and pork or the missing Oreos or ingredients for your Thanksgiving meal. What a round-up!
  • Post #62 - November 5th, 2021, 3:39 pm
    Post #62 - November 5th, 2021, 3:39 pm Post #62 - November 5th, 2021, 3:39 pm
    Let them eat cake! ha ha ha

    The AP tells us that "Rising baguette price fears are putting French in a crunch."
    "A hike in the cost of wheat is alarming French households who fear a possible rise in the price of the prized baguette, seen by many as a barometer of the country's economic health. Many boulangeries around France are putting up signs, warning customers that the long crunchy staple could be going up in price by 4 to 6 cents, from its average of just over $1. 'Although that might not seem like a lot, it's a huge increase. The baguette is precious. It has only gone up 23 centimes (about 28 cents) in the last 20 years.' said Dominique Anract, president of the French Confederation of Bakeries and Pastry Shops."

    The article then tells us that the bread crunch is linked to a 30% worldwide increase since September in the price of wheat after bad harvests in Russia.

    Fortunately, we are told, "In the Revolution, there was a penury of bread, there was not enough of it. It wasn't about the price of bread. We're not at that stage....yet!"
  • Post #63 - November 5th, 2021, 4:50 pm
    Post #63 - November 5th, 2021, 4:50 pm Post #63 - November 5th, 2021, 4:50 pm
    Joy wrote:The article then tells us that the bread crunch is linked to a 30% worldwide increase since September in the price of wheat after bad harvests in Russia.

    Fortunately, we are told, "In the Revolution, there was a penury of bread, there was not enough of it. It wasn't about the price of bread. We're not at that stage....yet!"

    A bad harvest in Russia affect's prices in France and the world, unbelievable. USSR was always importing wheat, so I doubt this is the issue.

    The price of a kilo basic brown bread was steady 10 kopeks. Yet a kilo of cookies could cost a Rouble or more. In the USSR, the price of bread was very, very sensitive politically.

    The people wasted bread, because it was so cheap. If you fed a pig any leftover bread, you could go to jail.

    I have a Soviet era poster that states, "Bread is labor!"

    I just told my Dad this news about Russian crop failures affecting world wide prices. It was greatly amusing.

    Regards,
    CAthy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #64 - November 5th, 2021, 9:26 pm
    Post #64 - November 5th, 2021, 9:26 pm Post #64 - November 5th, 2021, 9:26 pm
    Russia is now the world's leading exporter of wheat.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #65 - November 5th, 2021, 10:23 pm
    Post #65 - November 5th, 2021, 10:23 pm Post #65 - November 5th, 2021, 10:23 pm
    Katie wrote:Russia is now the world's leading exporter of wheat.

    Quite impressive turn around when you consider:
    Starting in the 1960s, the USSR was a net grain importer. For example, in 1963, it bought 10.4 million tons of grain and 2.1 million tons of flour from the U.S. Furthermore, the amount of imports gradually increased:
    -in 1972, grain imports amounted to 23 million tons;
    -in 1975, to 27 million tons;
    -in 1979, to 31 million tons;
    -in 1980, to 43 million tons.

    The record-high amount of grain imports was recorded in 1985, when the USSR had to purchase 47 million tons.


    Good for them!
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast

Contact

About

Team

Advertize

Close

Chat

Articles

Guide

Events

more