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Food shortages -- in the US?

Food shortages -- in the US?
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  • Post #61 - November 5th, 2021, 3:38 pm
    Post #61 - November 5th, 2021, 3:38 pm Post #61 - November 5th, 2021, 3:38 pm
    http://www.smalldeadanimals.com/2021/11/05/reader-survey-shortages-in-canada-and-the-us/

    SDA Reader Survey: Shortages in Canada (And The US)
    This amazing thread was open for Canadians (and some Americans!) to tell what they are unable to buy now. Appliances, parts for cars, car tires, all sorts of interim products made of metal, wood and wood products, furniture, spare parts for all kinds of things! It goes far past griping about the price of beef and pork or the missing Oreos or ingredients for your Thanksgiving meal. What a round-up!
  • Post #62 - November 5th, 2021, 3:39 pm
    Post #62 - November 5th, 2021, 3:39 pm Post #62 - November 5th, 2021, 3:39 pm
    Let them eat cake! ha ha ha

    The AP tells us that "Rising baguette price fears are putting French in a crunch."
    "A hike in the cost of wheat is alarming French households who fear a possible rise in the price of the prized baguette, seen by many as a barometer of the country's economic health. Many boulangeries around France are putting up signs, warning customers that the long crunchy staple could be going up in price by 4 to 6 cents, from its average of just over $1. 'Although that might not seem like a lot, it's a huge increase. The baguette is precious. It has only gone up 23 centimes (about 28 cents) in the last 20 years.' said Dominique Anract, president of the French Confederation of Bakeries and Pastry Shops."

    The article then tells us that the bread crunch is linked to a 30% worldwide increase since September in the price of wheat after bad harvests in Russia.

    Fortunately, we are told, "In the Revolution, there was a penury of bread, there was not enough of it. It wasn't about the price of bread. We're not at that stage....yet!"
  • Post #63 - November 5th, 2021, 4:50 pm
    Post #63 - November 5th, 2021, 4:50 pm Post #63 - November 5th, 2021, 4:50 pm
    Joy wrote:The article then tells us that the bread crunch is linked to a 30% worldwide increase since September in the price of wheat after bad harvests in Russia.

    Fortunately, we are told, "In the Revolution, there was a penury of bread, there was not enough of it. It wasn't about the price of bread. We're not at that stage....yet!"

    A bad harvest in Russia affect's prices in France and the world, unbelievable. USSR was always importing wheat, so I doubt this is the issue.

    The price of a kilo basic brown bread was steady 10 kopeks. Yet a kilo of cookies could cost a Rouble or more. In the USSR, the price of bread was very, very sensitive politically.

    The people wasted bread, because it was so cheap. If you fed a pig any leftover bread, you could go to jail.

    I have a Soviet era poster that states, "Bread is labor!"

    I just told my Dad this news about Russian crop failures affecting world wide prices. It was greatly amusing.

    Regards,
    CAthy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #64 - November 5th, 2021, 9:26 pm
    Post #64 - November 5th, 2021, 9:26 pm Post #64 - November 5th, 2021, 9:26 pm
    Russia is now the world's leading exporter of wheat.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #65 - November 5th, 2021, 10:23 pm
    Post #65 - November 5th, 2021, 10:23 pm Post #65 - November 5th, 2021, 10:23 pm
    Katie wrote:Russia is now the world's leading exporter of wheat.

    Quite impressive turn around when you consider:
    Starting in the 1960s, the USSR was a net grain importer. For example, in 1963, it bought 10.4 million tons of grain and 2.1 million tons of flour from the U.S. Furthermore, the amount of imports gradually increased:
    -in 1972, grain imports amounted to 23 million tons;
    -in 1975, to 27 million tons;
    -in 1979, to 31 million tons;
    -in 1980, to 43 million tons.

    The record-high amount of grain imports was recorded in 1985, when the USSR had to purchase 47 million tons.


    Good for them!
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #66 - December 21st, 2021, 3:40 pm
    Post #66 - December 21st, 2021, 3:40 pm Post #66 - December 21st, 2021, 3:40 pm
    Yes, Candy Canes Are Also Harder to Find This Year

    https://www.foodandwine.com/news/candy- ... rtage-2021
    Never order barbecue in a place that also serves quiche - Lewis Grizzard
  • Post #67 - January 4th, 2022, 1:54 pm
    Post #67 - January 4th, 2022, 1:54 pm Post #67 - January 4th, 2022, 1:54 pm
    Our local appliance store has had very little in stock for awhile now, they have floor models but everything is on back order, mostly with no delivery date listed.

    I had to laugh at the comment upthread about Whole Foods being understocked. In my recent experience (since the Amazon purchase) they're always understocked.
  • Post #68 - January 15th, 2022, 7:39 pm
    Post #68 - January 15th, 2022, 7:39 pm Post #68 - January 15th, 2022, 7:39 pm
    Bare shelves at supermarkets are attributed to omicron, a labor shortage, climate change and other reasons. "We're really seeing the perfect storm," one industry expert told NPR.
    https://www.npr.org/2022/01/12/10724624 ... pad&f=1053
    Never order barbecue in a place that also serves quiche - Lewis Grizzard
  • Post #69 - January 15th, 2022, 8:14 pm
    Post #69 - January 15th, 2022, 8:14 pm Post #69 - January 15th, 2022, 8:14 pm
    I tried 5 different grocery stores in the area and every one said that they had not received a shipment of frozen phyllo dough for several weeks.
  • Post #70 - January 15th, 2022, 8:24 pm
    Post #70 - January 15th, 2022, 8:24 pm Post #70 - January 15th, 2022, 8:24 pm
    lougord99 wrote:I tried 5 different grocery stores in the area and every one said that they had not received a shipment of frozen phyllo dough for several weeks.

    Fresh Farms in Wheeling had some last week. I don’t recall the brand.
    Never order barbecue in a place that also serves quiche - Lewis Grizzard
  • Post #71 - January 15th, 2022, 10:13 pm
    Post #71 - January 15th, 2022, 10:13 pm Post #71 - January 15th, 2022, 10:13 pm
    What's interesting to me is the stocks of these publicly traded grocery stores are all close to there 52 wk highs than than lows including Kroger (KR), Albertsons (ACI), Sprouts Farmers Market (SFM), Walmart (WMT). I wonder if they use the excuse of supply chain, labor, and the pandemic issues to raise prices on staples like paper towels/toilet paper, meat, and dairy products.

    From articles I've read the farmers are not making more money and so the producers/distributers are the ones raising the prices especially on meat products.
  • Post #72 - January 16th, 2022, 9:30 am
    Post #72 - January 16th, 2022, 9:30 am Post #72 - January 16th, 2022, 9:30 am
    Dave148 wrote:Fresh Farms in Wheeling had some last week. I don’t recall the brand.

    Thank you, they had it. I have never been to that store. It is a nice one.
  • Post #73 - January 16th, 2022, 12:32 pm
    Post #73 - January 16th, 2022, 12:32 pm Post #73 - January 16th, 2022, 12:32 pm
    Interesting article on bloomberg with Target Corp CEO in which he said he sees Fewer Store Trips as Shoppers Confront Inflation in 2022. Shoppers will eat more at home and seek out more generic brand alternatives.

    Shoppers are also likely to eat more at home and seek cheaper generic-brand goods in an effort to ease the blow from rising prices, Chief Executive Officer Brian Cornell said Sunday at a National Retail Federation event in New York. Consumer prices jumped 7% last year, the fastest 12-month pace since mid-1982, according to Labor Department data released last week.
    “Some of the historical ways consumers react to inflation will play out again in 2022,” Cornell said. “You’ll drive fewer miles, you’ll consolidate the number of times and locations where you shop. You’ll probably spend a little more eating at home versus your favorite restaurant, and you might make some trade-offs between a national brand and an own brand.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles ... -inflation

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