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Pumpkin butter

Pumpkin butter
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  • Pumpkin butter

    Post #1 - September 30th, 2021, 9:06 pm
    Post #1 - September 30th, 2021, 9:06 pm Post #1 - September 30th, 2021, 9:06 pm
    Does anyone have a good recipe for pumpkin butter made from a fresh pumpkin?

    Also can this be processed in a boiling water bath to preserve it?
    I know pumpkin is not very acidic

    Thanks
    "If you reject the food, ignore the customs, fear the religion and avoid the people, you might better stay home."
    ~James Michener
  • Post #2 - September 30th, 2021, 9:58 pm
    Post #2 - September 30th, 2021, 9:58 pm Post #2 - September 30th, 2021, 9:58 pm
    National Center for Home Food Preservation

    Canning pumpkin butter or mashed or pureed pumpkin is NOT recommended.
    Home canning is not recommended for pumpkin butter or any mashed or pureed pumpkin or winter squash. In 1989, the USDA's Extension Service first published the Complete Guide to Home Canning that remains the basis of Extension recommendations today, found in the December 2009 revision. The only directions for canning pumpkin and winter squash are for cubed flesh. In fact, the directions for preparing the product include the statement, "Caution: Do not mash or puree."


    Regards,
    CAthy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #3 - October 1st, 2021, 5:54 pm
    Post #3 - October 1st, 2021, 5:54 pm Post #3 - October 1st, 2021, 5:54 pm
    Thanks Cathy
    The recipes I have seen say to freeze it
    I didn’t know if sugaring it up made it more stable
    Apparently not...
    E
    "If you reject the food, ignore the customs, fear the religion and avoid the people, you might better stay home."
    ~James Michener
  • Post #4 - October 1st, 2021, 6:40 pm
    Post #4 - October 1st, 2021, 6:40 pm Post #4 - October 1st, 2021, 6:40 pm
    Hi, I make pumpkin butter every once in awhile from a recipe I obtained from the Azalea Inn in Savanna, GA many years ago. It calls for canned pumpkin though. Just chiming in to say that it freezes very well! (Also pairs very well with their beer bread).
  • Post #5 - October 2nd, 2021, 9:22 pm
    Post #5 - October 2nd, 2021, 9:22 pm Post #5 - October 2nd, 2021, 9:22 pm
    Lynne
    Can you post your recipe?
    Thanks
    Elaine
    "If you reject the food, ignore the customs, fear the religion and avoid the people, you might better stay home."
    ~James Michener
  • Post #6 - October 3rd, 2021, 7:05 am
    Post #6 - October 3rd, 2021, 7:05 am Post #6 - October 3rd, 2021, 7:05 am
    Sure, Elaine.

    I couldn’t find it online so I don’t know if they’ve copyrighted it or not. It was given to us when we checked out of the b & b many years ago. I will give the list of ingredients and my version of instructions. It’s very simple.

    Pumpkin Butter:
    1# butter
    29 ounces canned pumpkin
    1 cup sugar
    3 Tablespoons cinnamon
    Melt the butter in a large pot. Add the rest of the ingredients and mix well. Cook over medium heat for about 10 minutes until everything is blended together. Pour into small tupperware containers and let cool. Freeze.

    Beer Bread:
    3 cups self-rising flour
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon baking powder
    1 can cheap beer
    1 cup sugar
    Mix everything together gently. Place in a greased loaf pan. Bake at 375 degrees for 1 hour. Serve toasted with pumpkin butter.

    Azalea Inn
    217 East Huntingdon Street, Savannah, Georgia 31401
    https://azaleainn.com/
  • Post #7 - October 8th, 2021, 1:23 pm
    Post #7 - October 8th, 2021, 1:23 pm Post #7 - October 8th, 2021, 1:23 pm
    Chef John just posted his recipe for pumpkin butter...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZtbXrPCrXGo
    Cookingblahg.blogspot.com
  • Post #8 - October 12th, 2021, 9:38 am
    Post #8 - October 12th, 2021, 9:38 am Post #8 - October 12th, 2021, 9:38 am
    About 10 years ago, I decided to develop a pumpkin custard. All of the recipes I found utilized mashed pumpkin pulp; not the silky custard texture I was looking for.
    I experimented juicing a pumpkin and that was a wonderful discovery. Every year I find a larger pumpkin with a high sugar content. A fairytale is a good choice and easily found.
    I run the pumpkin through the juicer and toss the pulp. The juice is strained through a chinois and brought to a simmer in a sauce pan. It is important to skim the surface to remove pulp.
    Use your own taste buds for the amount of reduction; reducing to one third of the original content reveals a silky and sweet pumpkin flavor.
    The juice may be then used to make egg nog, ice cream, creme caramel, creme brulee,
    creme anglaise or any baked custard. The results will have wonderful pumpkin flavor and a silky custard texture.
  • Post #9 - October 12th, 2021, 9:58 am
    Post #9 - October 12th, 2021, 9:58 am Post #9 - October 12th, 2021, 9:58 am
    GReat idea, Tim!

    You can still get some life out of the squash. This is from a Cook's Illustrated email from this morning:
    Many vegetable soup recipes rely on chicken broth, dairy, and spices to enhance flavor, but this can overpower the flavors of the vegetables. We prefer a technique used for making stock: using vegetable seeds, peels, and trimmings to preserve and highlight the vegetable flavors. To create a flavorful stock base, we use whole vegetables and puree the soft-cooked scraps. Depending on the vegetables you’re using, sautéing the seeds can create a more potent base. You can use this technique for nonpureed soups as well.
    To use squash seeds and fibers:
    1. Quarter unpeeled squash and remove seeds and fibers. Sauté seeds and fibers with fat and aromatics in Dutch oven.
    2. Steam squash in steamer set right in pot. When squash is tender, remove from pot, let cool, and scrape flesh from skin using soupspoon.
    3. Strain cooking liquid from pot through fine-mesh strainer into large measuring cup. In batches, process cooked squash with strained liquid in blender until smooth.
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #10 - October 12th, 2021, 12:47 pm
    Post #10 - October 12th, 2021, 12:47 pm Post #10 - October 12th, 2021, 12:47 pm
    I would think that a high-speed blender and straining would give you more pumpkin flavor than just juice -- it won't be stringy but it might not be silky either.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang

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