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Coq au Vin with Actual Coq

Coq au Vin with Actual Coq
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  • Coq au Vin with Actual Coq

    Post #1 - January 30th, 2022, 10:56 am
    Post #1 - January 30th, 2022, 10:56 am Post #1 - January 30th, 2022, 10:56 am
    We’ve been making coq au vin for decades, following many different recipes. In some cases, it seemed like we were being directed to cook the chicken for way longer than was necessary.

    As the name of the dish suggests, at some point, a “coq,” or rooster, was likely involved. I believe the prescribed longer cooking time is due to the need to roast or braise the tough old roosters for a good long while to render the chewy meat edible – such a long cook seems excessive for more tender chicken, and overcooking chicken may, ironically, make it as tough as a lean, well-exercised rooster.

    Because of its legendary toughness, rooster meat needs a long time to marinate and cook. Still, I wanted to give it a shot. But where to find a rooster, an actual and fully featured male fowl, not a capon, the castrated version of same?

    Calling a few places looking for uncastrated rooster was turning up nothing. Then I called Slagel Farms and talked to LouisJohn Slagel who said, “we have a few roosters wandering around over here; you can have one of those.” He seemed almost eager to sell one to me.

    When you think about it, it’s clear why farmers might want to unload roosters: chicken farmers really need only one stud bird for a barnyard harem of lady fowl, and given a normal birth rate, that means about half the birds born will be male. Roosters are notorious pains in the ass: aggressive, prone to fight with their fellows, sometimes even attacking their human caregivers/executioners. Who want’s ‘em? I do! Or, at least, one…

    So, talking to LouisJohn, I arranged to have Slagel drop off a rooster at Carnival, a local Oak Park market, this coming Wednesday. It will run me $20, and I honestly have no idea what the weight of this tough old bird will be. I’m guessing Slagel will look over his lot of roosters, pick the biggest pain in the ass, and chop off that bird’s red-combed and wattled head,

    I was talking with Chef Cedric Hardin, who served us coq au vin last week at River Roast, and he said he marinates his chickens for three days in red wine, which seems way over the top, but his bird was good and juicy. So, I’m thinking I’ll give my rooster at least two days (and maybe more) in a red Rhone before adding pearl mushrooms, etc., and making my coq au vin.

    I’d be interested in knowing if anyone here has experience with cooking rooster. I need all the help I can get.

    I do hope you appreciate that in this post I didn’t go for any cute double entendre (it would have been way too easy).
    "Don't you ever underestimate the power of a female." Bootsy Collins
  • Post #2 - January 30th, 2022, 12:08 pm
    Post #2 - January 30th, 2022, 12:08 pm Post #2 - January 30th, 2022, 12:08 pm
    I have no experience with cooking rooster, but will be following this with great interest!
    -Mary
  • Post #3 - January 30th, 2022, 2:25 pm
    Post #3 - January 30th, 2022, 2:25 pm Post #3 - January 30th, 2022, 2:25 pm
    This is amazing. I'll be following with great interest. Made a batch of turkey "chili" yesterday with cheap turkey bones from Carnival (for the base broth made in an Instant Pot) and two packs of Slagel ground turkey. We're eating it for dinner tonight but I tasted it last night and it was quite good. I love being able to grab cheap turkey bones reliably from a place that I can walk to.
  • Post #4 - January 30th, 2022, 3:30 pm
    Post #4 - January 30th, 2022, 3:30 pm Post #4 - January 30th, 2022, 3:30 pm
    Coq au vin has been a sentimental favorite of mine ever since my high school French class had a field trip downtown to see a movie and then eat coq au vin at a French restaurant.

    The movie was François Truffaut's L'Homme qui aimait les femmes (The Man Who Loved Women), which I recapped at dinner. My father was amused and my mother was appalled --- I wonder if she thought about calling the principal the next day.

    I've never had a chance to buy a real rooster for coq au vin, though, just capon. $20 seems to me a very reasonable price. I'd pay that if I could get one closer to where I am (hmm, maybe through Homestead Meats in Evanston; they sell Slagel Farm products). Maybe Slagel could unload other pain-in-the-neck roosters as "perfect for coq au vin!" at some summer farmers' markets.

    So I am very curious to hear how this experiment works out for you!

    I wouldn't bother with marinading longer than overnight--if even that. Most recipes I looked at today don't include marinating -- although those are for young chicken pieces, not capons and certainly not roosters.

    I have a handy little book by Julia Child called Julia's Kitchen Wisdom that is more a set of master recipes and their variations than a collection of stand-alone recipes. In that book, she presents beef bourguignon as the master recipe for braising and beef daube, coq au vin, and chicken fricasee as variations. She doesn't call for marinating for any of them.

    I've mentioned before in the Julia Child thread my favorite moment in her French Chef series (available on YouTube), which involved her cooking coq au vin and chicken fricassee side-by-side in electric tabletop covered cookers. In a preceding video clip she explains, with plenty of plucked props on hand, about roosters, capons, and other sizes and types of chickens.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #5 - January 30th, 2022, 3:59 pm
    Post #5 - January 30th, 2022, 3:59 pm Post #5 - January 30th, 2022, 3:59 pm
    Katie wrote: I've never had a chance to buy a real rooster for coq au vin, though, just capon. $20 seems to me a very reasonable price. I'd pay that if I could get one closer to where I am (hmm, maybe through Homestead Meats in Evanston; they sell Slagel Farm products). Maybe Slagel could unload other pain-in-the-neck roosters as "perfect for coq au vin!" at some summer farmers' markets.

    So I am very curious to hear how this experiment works out for you!

    I wouldn't bother with marinading longer than overnight--if even that. Most recipes I looked at today don't include marinating -- although those are for young chicken pieces, not capons and certainly not roosters.


    Mr. Slagel told me that they could easily arrange for a pickup at Publican Quality Meats or Fresh Farms -- they were dropping off the bird for me at Carnival as a favor (I have to meet the delivery guys there at noon as Slagel didn't want to ask the store to bother with it).

    I've never marinated coq au vin before, but since Chef Harden said he did it, and his version was very good, I thought I'd give it a shot. I've recently read several recipes that recommend using a whole bottle of red wine as marinade for a single chicken...and I just picked up a reasonably priced Cote du Rhone for that use (and another to sip upon while I cook dinner).

    I will definitely report back on the results.

    PS. I remember seeing Truffaut's "The Man Who Love Women" when it came out -- though I did miss the Burt Reynold's vehicle of the same name which came out just a few years afterwards.
    "Don't you ever underestimate the power of a female." Bootsy Collins
  • Post #6 - January 30th, 2022, 7:52 pm
    Post #6 - January 30th, 2022, 7:52 pm Post #6 - January 30th, 2022, 7:52 pm
    By coincidence, this evening we happened to catch Mary Berry on tv making coq au vin at some Downton Abbey-like huge castle in England, called a "country house." This was between the two football games so quite a contrast.

    This was the last (I think) episode of a series where Mary visited great houses in England and cooked various dishes while touring the art collection, finding the secret button that opens the invisible door in the wall that leads to the staircase to the hidden wine cellar. She also made an amazing four layer cake with strawberries and lemon creme that was served after the cricket game. In each episode, she would cook at least four different things, only one of which was a baked dessert.

    I have never been a big fan of coq au vin but Mary's looked fantastic!

    The name of the series is Mary Berry's Country House Secrets so if PBS replays it, I recommend recording the whole series, if you enjoy that kind of thing!

    And best of luck to the rooster cookers!
  • Post #7 - January 31st, 2022, 11:18 am
    Post #7 - January 31st, 2022, 11:18 am Post #7 - January 31st, 2022, 11:18 am
    The live chicken place on Fullerton/Austin probably has or can get you roosters.*

    I've never made a rooster, but I've made, with mixed success, poule au pot with a hen.

    *Across the street is Riis Park, which has a nice little pond/nature spot with some interesting things--once saw a 50lb+ snap turtle in the pond. There are usually ducks, and while most are mallards, there are usually a few white, what I refer to as the chavalston the duck kinda duck. Well, my daughter's theory is the white ducks are all escapee's from the live poultry place across the street.
    Think Yiddish, Dress British - Advice of Evil Ronnie to me.
  • Post #8 - January 31st, 2022, 12:17 pm
    Post #8 - January 31st, 2022, 12:17 pm Post #8 - January 31st, 2022, 12:17 pm
    My lack of enthusiasm for long marinating of chicken in red wine probably has to do with the purplish color the meat takes on. There's always the coq au reisling option if you want to avoid that.


    (edit: marinading-->marinating)
    Last edited by Katie on February 1st, 2022, 6:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #9 - January 31st, 2022, 12:49 pm
    Post #9 - January 31st, 2022, 12:49 pm Post #9 - January 31st, 2022, 12:49 pm
    When my farmer friend has old laying hens, he sells them to me for Coq au Vin and my wife's Chicken and Dumplings.
    She claims and is correct in that you cannot get the correct flavor of the chicken and dumplings her grandmother used to make without these hens whose time has passed.
    I have not asked him for a Rooster.....yet!!!
    Note that these hens are free to roam in the barnyard and are not caged which has a lot to do with the toughness of the bird.
    These are not the Roasters that also raises.
    -Richard
  • Post #10 - January 31st, 2022, 1:31 pm
    Post #10 - January 31st, 2022, 1:31 pm Post #10 - January 31st, 2022, 1:31 pm
    I have heard somewhere that most of the coqs in France are actually old laying hens. I think the big thing is having older tougher meat to braise rather than whether they (ever) had a pair.

    -Will
  • Post #11 - January 31st, 2022, 1:36 pm
    Post #11 - January 31st, 2022, 1:36 pm Post #11 - January 31st, 2022, 1:36 pm
    If you like the rooster, then perhaps Cock-a-leekie could come next.

    A remarkably large number of dishes rely on rooster -- largely because no one wanted too many roosters -- they're noisy (which is why they were once banned on the island of Sybaris) and they fight -- just keep enough to keep the hens happy. Plus it is only recently, historically speaking, that we've had enough fowl to be able to dispose of one gender.

    So definitely looking forward to hearing about your foray into historic dining.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #12 - January 31st, 2022, 4:35 pm
    Post #12 - January 31st, 2022, 4:35 pm Post #12 - January 31st, 2022, 4:35 pm
    WillG wrote: I think the big thing is having older tougher meat to braise rather than whether they (ever) had a pair.

    Logo line!!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #13 - January 31st, 2022, 9:18 pm
    Post #13 - January 31st, 2022, 9:18 pm Post #13 - January 31st, 2022, 9:18 pm
    Vital Information wrote:The live chicken place on Fullerton/Austin probably has or can get you roosters.*



    I was going to try that place, but I couldn't remember the cross-street with Austin, but thanks, now I know.
    "Don't you ever underestimate the power of a female." Bootsy Collins
  • Post #14 - February 1st, 2022, 5:39 am
    Post #14 - February 1st, 2022, 5:39 am Post #14 - February 1st, 2022, 5:39 am
    I doubt if John's Live Poultry will have an actual Rooster.
    But you can always use a Capon, an oft forgotten bird!
    I think I have seen Capon's for sale at Fresh Farms.
  • Post #15 - February 1st, 2022, 10:50 am
    Post #15 - February 1st, 2022, 10:50 am Post #15 - February 1st, 2022, 10:50 am
    Cynthia wrote:If you like the rooster, then perhaps Cock-a-leekie could come next.


    Rooster meat in soup sounds like a very good idea, which reminds me, as I journey through the neglected meats of the world, that traditional Scottish Broth is high on my list of foods to make this winter, and I intend to take on mutton after the rooster. I used to enjoy Campbell's Scotch (sic) Broth as a kid, but when I tried it later in life, it lacked something: mutton. As we've all come to rely more on synthetics, sheep don't get a chance to grow old (and yield their wool) before we eat them, so there's less available mutton.

    I do have one source for the mutton, Nea Agora on Taylor, though they usually require purchases in large quantities, so I will probably look for other places where I can buy just four or five pounds or so of old sheep meat for my Scottish Broth.
    "Don't you ever underestimate the power of a female." Bootsy Collins
  • Post #16 - February 1st, 2022, 11:04 am
    Post #16 - February 1st, 2022, 11:04 am Post #16 - February 1st, 2022, 11:04 am
    David Hammond wrote:other places where I can buy just four or five pounds or so of old sheep meat for my Scottish Broth.

    I'd start with one of the Halal butchers on Devon.

    Farm City Meat Halal

    YaSeen Zabiha Halal Meat

    Mehrab Zabiha Meat
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #17 - February 1st, 2022, 12:35 pm
    Post #17 - February 1st, 2022, 12:35 pm Post #17 - February 1st, 2022, 12:35 pm
    Katie wrote:My lack of enthusiasm for long marinading of chicken in red wine probably has to do with the purplish color the meat takes on. There's always the coq au reisling option if you want to avoid that.


    I don't have much of a preference, but red (specifically Burgundy) is, as far as I know, traditional, and Paul Bocuse uses it, but a more powerful rationale for using a red wine would be that the huskier flavor of the red would stand up to the stronger flavors of the old male bird. That said, if I get good at this, I'd definitely try a white.
    "Don't you ever underestimate the power of a female." Bootsy Collins
  • Post #18 - February 1st, 2022, 1:11 pm
    Post #18 - February 1st, 2022, 1:11 pm Post #18 - February 1st, 2022, 1:11 pm
    Hi,

    I haven't been in this place since they have reopened after closing briefly during the pandemic, but they used to carry roosters among other live creatures that they butcher for you on site...might be worth a call for the coq au vin recipe:

    Aden Live Poultry
    2731 W Lawrence Ave # 1
    Chicago, IL 60625
    (773) 275-1567
    United States
  • Post #19 - February 1st, 2022, 1:14 pm
    Post #19 - February 1st, 2022, 1:14 pm Post #19 - February 1st, 2022, 1:14 pm
    I wonder if John's would have one - I may just have to call...
  • Post #20 - February 1st, 2022, 5:23 pm
    Post #20 - February 1st, 2022, 5:23 pm Post #20 - February 1st, 2022, 5:23 pm
    Escoffier recognized that a rooster is a tough, tough bird without flavor. His recipe in Larrouse Gastronomy begins, "Cut up a young chicken."

    Julia's original recipe calls for a 2.5-3 lb. frying chicken. That means a Cornish Cross (i.e.: flavorless) chicken in the US.

    The very best chicken you can buy would be an air chilled heritage french slow growing chicken. The words "Air Chilled" are the most important. That means the chicken was not tossed into a pool of chlorinated water with hundreds of other chickens. Air chilled chicken are hung separately and moved to a cold room to drop their temperature to 26°F. The chickens never touch each other and do not absorb any of the chlorinated water.

    Heritage chickens have only recently entered the US market. These chicken are grown for about 84 days, twice as long as Cornish Cross chickens. The French Poulet Rouge Cu Nu naked neck "Air Chilled" chicken is available at Whole Foods. The price is a bargain.

    You may select a larger maybe 4 lb. chicken at the service counter or a smaller 3 lb. chicken cryovac'd in the display case.

    Tim
  • Post #21 - February 1st, 2022, 6:01 pm
    Post #21 - February 1st, 2022, 6:01 pm Post #21 - February 1st, 2022, 6:01 pm
    David Hammond wrote:
    Katie wrote:My lack of enthusiasm for long marinading of chicken in red wine probably has to do with the purplish color the meat takes on. There's always the coq au reisling option if you want to avoid that.

    I don't have much of a preference, but red (specifically Burgundy) is, as far as I know, traditional, and Paul Bocuse uses it, but a more powerful rationale for using a red wine would be that the huskier flavor of the red would stand up to the stronger flavors of the old male bird. That said, if I get good at this, I'd definitely try a white.

    Oh, I'm not discouraging the use of red wine---I certainly think that for this experiment you should follow the most traditional and knowledgeable guidance you can find. I'm looking forward to your results.

    Also, I don't doubt there's a difference in the flavor to the sauce using red versus white wine. Just wonder how much the tenderness of the meat improves (enough to justify the trade off with the purplish color effect?) with long marinating in wine if you're just using a regular whole chicken or capon or chicken parts. With a real rooster, does longer marinating improve the result? Seems like a question for Harold McGee.

    What little I know of the history suggests that coq au vin (made with red wine) is traditional in the central, e.g., Burgundy, region of France, whereas coq au riesling is traditional farther north, e.g., in the Alsace-Lorraine region where France meets Germany. Which is to say you make it with whatever wine is local.

    Also glad to see all the suggestions posted in this thread about where to potentially obtain appropriate chicken options to replicate this experiment.

    (p.s., I should have said "long marinating in red wine" above. Marinate is the verb; marinade is the noun. Did not know that.)
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #22 - February 1st, 2022, 8:14 pm
    Post #22 - February 1st, 2022, 8:14 pm Post #22 - February 1st, 2022, 8:14 pm
    Tim wrote:Heritage chickens have only recently entered the US market. These chicken are grown for about 84 days, twice as long as Cornish Cross chickens. The French Poulet Rouge Cu Nu naked neck "Air Chilled" chicken is available at Whole Foods.

    I don't understand that statement. I bought several heritage chickens 15 years ago ( around $40 per chicken at the time ). I decided they were not worth the money, but I think you could always get heritage chickens.
  • Post #23 - February 1st, 2022, 11:19 pm
    Post #23 - February 1st, 2022, 11:19 pm Post #23 - February 1st, 2022, 11:19 pm
    Hi,

    It may not exactly be suitable for this recipe, you may want to consider a mature duck.

    It is cheaper than duckling and was just a pill to deal with. I see from the thread I linked to, I never did update with my experience. While details may have faded somewhat from memory, I recall enough to decide it was not worth the investment in time and ingredients to do again.

    I wonder if there is much difference between a male or female mature chickens. I know a laying hen will produce for a few years. A friend who lives in the country sent her retired laying hens to her local agricultural auction.

    I wish Carolyn my best in her efforts to create something delicious, because I am fairly certain she will do the cooking and not you.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #24 - February 2nd, 2022, 7:50 am
    Post #24 - February 2nd, 2022, 7:50 am Post #24 - February 2nd, 2022, 7:50 am
    'Mature duck'?
    No!!!
    In France they raise a specific Bresse Chicken and it's got an Appellation.
    They won't make it over to the USA.
    There is money to be made in the 'Heritage' business in the USA and chickens are now included with the traditional French Tricolor markings.
    I seriously doubt they are anything other than the common US Chicken!!!!
    I will reiterate that the defunct laying hens come closest to what we are discussing. Sometimes labeled as 'Stewing' hens.
    As to Rooster availability, I would sure turn your live bird over and confirm it's a Rooster before purchasing and having it slaughtered.
    I will ask my farmer friend about the availability of a Rooster.
    As to air or water processing, my source processes with out any antiseptic wash and uses a horse trough fed by a well to chill overnight.
    I consider any commercial processing as subject to HAACP regulations and you should be able to find definitive information on the use of antiseptic and cleaning methods in the regulations.
    I have tried the air chilled birds and did not notice any quantifiable difference than any other commercial chicken.
    Frankly I am amazed by the quality and consistancy of our standard supermarket chicken.
  • Post #25 - February 2nd, 2022, 9:59 am
    Post #25 - February 2nd, 2022, 9:59 am Post #25 - February 2nd, 2022, 9:59 am
    Katie wrote:Also, I don't doubt there's a difference in the flavor to the sauce using red versus white wine. Just wonder how much the tenderness of the meat improves (enough to justify the trade off with the purplish color effect?) with long marinating in wine if you're just using a regular whole chicken or capon or chicken parts. With a real rooster, does longer marinating improve the result? Seems like a question for Harold McGee.


    Picked up my rooster from the good folks at Slagel (who I completely trust to properly label and handle the bird to at least industry standards, if not beyond). An aesthetic consideration in favor of red wine (aside from adding what I do believe will be more flavor than white wine) is that the red wine creates the "purplish color effect," and this rooster, as well as others I've seen photos of, seems slightly "discolored": tones of bluish browns and yellows, not quite appealing, so it almost seems desirable to "dye" the whole bird a kind of deep purple.

    Marination can change the flavor of whatever meat is marinated, of course, but the challenge will be to tread the line between enough/too much time in the marinade. Too little, and the process is practically pointless; too much, and the meat could become mushy. Current plan is to give the bird 48 hours or so in the marinade (which will be mirepoix -- onions, carrots, celery-- and red wine).
    "Don't you ever underestimate the power of a female." Bootsy Collins
  • Post #26 - February 2nd, 2022, 11:32 am
    Post #26 - February 2nd, 2022, 11:32 am Post #26 - February 2nd, 2022, 11:32 am
    "Heritage chickens have only recently entered the US market. These chicken are grown for about 84 days, twice as long as Cornish Cross chickens. The French Poulet Rouge Cu Nu naked neck "Air Chilled" chicken is available at Whole Foods. [/quote]
    I don't understand that statement. I bought several heritage chickens 15 years ago ( around $40 per chicken at the time ). I decided they were not worth the money, but I think you could always get heritage chickens.[/quote]

    Yes 15 years ago, you could buy heritage chickens. The very best French chicken is the Bleu de Bresse (blue legs) was available. It may have been through Canada.

    When I say "entered the US market" I am speaking of fairly wide spread distribution.

    That only happened in the past year or so.

    My statement referred to the wide spread availability of heritage breeds.
  • Post #27 - February 2nd, 2022, 12:11 pm
    Post #27 - February 2nd, 2022, 12:11 pm Post #27 - February 2nd, 2022, 12:11 pm
    budrichard wrote:I doubt if John's Live Poultry will have an actual Rooster.

    John's regularly carries roosters, as noted on their awning and emphasized by the artwork in the window. Here's a Google photo from a few years ago.

    Image

    I would think that many of the other dozen or so live poultry markets in Chicago would also be able to provide roosters (perhaps with advance notice).

    We discussed a similar topic over 15 years ago in the Hard Chickens in a Chicago Landmark thread. Macias Produce is still in business, but I'm not sure if they still carry hard chickens. In that thread Geo expressed concern about the vines covering the landmarked terra cotta ornament. He will be happy to hear the vines were permanently removed many years ago when Macias took over the building.

    G Wiv wrote:
    David Hammond wrote:other places where I can buy just four or five pounds or so of old sheep meat for my Scottish Broth.

    I'd start with one of the Halal butchers on Devon.

    Farm City Meat Halal

    YaSeen Zabiha Halal Meat

    Mehrab Zabiha Meat

    In addition to those I'd check Halsted Packing House (445 N Halsted), which slaughters goats and lambs on site.

    Barkaat Foods, the only halal slaughterhouse in Chicago, would be worth contacting as well. They took over the Chiapetti facility on Halsted in Bridgeport.

    Cathy2 wrote:It may not exactly be suitable for this recipe, you may want to consider a mature duck.

    Sounds like just the thing for duck soup. I understand it's not difficult.
  • Post #28 - February 2nd, 2022, 2:15 pm
    Post #28 - February 2nd, 2022, 2:15 pm Post #28 - February 2nd, 2022, 2:15 pm
    I stand corrected!
    Just got off the phone with John's on Fullerton and they have live Rooster.
    I will check on Friday if they have one available and get one!
    I think a nice bunny and a few pigeons would be nice!
    Pheasants I get from my buddies.
    -Richard
  • Post #29 - February 2nd, 2022, 3:08 pm
    Post #29 - February 2nd, 2022, 3:08 pm Post #29 - February 2nd, 2022, 3:08 pm
    As a kind of aside, here's a photo of the coq au vin we had last week at River Roast. Made with red wine, there's a slight purplish tinge to the stew. A lot of the apparent deliciousness in this shot comes from the browning/maillard reaction evident in the chicken (not rooster) in the photo.

    Image

    .
    "Don't you ever underestimate the power of a female." Bootsy Collins
  • Post #30 - February 6th, 2022, 3:04 am
    Post #30 - February 6th, 2022, 3:04 am Post #30 - February 6th, 2022, 3:04 am
    Picked up two Roosters, two rabbits and two pigeons yesterday at John's.
    Line to order moved fast as most were ordering Pollo.
    Fast efficient processing for order.
    Parking a bitch, so I went behind and shoehorned the XC into a place between two huge pickups. Alley snow-covered, not plowed but no problem for XC.
    Side streets have huge speed bumps not marked but for XC no problem.
    I had not experienced Chicago Street after a snow in many years.
    Radar enforced Speed Limits? Are they actual?
    Had two coolers, one with 20# bag of ice to cool down purchase on the way home.
    Feet are left attached to Roosters, nice touch.
    Will hang one in Garage for use in a few days and freeze the rest.
    Rabbits were medium size so I don't know yet whether I can make boneless saddle or just use as fryers.
    More to come as we will make Coq au Vin in a few days using Bocuse recipe.
    _Richard

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