LTH Home

Exploring a Cookbook: FLAVOR by Yotam Ottolenghi

Exploring a Cookbook: FLAVOR by Yotam Ottolenghi
  • Forum HomePost Reply BackTop
  • Exploring a Cookbook: FLAVOR by Yotam Ottolenghi

    Post #1 - April 18th, 2024, 7:17 pm
    Post #1 - April 18th, 2024, 7:17 pm Post #1 - April 18th, 2024, 7:17 pm
    I have cooked from several of his other books, Jerusalem and Plenty most frequently. I picked this one up early in the Pandemic and for no particular reason, it's just sat on the shelf.

    Part of the intro states "These recipes are about getting big flavors on the table in much less time and with, proportionately, much less work."

    I am looking forward to seeing if I believe that to be true. These will be rated on a scale of 1-5. 5 being "easy-peasy, no problem to prepare on a weeknight and/or full of flavor". 1 being "holy cow, don't even think about doing this on a weeknight and/or not worth the trouble flavor-wise."

    If you have this book, please comment. Let me know your favorites and/or dislikes. Better yet, cook along with me and post here.

    I began with a dish that is a side, not a main - White Bean Mash with Garlic Aioli.

    In my opinion, this dish requires some advance planning and breaking up of tasks if making/serving on a weeknight. Alternately, it could be made on a weekend to be served up to a few days later.

    Ingredients:

    Dry Cannellini Beans
    Onion
    Garlic
    Rosemary
    Thyme
    Green Chile
    Olive Oil
    Dijon Mustard
    Anchovy Fillets
    Lemon Juice
    Dill
    Aleppo Chile Flakes

    I soaked the beans on Tuesday. Wednesday I made the garlic oil, cooked and pureed the beans, and made the aioli.

    Image

    Image

    Image

    Image

    Tonight I brought everything up to room temperature, dressed the 1 cup of reserved cooked beans and assembled everything.

    Image

    Image

    How was it?

    ***sigh***

    A solid "1". It was visually appealing and I did enjoy the contrasting textures. Surprisingly, what was lacking was FLAVOR. Despite ample seasoning and a day to meld in the refrigerator, nothing popped. Overall it was pretty flat. Jonathan didn't like it at all. Audrey and I ate our portions but not enthusiastically. I tossed the leftovers, which I almost never do.

    Hopefully, it's all uphill from here. I am planning to try an entree next.
  • Post #2 - April 28th, 2024, 12:43 pm
    Post #2 - April 28th, 2024, 12:43 pm Post #2 - April 28th, 2024, 12:43 pm
    The Ultimate Roasting Pan Ragu

    I was very intrigued by this recipe.

    In the prelude he states their mission was to create the best meatless ragu and that it took quite a bit of R & D. "There's no denying the list of ingredients is long, but these are all here to give the ragu it's fantastic umaminess." OK, I'm always up for umami.

    Ingredients:

    Carrots
    Onion
    Oyster Mushrooms
    Dried Porcini Mushrooms
    Garlic
    Plum Tomatoes
    Olive Oil
    White Miso Paste
    Rose Harissa - Not something I'd ever heard of much less had on hand. I thought about leaving it out but caved and Amazoned it the day before.
    Image
    Tomato Paste
    Soy Sauce
    Cumin Seeds, crushed
    Dried Lentils
    Pearl Barley
    Vegetable or Chicken Stock
    Coconut Cream
    Red Wine (I had an open bottle of Primitivo Di Manduria)
    Water, Salt & Pepper

    Veggies are chopped fine in batches via a food processor. Or, of course you can do it by hand. Sometimes I'm in the mood to flex my knife skills, this time I opted to go the machine route. The recipe is time consuming enough in terms of oven time, so I wanted to get the veg prep done ASAP.

    The chopped veg go in a roasting pan along with the olive oil, miso, harissa, tomato paste, soy, & cumin seeds. You roast at 400 degrees for 20 minutes, stir, and roast another 20 minutes. Here's what it looked like at that point:
    Image

    Reduce oven temp to 375 degrees. Then, add lentils, barley, stock, coconut cream, wine, water and salt & pepper.
    Image

    Cover tightly with foil and roast another 40 minutes. Remove foil and bake another 5 minutes. Then rest for 15 minutes.
    Image

    This sauce is recommended with pasta, polenta, or as the base for shepherd's pie or lasagna. I opted to toss it with pappardelle.
    Image

    Due to oven time, this is not something I would consider making on a weeknight. So I'm rating this one on effort to flavor.

    Ultimate? I can't say that I have much to compare it to but this was pretty darn tasty. I eat vegetarian about 95% of the time. I'm not into processed imitation meat so this style of cooking is right up my alley. Rating this one a "2".
  • Post #3 - April 28th, 2024, 4:31 pm
    Post #3 - April 28th, 2024, 4:31 pm Post #3 - April 28th, 2024, 4:31 pm
    LynnB wrote:The Ultimate Roasting Pan Ragu

    I was very intrigued by this recipe.

    In the prelude he states their mission was to create the best meatless ragu and that it took quite a bit of R & D. "There's no denying the list of ingredients is long, but these are all here to give the ragu it's fantastic umaminess." OK, I'm always up for umami.

    Ingredients:

    Carrots
    Onion
    Oyster Mushrooms
    Dried Porcini Mushrooms
    Garlic
    Plum Tomatoes
    Olive Oil
    White Miso Paste
    Rose Harissa - Not something I'd ever heard of much less had on hand. I thought about leaving it out but caved and Amazoned it the day before.
    Image
    Tomato Paste
    Soy Sauce
    Cumin Seeds, crushed
    Dried Lentils
    Pearl Barley
    Vegetable or Chicken Stock
    Coconut Cream
    Red Wine (I had an open bottle of Primitivo Di Manduria)
    Water, Salt & Pepper

    Veggies are chopped fine in batches via a food processor. Or, of course you can do it by hand. Sometimes I'm in the mood to flex my knife skills, this time I opted to go the machine route. The recipe is time consuming enough in terms of oven time, so I wanted to get the veg prep done ASAP.

    The chopped veg go in a roasting pan along with the olive oil, miso, harissa, tomato paste, soy, & cumin seeds. You roast at 400 degrees for 20 minutes, stir, and roast another 20 minutes. Here's what it looked like at that point:
    Image

    Reduce oven temp to 375 degrees. Then, add lentils, barley, stock, coconut cream, wine, water and salt & pepper.
    Image

    Cover tightly with foil and roast another 40 minutes. Remove foil and bake another 5 minutes. Then rest for 15 minutes.
    Image

    This sauce is recommended with pasta, polenta, or as the base for shepherd's pie or lasagna. I opted to toss it with pappardelle.
    Image

    Due to oven time, this is not something I would consider making on a weeknight. So I'm rating this one on effort to flavor.

    Ultimate? I can't say that I have much to compare it to but this was pretty darn tasty. I eat vegetarian about 95% of the time. I'm not into processed imitation meat so this style of cooking is right up my alley. Rating this one a "2".


    Editing because I failed at my own rating system. I meant to give this a “4”. It was very good, but not great. It also looks a lot more dry in the picture than it actually was.

    Going to try a tofu dish sometime next week…
  • Post #4 - April 28th, 2024, 6:03 pm
    Post #4 - April 28th, 2024, 6:03 pm Post #4 - April 28th, 2024, 6:03 pm
    This sauce looks interesting but, as you point out, seems like a bit of work. Do you think a large batch could be made and frozen, or would the recipe not lend itself to that? I feel like I would be more inclined to do this if I felt like I could get a few future meals out of it.
  • Post #5 - April 28th, 2024, 6:24 pm
    Post #5 - April 28th, 2024, 6:24 pm Post #5 - April 28th, 2024, 6:24 pm
    Northcenter Joe wrote:This sauce looks interesting but, as you point out, seems like a bit of work. Do you think a large batch could be made and frozen, or would the recipe not lend itself to that? I feel like I would be more inclined to do this if I felt like I could get a few future meals out of it.


    Hi Joe,

    I used a little more than half of the ragu for 1# of pappardelle and did freeze the remainder. I’m thinking I’d like to try it next with some type of polenta.
  • Post #6 - April 28th, 2024, 7:03 pm
    Post #6 - April 28th, 2024, 7:03 pm Post #6 - April 28th, 2024, 7:03 pm
    That is a really interesting ingredient list. Would you say the texture was similar to a Bolognese sauce? What was the dominant flavor in the end?

    - zorkmead
  • Post #7 - April 28th, 2024, 8:13 pm
    Post #7 - April 28th, 2024, 8:13 pm Post #7 - April 28th, 2024, 8:13 pm
    zorkmead wrote:That is a really interesting ingredient list. Would you say the texture was similar to a Bolognese sauce? What was the dominant flavor in the end?

    - zorkmead


    Hi, yes, the texture was definitely similar, as was the aroma. I would say it had a bit more “earthiness” due to the lentils.
  • Post #8 - April 30th, 2024, 12:18 pm
    Post #8 - April 30th, 2024, 12:18 pm Post #8 - April 30th, 2024, 12:18 pm
    Thank you for replying and sharing your thoughts - this thread is really interesting!

    - zorkmead
  • Post #9 - May 1st, 2024, 1:58 pm
    Post #9 - May 1st, 2024, 1:58 pm Post #9 - May 1st, 2024, 1:58 pm
    Going to London in June and will be stopping @ a couple of his places.
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #10 - May 1st, 2024, 5:24 pm
    Post #10 - May 1st, 2024, 5:24 pm Post #10 - May 1st, 2024, 5:24 pm
    Jazzfood wrote:Going to London in June and will be stopping @ a couple of his places.

    Friends of mine were recently at NOPI on my recommendation, they were quite pleased.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #11 - May 1st, 2024, 7:34 pm
    Post #11 - May 1st, 2024, 7:34 pm Post #11 - May 1st, 2024, 7:34 pm
    Have main room and the next pm w/Fergus (it's my bday). We'll check out one of his deli's as well. I like his books and only realized a few days ago he's in London (where we're going) so made the res. If you have more intel, pls dispense.
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #12 - May 6th, 2024, 5:11 pm
    Post #12 - May 6th, 2024, 5:11 pm Post #12 - May 6th, 2024, 5:11 pm
    zorkmead wrote:Thank you for replying and sharing your thoughts - this thread is really interesting!

    - zorkmead


    Thanks for engaging - I appreciate it!

    Last week I made "Noor's Black Lime Tofu."

    A caveat - I did not follow his preparation method for the tofu. I am not a fan of pan-frying/deep frying tofu on my stovetop. Unless Mr. Ottolenghi's going to swing by later and do the cleanup, I'm going to do my usual oven baked, no-mess method: Toss previously pressed tofu cubes in olive oil, soy sauce, and cornstarch. Spread out on a sheet pan lined with nonstick foil. Bake at 350 for 15 minutes, turn over and bake 15 more minutes. FYI, I used 2 tablespoons of oil total while he called for 2 1/2 cups of sunflower oil for stovetop frying.

    The rest of the recipe was prepared to his specifications. Well, with one more exception, *see below.

    Ingredients:
    Apple Cider Vinegar
    Sugar
    Red Onion
    Sunflower Oil (I didn't use this.)
    2 blocks Extra-Firm Tofu
    Cornstarch
    Yellow Onions
    Garlic
    Olive Oil
    Cumin Seeds
    Dried Black Limes - (I had these on hand. An acquaintance from Iraq tipped me off to this ingredient years ago. We were discussing a soup I had made and he suggested adding a couple of these to the pot next time. I find them a welcome addition in many middle eastern-style soups/stews.)
    Tomato Paste
    Water
    Black Pepper
    1 cup chopped Parsley (*I left this out. I just couldn't imagine it's purpose here. Possibly a mistake on my part but I'll live with it.)
    Baby Spinach

    Step one is doing a quick pickle of the thinly sliced red onion.

    Image

    Next, prepare the tofu, which I have described above.

    Image


    While your onion is pickling and your tofu is frying/baking, he instructs you to get out your food processor and mince the yellow onions and garlic. This was a case where I felt the machine was unnecessary so I did it by hand. This mixture gets sauteed in olive oil for about 10 minutes.

    Image

    Next, add the crushed cumin seeds, ground black lime powder, and tomato paste. After a few minutes add water, sugar, salt & pepper.

    Image

    Image

    Image

    Simmer about 6 minutes then add the tofu, followed by the spinach in increments, stirring until wilted.

    Image

    Serve with rice or warm flatbreads. I went with jasmine rice.

    Image

    Serve topped with the pickled onion.

    Image

    This was good, but not great. A solid "3". Enjoyed it, but I won't rush to make it again.
  • Post #13 - May 6th, 2024, 6:11 pm
    Post #13 - May 6th, 2024, 6:11 pm Post #13 - May 6th, 2024, 6:11 pm
    LynnB wrote:Last week I made "Noor's Black Lime Tofu."

    A caveat - I did not follow his preparation method for the tofu. I am not a fan of pan-frying/deep frying tofu on my stovetop. Unless Mr. Ottolenghi's going to swing by later and do the cleanup, I'm going to do my usual oven baked, no-mess method: Toss previously pressed tofu cubes in olive oil, soy sauce, and cornstarch. Spread out on a sheet pan lined with nonstick foil. Bake at 350 for 15 minutes, turn over and bake 15 more minutes. FYI, I used 2 tablespoons of oil total while he called for 2 1/2 cups of sunflower oil for stovetop frying . . .

    LOL! I really like how you made this your own, both in technique and ingredients. That said, you don't think the parsley would have added anything or changed the dish? I find it pretty potent, especially flat leaf in that quantity.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #14 - May 6th, 2024, 6:37 pm
    Post #14 - May 6th, 2024, 6:37 pm Post #14 - May 6th, 2024, 6:37 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    LynnB wrote:Last week I made "Noor's Black Lime Tofu."

    A caveat - I did not follow his preparation method for the tofu. I am not a fan of pan-frying/deep frying tofu on my stovetop. Unless Mr. Ottolenghi's going to swing by later and do the cleanup, I'm going to do my usual oven baked, no-mess method: Toss previously pressed tofu cubes in olive oil, soy sauce, and cornstarch. Spread out on a sheet pan lined with nonstick foil. Bake at 350 for 15 minutes, turn over and bake 15 more minutes. FYI, I used 2 tablespoons of oil total while he called for 2 1/2 cups of sunflower oil for stovetop frying . . .

    LOL! I really like how you made this your own, both in technique and ingredients. That said, you don't think the parsley would have added anything or changed the dish? I find it pretty potent, especially flat leaf in that quantity.

    =R=


    I’m sure it would have changed it. I just don’t care much for warm/hot parsley unless it’s completely puréed/blended. For this recipe he has you rough chop it and stir it in with the tofu prior to adding the spinach. I didn’t think I would like the texture/mouthfeel. Solely a personal preference. Would love to hear from someone who made the dish with the parsley. Who knows, perhaps something magical happens and the dish would have been elevated to a “5.”
  • Post #15 - May 6th, 2024, 6:50 pm
    Post #15 - May 6th, 2024, 6:50 pm Post #15 - May 6th, 2024, 6:50 pm
    LynnB wrote:
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    LynnB wrote:Last week I made "Noor's Black Lime Tofu."

    A caveat - I did not follow his preparation method for the tofu. I am not a fan of pan-frying/deep frying tofu on my stovetop. Unless Mr. Ottolenghi's going to swing by later and do the cleanup, I'm going to do my usual oven baked, no-mess method: Toss previously pressed tofu cubes in olive oil, soy sauce, and cornstarch. Spread out on a sheet pan lined with nonstick foil. Bake at 350 for 15 minutes, turn over and bake 15 more minutes. FYI, I used 2 tablespoons of oil total while he called for 2 1/2 cups of sunflower oil for stovetop frying . . .

    LOL! I really like how you made this your own, both in technique and ingredients. That said, you don't think the parsley would have added anything or changed the dish? I find it pretty potent, especially flat leaf in that quantity.

    =R=


    I’m sure it would have changed it. I just don’t care much for warm/hot parsley unless it’s completely puréed/blended. For this recipe he has you rough chop it and stir it in with the tofu prior to adding the spinach. I didn’t think I would like the texture/mouthfeel. Solely a personal preference. Would love to hear from someone who made the dish with the parsley. Who knows, perhaps something magical happens and the dish would have been elevated to a “5.”

    Gotcha. You have to make it comfortable for yourself. And yeah, that'd have to be some damned magical parsley to alter it that much . . . kind of reminds me of a Grateful Dead show I once attended! :lol:

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #16 - May 7th, 2024, 10:20 am
    Post #16 - May 7th, 2024, 10:20 am Post #16 - May 7th, 2024, 10:20 am
    I definitely think it would’ve added a freshness component since it called for a whole cup—I would probably have subbed fresh celery leaf (especially Chinese celery—I often use that in place of parsley) or even cilantro. Without something like that, I think it would be a very different dish.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #17 - May 7th, 2024, 7:51 pm
    Post #17 - May 7th, 2024, 7:51 pm Post #17 - May 7th, 2024, 7:51 pm
    What else do you use the Black dried lime for? I had never heard of that ingredient until I read about it in this thread!

    - zorkmead
  • Post #18 - May 7th, 2024, 8:15 pm
    Post #18 - May 7th, 2024, 8:15 pm Post #18 - May 7th, 2024, 8:15 pm
    zorkmead wrote:What else do you use the Black dried lime for? I had never heard of that ingredient until I read about it in this thread!

    - zorkmead


    Personally, I use them as seasoning in some soups & stews. You can leave them whole and then remove them before serving, the same way you might use a whole cinnamon stick or cardamom pods. Or, you can grind them to a powder and sprinkle that in. It has a tang similar to sumac but with a bright, citrus-y finish.
  • Post #19 - May 10th, 2024, 4:32 pm
    Post #19 - May 10th, 2024, 4:32 pm Post #19 - May 10th, 2024, 4:32 pm
    Last night's dinner was Chickpea Pancakes with Mango Pickle Yogurt.

    Ingredients:

    Pancakes:
    Olive Oil
    Fresh Curry Leaves
    Minced Ginger
    Garlic
    Green Chile (I used Finger)
    Green Onions
    Chickpea Flour
    Cornstarch
    Baking Powder
    Sparkling Water
    Apple Cider Vinegar
    Ground Cumin
    Garam Masala
    Salt

    Mango Pickle Yogurt:
    Greek-Style Yogurt
    Fresh Mango
    Hot Mango Pickle
    Lime Zest
    Salt

    Sunflower Oil (for frying the pancakes)
    Lime Wedges

    You begin by frying the curry leaves in the olive oil. This is to flavor the oil and to have the leaves as garnish. Drain the leaves on paper towel.
    Image

    Use the flavored oil to gently fry the ginger, garlic, chile, and green onions. Let cool.

    While that mixture is cooling, combine the chickpea flour, cornstarch, baking powder, sparkling water, vinegar, cumin, garam masala, and salt. Stir in the cooled onion/ginger mixture and let rest for 15 minutes.

    In the meantime, make the yogurt mixture by stirring all the ingredients together.
    Image

    When I returned to the pancake batter it was very thick.Image

    As he states it should be pourable, I wound up gradually adding quite a bit more sparkling water. Over the course of making the pancakes, I would say about 3/4 cup.
    Image

    Final instructions were to "Divide the pancakes among four plates, spoon the yogurt alongside, and top with the crispy curry leaves. Serve at once with the lime wedges on the side." In the intro to the recipe he also recommended serving these with soft-boiled eggs. Always a sucker for an egg add-on, I went with his suggestion. We also had some herb salad at the table.
    Image

    Audrey and I enjoyed this a bit more than Jonathan. The star of the show was the Mango Pickle Yogurt. I loved the combo of the diced fresh mango with the hot pickle. The pancakes were mildly spiced. We wound up topping them with the yogurt and herb salad, squeezing lime juice over and then mixing in the egg.

    I had a leftover pancake with the small amount of unused yogurt for breakfast today because I am a fan of savory breakfast. The yogurt was even better on day two. Definitely a keeper condiment.

    This is do-able on a weeknight as long as you start out organized and multi-task along the way. Giving this one a "4" out of "5".
  • Post #20 - May 27th, 2024, 9:29 am
    Post #20 - May 27th, 2024, 9:29 am Post #20 - May 27th, 2024, 9:29 am
    Hit on a real winner last night - Potato and Gochujang Braised Eggs.

    Ingredients:
    Russet Potatoes
    Kohlrabi
    Gochujang Paste
    White Miso
    Garlic
    Olive Oil
    Salt
    Eggs

    For Sauce:
    Lime Juice
    Gochujang Paste
    Olive Oil
    Chives
    White & Black Sesame Seeds

    Image
    Prepping the potato & kohlrabi.

    Image
    Tossed with the paste, miso, garlic, olive oil & salt.

    Image
    Oven baked for about 25 minutes.

    Image
    Eggs added.

    Image
    Covered and baked about 8 minutes, then drizzled with sauce.

    Image
    Plated up.

    This could easily be done on a weeknight and truly brought big flavor. We all loved it.
  • Post #21 - May 27th, 2024, 10:34 am
    Post #21 - May 27th, 2024, 10:34 am Post #21 - May 27th, 2024, 10:34 am
    Looks like a really cool variation on Shakshuka. I've got some kohlrabi coming my way later this week. May have to give this a try. Thanks!

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #22 - June 3rd, 2024, 4:57 pm
    Post #22 - June 3rd, 2024, 4:57 pm Post #22 - June 3rd, 2024, 4:57 pm
    So, Tofu Meatball Korma.

    Prepare to get your blender dirty. And your food processor, mortar & pestle, box grater...

    You will toast, crush, pickle, puree, saute, bake...

    The intro states "If you don't have time to make the meatballs, you could just make the sauce to serve with roasted cauliflower or sweet potato."

    I knew I was in for a ride here. Let's see if it was worth it.

    I did a little prep on Saturday - made the pickled red onions and did some slicing, chopping, mincing.

    Began the rest of the process around 4:30 p.m. on Sunday and finished at 7 p.m. Granted, I was working at a leisurely pace and some of that was just cooking time.

    Hold tight for the ingredient list:
    Red Onion
    Lemon Juice
    Salt
    Cashews
    Blanched Almonds
    Olive Oil
    Brown Button Mushrooms
    Extra-Firm Tofu
    Garlic
    Silken Tofu
    Tahini
    Soy Sauce
    Panko
    Cornstarch
    Green Onions
    Cilantro
    Cardamom Pods
    Cumin Seeds
    Coriander Seeds
    Onion
    Ginger
    Green Chile
    Cinnamon Stick
    Turmeric
    Plum Tomatoes

    Image

    Image
    Uncooked "Meatballs"

    Image
    Cooked "Meatballs"

    Image
    Sauce

    Image
    Plated with basmati rice.

    End result: it was tasty. Enjoyed it. Work to reward ratio was not great though. Despite my griping above, I did enjoy the process and found the whole recipe interesting, BUT, I doubt I'll do it again.
  • Post #23 - June 4th, 2024, 9:02 am
    Post #23 - June 4th, 2024, 9:02 am Post #23 - June 4th, 2024, 9:02 am
    Hi,

    As much as I like Ottolenghi books, they are not for everyone.

    I almost crashed and burned my cookbook club when I submitted one for our meeting. The biggest complaint was so many ingredients.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways,
  • Post #24 - June 4th, 2024, 6:08 pm
    Post #24 - June 4th, 2024, 6:08 pm Post #24 - June 4th, 2024, 6:08 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:Hi,

    As much as I like Ottolenghi books, they are not for everyone.

    I almost crashed and burned my cookbook club when I submitted one for our meeting. The biggest complaint was so many ingredients.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    The recipes can be complex, but often you can break them down into several preps, some of which you can use on their own.

    That dude can do amazing things with vegetables (putting tahini all over them, for instance).
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #25 - Yesterday, 11:02 am
    Post #25 - Yesterday, 11:02 am Post #25 - Yesterday, 11:02 am
    Iceberg Wedges with Smoky Eggplant Cream

    I made this for dinner last Thursday. Huge winner! Everything I look for in a salad - contrasting textures, crispy and creamy at the same time.

    Eggplant Cream:
    Eggplants
    Lemon Juice
    Garlic
    Greek-Style Yogurt
    Dijon
    Olive Oil
    Salt & Pepper

    Crunchy Bits:
    Olive Oil
    Almonds
    Sourdough Bread - (I cheated and skipped making my own breadcrumbs. Just used panko.)
    Pumpkin Seeds
    Salt
    Chile Flakes

    Salad:
    Iceberg Lettuce
    Olive Oil
    Salt & Pepper
    Parmesan
    Rainbow or Breakfast Radishes - (Fresh Farms did not have so mine were just standard.)
    Avocados
    Chives - (didn't look good this week so I used some green onion tops.)

    In the main body of the recipe he has you put the eggplant on a well-greased grill pan on high heat and char it, turning, for 45-50 minutes. He specifically instructs you to make sure to ventilate your kitchen.

    However, in the prelude to the recipe there is another option. "If you with to avoid all that smoke in your kitchen and hate the sight of a thick layer of charcoal on your grill pan once you're done, here's another method: Preheat the oven to 475, then rub with a little oil, place on a parchment-lined baking sheet, cut-side up, and roast until soft and very well browned, 40-45 minutes." Yep, I did this.

    Image
    Prepped Eggplant

    Image
    Roasted Eggplant

    Can't seem to get away from the food processor with these recipes.
    Image
    Eggplant Cream

    Image
    Crispy Bits

    Image
    The wedges are quite thin - 12 from 1 head of lettuce. I found it easier to eat than your standard wedge salad. A solid 5 out of 5 for this one.

Contact

About

Team

Advertize

Close

Chat

Articles

Guide

Events

more