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Favorite cold weather recipes

Favorite cold weather recipes
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  • Post #31 - January 30th, 2019, 2:12 pm
    Post #31 - January 30th, 2019, 2:12 pm Post #31 - January 30th, 2019, 2:12 pm
    In the last few days, I've made split pea soup and a pot roast. Today I'm braising lamb shanks. I'm thinking I may do a variation on this Nigella recipe. Since I only have fresh Medjool dates, and not many of them, I may substitute dried cherries. It's a great day to warm up your kitchen with cooking and baking!
  • Post #32 - January 30th, 2019, 3:14 pm
    Post #32 - January 30th, 2019, 3:14 pm Post #32 - January 30th, 2019, 3:14 pm
    Love seeing an old post refreshed! Today I made smoked sausage and wild rice soup. Basic and nothing fancy but so satisfying. Moving on to brownies and bread. Who knows what tomorrow shall bring but I have a bag of apples!
    Reading is a right. Censorship is not.
  • Post #33 - January 30th, 2019, 8:13 pm
    Post #33 - January 30th, 2019, 8:13 pm Post #33 - January 30th, 2019, 8:13 pm
    we baked a grapefruit yogurt cake from smitten, alison roman's chocolate salted butter shortbread, a spaghetti squash, and caramelized three pounds of onions. sous vide pork chops, kale salad, and the squash were dinner. maybe the onions will be french onion soup for tomorrow.
  • Post #34 - February 2nd, 2019, 12:36 pm
    Post #34 - February 2nd, 2019, 12:36 pm Post #34 - February 2nd, 2019, 12:36 pm
    Pot roast, bean soup, pea soup, cauliflower potato soup, pasta with meat sauce, chili, pork roast with mashed potatoes or dumplings, swiss steak, beef stew, etc.
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #35 - January 9th, 2020, 11:56 pm
    Post #35 - January 9th, 2020, 11:56 pm Post #35 - January 9th, 2020, 11:56 pm
    Storm prep: Bought a cabbage. If we don't loose electricity, it will be stuffed cabbage. If we loose electricity, then it will be sweet and sour cabbage soup.

    I learned I cannot turn on my gas stove, if the electricity goes out. I can always turn on the stove top.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #36 - January 10th, 2020, 9:23 am
    Post #36 - January 10th, 2020, 9:23 am Post #36 - January 10th, 2020, 9:23 am
    Cabbage can sit out with the power off, it's the rest of the ingredients that may be challenging without power.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #37 - January 10th, 2020, 9:40 am
    Post #37 - January 10th, 2020, 9:40 am Post #37 - January 10th, 2020, 9:40 am
    JoelF wrote:Cabbage can sit out with the power off, it's the rest of the ingredients that may be challenging without power.

    Soup is vegetarian, so it works better than meat stuffed cabbage.

    I do happen to have mushrooms, so I could do a meatless cabbage roll.

    What I did learn is gas ovens made from 1990 will not ignite without power. We were wondering if we could bake or roast with the lights out, but it appears not.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #38 - January 10th, 2020, 11:12 am
    Post #38 - January 10th, 2020, 11:12 am Post #38 - January 10th, 2020, 11:12 am
    For some reason, Helen Rosner has been posting pics of a sausage, bean and kale soup a lot recently. I'll be making a batch for lunch this weekend.

    https://tinyletter.com/hels/letters/iss ... lo-roberto
  • Post #39 - January 10th, 2020, 11:43 am
    Post #39 - January 10th, 2020, 11:43 am Post #39 - January 10th, 2020, 11:43 am
    WhyBeeSea wrote:For some reason, Helen Rosner has been posting pics of a sausage, bean and kale soup a lot recently. I'll be making a batch for lunch this weekend.

    https://tinyletter.com/hels/letters/iss ... lo-roberto

    Thanks. I might be joining you in that endeavor. ;-) It sounds good!
    -Mary
  • Post #40 - January 10th, 2020, 11:57 am
    Post #40 - January 10th, 2020, 11:57 am Post #40 - January 10th, 2020, 11:57 am
    The GP wrote:
    WhyBeeSea wrote:For some reason, Helen Rosner has been posting pics of a sausage, bean and kale soup a lot recently. I'll be making a batch for lunch this weekend.

    https://tinyletter.com/hels/letters/iss ... lo-roberto

    Thanks. I might be joining you in that endeavor. ;-) It sounds good!


    Simple and pretty healthy! I've learned that homemade chicken stock makes all of these recipes so much better and so I've been making batches every month or so
  • Post #41 - January 10th, 2020, 12:05 pm
    Post #41 - January 10th, 2020, 12:05 pm Post #41 - January 10th, 2020, 12:05 pm
    One of my favorites, especially now that half my family is vegetarian.

    https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/riv ... minestrone
  • Post #42 - January 11th, 2020, 3:28 pm
    Post #42 - January 11th, 2020, 3:28 pm Post #42 - January 11th, 2020, 3:28 pm
    I've got Taylor's butter bean soup and a smoked ham hock going in a small crockpot and Taylor's chili with extra ground beef going on the stove. A neighbor snagged about 6 lbs of ground beef for me at Mariano's at 99 cents a pound ( ! ) with the understanding that I would turn it into meatloaf, meatballs, and meat sauce for lasagna for both of us. I was going do all three with beef only until I saw pork chops on sale for $1.79/lb at Costco yesterday, so I'll be grinding some of those up to mix in. I do enjoy spending a cold winter weekend cooking.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #43 - January 11th, 2020, 5:51 pm
    Post #43 - January 11th, 2020, 5:51 pm Post #43 - January 11th, 2020, 5:51 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:Storm prep: Bought a cabbage. If we don't loose electricity, it will be stuffed cabbage. If we loose electricity, then it will be sweet and sour cabbage soup.

    I made lamb stuffed cabbages. When I ran out of filling, I chopped the remaining cabbage for Russian cabbage soup known as Shchi. A friend's mother always had a pot of soup simmering with Shchi the favorite. This soup will be topped with fresh dill and sour cream along with some Russian-ish black bread.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #44 - January 13th, 2020, 10:49 am
    Post #44 - January 13th, 2020, 10:49 am Post #44 - January 13th, 2020, 10:49 am
    WhyBeeSea wrote:For some reason, Helen Rosner has been posting pics of a sausage, bean and kale soup a lot recently. I'll be making a batch for lunch this weekend.

    https://tinyletter.com/hels/letters/iss ... lo-roberto

    I made up a pot of this soup and liked it, but didn't love it. The mediocre quality of the hot Italian sausage definitely was a factor. I didn't feel like going to multiple stores so bought the sausage at Cermak Produce. It was pork based since they don't carry turkey Italian sausage (N. Ridge location.) I used curly kale but would use swiss chard next time. That said, it hit the spot on a blustery Saturday night.
    -Mary
  • Post #45 - January 13th, 2020, 11:25 am
    Post #45 - January 13th, 2020, 11:25 am Post #45 - January 13th, 2020, 11:25 am
    I was so bummed on Saturday. An "icky day" for me is chili and by coincidence Mrs. ChicagoJim had defrosted a steak in the fridge for dinner the next night, and then we realized that we had dinner reservations with friends on Sunday.

    There sat the steak and my mind was transmitting "make chili, make chili, make chili"

    We even had cheese, sour cream and Fritos - so Chili Fritos was the plan, but a trip to the pantry revealed that we had neither a can of beans or any sort of tomatoes whatsoever. There was no way we were going out to the store, the snow had started, the dog was walked, and we were done for the evening.

    So, plan B turned into a game of "empty out the fridge and see what can be done". This revealed enough veggies and sauces that I was able to pull together asian marinated beef cubes, which became a spicy asian stir fry along with the assorted veggies. Good, but I still wanted that chili!!
  • Post #46 - January 13th, 2020, 11:59 am
    Post #46 - January 13th, 2020, 11:59 am Post #46 - January 13th, 2020, 11:59 am
    The GP wrote:
    WhyBeeSea wrote:For some reason, Helen Rosner has been posting pics of a sausage, bean and kale soup a lot recently. I'll be making a batch for lunch this weekend.

    https://tinyletter.com/hels/letters/iss ... lo-roberto

    I made up a pot of this soup and liked it, but didn't love it. The mediocre quality of the hot Italian sausage definitely was a factor. I didn't feel like going to multiple stores so bought the sausage at Cermak Produce. It was pork based since they don't carry turkey Italian sausage (N. Ridge location.) I used curly kale but would use swiss chard next time. That said, it hit the spot on a blustery Saturday night.


    Swiss chard would work well. Just had mine for lunch. Was it the best soup I've ever made? Nah but it was relatively healthy and way better than any soup that is available in my cafeteria. This reminds me to start/post in a a thread about good bring to work lunch options!
  • Post #47 - October 5th, 2020, 8:57 pm
    Post #47 - October 5th, 2020, 8:57 pm Post #47 - October 5th, 2020, 8:57 pm
    foo d wrote:tonite it's meatloaf, cauliflower soup, and kasha varnishkes with lotsa sauteed onions

    Hi,

    I am making kasha varnishkes for the first time. It may well be the first time I am making buckwheat.

    I have looked at the prep for regular buckwheat and kasha varnishkes. What I do not understand is why I mix in an egg and stir the buckwheat around until dry and the buckwheat no longer is meshed together.

    Adding the water, salt and butter to finish cooking the buckwheat I understand, but not the egg at the beginning.

    Please explain what magic the egg stirred into the buckwheat does?

    Thanks!

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #48 - October 5th, 2020, 9:08 pm
    Post #48 - October 5th, 2020, 9:08 pm Post #48 - October 5th, 2020, 9:08 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:Please explain what magic the egg stirred into the buckwheat does?

    I don't know about magic but egg helps keep the kasha from sticking together.

    I like kasha varnishkes, buckwheat, cute little bowtie pasta, caramelized onion, chicken fat and garlic. How could it be anything but tasty.

    Kasha varnishkes, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #49 - October 5th, 2020, 9:44 pm
    Post #49 - October 5th, 2020, 9:44 pm Post #49 - October 5th, 2020, 9:44 pm
    Hi,

    For cookbook club, the selection is The 100 Most Jewish Foods by Alana Newhouse. It is a compendium with various people contributing chapters.

    The recipe for kasha varnishkes came from Mitchell Davis of the James Beard Foundation. He wished for his husband to learn his family's version of kasha varnishkes. This recipe has three separate preparations that meet in the serving bowl: kasha, sauteed onions and mushrooms in butter, and butterfly pasta. I will admit this was a very, very good combination. I expect my family will like it, too.

    In advance of this, I was recently at The Bagel. They used small shell pasta, instead of butterfly. It was not very flavorful. The experience almost talked me out of making the kasha varnishkes.

    For sure, their flanken talked me out of making flanken.

    I cannot imagine tomorrow anyone rejecting the kasha varnishkes.

    Thank you for the upbeat feedback.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #50 - October 6th, 2020, 2:56 pm
    Post #50 - October 6th, 2020, 2:56 pm Post #50 - October 6th, 2020, 2:56 pm
    I made my first batch of 3-Bean Vegetarian Chili. I will be making more of this. I am also looking forward to making a lot of Hoppin John this winter. Usually I just make it for New Year's as a good-luck dish; but people I share that with said for me to make it more often as it is so damn tasty.
  • Post #51 - October 7th, 2020, 9:02 am
    Post #51 - October 7th, 2020, 9:02 am Post #51 - October 7th, 2020, 9:02 am
    I cook this several times a year, but never in the summertime. Today might be a good day to start up again. It's one of our favorite soups and comes together fairly easily. Substitute any high quality, freshwater smoked fish you can get your hands on - whitefish, trout, salmon. I don't think I've ever used haddock.

    https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2010/01/spotted-pig-april-bloomfield-smoked-haddock-chowder-recipe.html
  • Post #52 - October 7th, 2020, 11:13 am
    Post #52 - October 7th, 2020, 11:13 am Post #52 - October 7th, 2020, 11:13 am
    Indianbadger wrote:I made my first batch of 3-Bean Vegetarian Chili. I will be making more of this. I am also looking forward to making a lot of Hoppin John this winter. Usually I just make it for New Year's as a good-luck dish; but people I share that with said for me to make it more often as it is so damn tasty.


    I'd love that 3-Bean Chili recipe if you have it handy!
  • Post #53 - October 7th, 2020, 1:11 pm
    Post #53 - October 7th, 2020, 1:11 pm Post #53 - October 7th, 2020, 1:11 pm
    HonestMan wrote: I'd love that 3-Bean Chili recipe if you have it handy!



    Vegetarian Chili

    1 14 oz. Can Garbanzo or Kidney or Red Beans/ 1 14 oz. Can Black Beans/ 1 14 oz. Can Pinto Beans

    1 14 oz. can Fire Roasted Tomato and 1 5 oz. can Tomato Paste

    (I buy the Whole Foods 365 brand No salt added cans of Beans and Tomatoes. That way I can use the wonderful cooking liquid that the Beans/Tomatoes come in and not bother about the salt content. I like to salt my stuff anyway. Also, make sure you use Black Beans. This is the one bean that exudes starch so the Chili gets a good thickener and does not end up looking like a bean stew. I also found Pinto to be essential as a neutral bean.)

    1 Large Carrot, diced same size as beans
    1 large Onion Diced
    6 Cloves of Garlic sliced (not chopped or pressed)

    Spices:
    1 tsp Ground Guajillo
    1 tsp Ground Ancho
    1 tsp Oregano (Mexican dried preferably)
    1 tsp Allspice (Ground)
    1/2 tsp Ground Nutmeg
    1 tsp Caraway
    1 tsp Ajwain (ground)
    3 Tbsp Olive Oil

    Optional: 1 Habanero Peppers, sliced in half (Not Chopped), Soy Chorizo (el Viajero brand) and Shiitake Mushrooms (8 oz)

    Heat the oil, singe spices (15 seconds), add Onions and Garlic. Saute for 5 mins on medium heat. (Add Chorizo/mushrooms here if using, and saute for additional 3-5 mins). Add Tomato (make a slurry with chopped tomatoes, paste and 1/2 cup water). After boiling for 3 minutes, add Carrots and Habanero (if using). Cook for 5 mins. Add Beans and 1-2 cups water (depending on the thickness). Bring to boil. Salt to taste. Reduce flame to low and cook for 30 mins till flavors blended together. Garnish with Cilantro.

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