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Split pea soup

Split pea soup
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  • Post #31 - December 31st, 2008, 12:58 pm
    Post #31 - December 31st, 2008, 12:58 pm Post #31 - December 31st, 2008, 12:58 pm
    Katie wrote:I made two batches of split pea soup over the weekend, and a strange thing happened. The first batch came out as split pea mush (not that that's a bad thing), but in the second batch, the peas did not break down much at all. I did both batches in a crock pot for 8+ hours on low. I threw in a variety of things (onions, carrots, spices), and can't remember what I put in the first batch but not the second, or in the second but not the first, that caused the marked difference in pea texture. All I can remember is I might have added a little wine or sherry to the first batch but not the second. Nothing tomatoey in either, I'm sure of that. Any ideas?


    Do you by chance soak one set of beans but not the other?
  • Post #32 - December 31st, 2008, 2:30 pm
    Post #32 - December 31st, 2008, 2:30 pm Post #32 - December 31st, 2008, 2:30 pm
    Was the slow-cooker already warm when you cooked the second batch? Does your slow-cooker stay sufficiently low enough (mine runs 'hot' and I basically have to cook at a simmer, especially once it gets going).
  • Post #33 - December 31st, 2008, 2:44 pm
    Post #33 - December 31st, 2008, 2:44 pm Post #33 - December 31st, 2008, 2:44 pm
    Katie -

    I've heard multiple stories of dried splits not breaking down. Were these from the same bag? Someone once told me that if they are as old as dirt, they take a LONG, LONG, time (if ever) to break down. I never run into this issue since I'm a puree soup maker.I cook the splits until I don't feel like paying any more attention (two/three hours) then I just puree the sob's. After that, I slow cook until the pea particles melt in your mouth.
    We cannot be friends if you do not know the difference between Mayo and Miracle Whip.
  • Post #34 - January 1st, 2009, 2:02 pm
    Post #34 - January 1st, 2009, 2:02 pm Post #34 - January 1st, 2009, 2:02 pm
    Hi,

    I have a 4 pound bag of Urad Dal (split matpe beans without skin) looking for an opportunity to disapeer. I have a ham bone itching for a final passage, too. I thought I would make a variation of split pea soup with this.

    I bought these to make Kanchipuram idli for my brother-in-law, but in three visits it has never quite happened. I'm going to reserve enough to make some during a future visit, but I will still have pounds of beans to dispose of.

    If someone has experience with these beans and can offer some tips, please! If I am not using this bean optimally, then advise a better use.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #35 - January 1st, 2009, 2:27 pm
    Post #35 - January 1st, 2009, 2:27 pm Post #35 - January 1st, 2009, 2:27 pm
    Each was made with a 1-lb bag of dried split peas; the slow cooker recipes call for them to be added to the other ingredients without presoaking. The batches were made a day apart with the bowl cleaned and dried in between, so no difference in starting heat. I bought the two bags on the same day just a week or so ago, so it'd be a drag if the problem was that one of them was as old as dirt.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #36 - November 5th, 2021, 6:25 am
    Post #36 - November 5th, 2021, 6:25 am Post #36 - November 5th, 2021, 6:25 am
    Some Chicago restaurants have served split pea soup on the same day for 40 years

    https://www.wbez.org/stories/split-pea- ... 5242064a8c
    Never order barbecue in a place that also serves quiche - Lewis Grizzard
  • Post #37 - November 5th, 2021, 7:29 am
    Post #37 - November 5th, 2021, 7:29 am Post #37 - November 5th, 2021, 7:29 am
    Dave148 wrote:
    Some Chicago restaurants have served split pea soup on the same day for 40 years

    https://www.wbez.org/stories/split-pea- ... 5242064a8c

    For lunch on Thursdays in Sweden, it is Ärtsoppa pea soup and (Swedish) pancakes.

    This soup and pancake is often available at Swedish restaurants in the United States, though it can be a daily lunch item rather than dedicated to Thursday.

    There was a discussion about this last March at Swedish Pancakes for Breakfast.

    In Sweden, Swedish pancakes are a dessert item and not for breakfast. Dessert for breakfast is something I have certainly done.

    Regards,
    CAthy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #38 - November 5th, 2021, 7:37 am
    Post #38 - November 5th, 2021, 7:37 am Post #38 - November 5th, 2021, 7:37 am
    Cathy2 wrote:
    Dave148 wrote:
    Some Chicago restaurants have served split pea soup on the same day for 40 years

    https://www.wbez.org/stories/split-pea- ... 5242064a8c

    For lunch on Thursdays in Sweden, it is Ärtsoppa pea soup and (Swedish) pancakes.

    This soup and pancake is often available at Swedish restaurants in the United States, though it can be a daily lunch item rather than dedicated to Thursday.

    There was a discussion about this last March at Swedish Pancakes for Breakfast.

    In Sweden, Swedish pancakes are a dessert item and not for breakfast. Dessert for breakfast is something I have certainly done.

    Regards,
    CAthy2

    I have memories of my mom making Swedish pancakes for breakfast. I ate them the same way as I do with regular pancakes, topped with powdered sugar. I was never a fan of lingonberries.
    Never order barbecue in a place that also serves quiche - Lewis Grizzard
  • Post #39 - November 5th, 2021, 8:06 am
    Post #39 - November 5th, 2021, 8:06 am Post #39 - November 5th, 2021, 8:06 am
    Dave148 wrote:I have memories of my mom making Swedish pancakes for breakfast. I ate them the same way as I do with regular pancakes, topped with powdered sugar. I was never a fan of lingonberries.

    In our home, we will substitute cranberry sauce for lingonberries. We also like cloudberries as well as whatever jam we want to use.

    My Dad prefers thin pancakes over thick American pancakes, though he also likes waffles.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #40 - November 5th, 2021, 6:03 pm
    Post #40 - November 5th, 2021, 6:03 pm Post #40 - November 5th, 2021, 6:03 pm
    I make split pea soup with the remaining water after simmering a regular commercial, cryovac'd corned beef brisket. Some diced corned beef is in there, of course, and probably some of the skimmed fat for softening the veggies at the beginning. I also find marjoram to be an essential ingredient.

    Dang, that sounds really good right now. I haven't made it in a while.

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