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Roasting pan advice
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  • Roasting pan advice

    Post #1 - May 26th, 2006, 12:50 pm
    Post #1 - May 26th, 2006, 12:50 pm Post #1 - May 26th, 2006, 12:50 pm
    Hello friends!

    I was wondering if anyone has experience with the many kinds of roasting pans out there? I'm thinking of getting one and I'm confused with the barrage of information out there. For instance, is non-stick better than conventional? And what is the most versatile size? The primary reason I'm thinking of acquiring one is for it to function as bain marie for cheesecake. However, I'm also going to use it to roast poultry in the future. What specific brands would you recommend? I don't mind shelling out up to $100 for a roasting pan that will last. Thanks in advance! :D
    "There is no love sincerer than the love of food." - George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) Irish writer.
  • Post #2 - May 26th, 2006, 12:56 pm
    Post #2 - May 26th, 2006, 12:56 pm Post #2 - May 26th, 2006, 12:56 pm
    One of the best recommendations that I took away from Alton Brown's "Gear for your Kitchen" was to get yourself a really good small roasting pan. Nine times out of ten when you want to roast something, it's not a giant turkey or a 12 lb. roast. You'll get a ton of use out of a really good small roasting pan.

    I got the All-Clad Petit Roti (with rack) and never looked back. It's 14"x11.5" and deep enough for anything you'll need. It's a very versatile size, easy to store, and easy to move to the stovetop for gravy-making, which, I might add, is the reason you do not want a non-stick.

    I know All-Clad is a predictable response to a request for good cookware, but I have to say that it is an excellent piece of equipment and worth every penny.

    Here's an example, I'm sure you could find it cheaper if you shop around.
    http://www.cooking.com/products/shprodde.asp?SKU=195383

    Best,
    Michael
  • Post #3 - May 26th, 2006, 1:02 pm
    Post #3 - May 26th, 2006, 1:02 pm Post #3 - May 26th, 2006, 1:02 pm
    I must have missed your cheesecake requirement the first time around. If you plan on going larger than a 9" cheesecake, you might need to go for a bigger pan, but I think this size is extremely versatile.
  • Post #4 - May 26th, 2006, 1:03 pm
    Post #4 - May 26th, 2006, 1:03 pm Post #4 - May 26th, 2006, 1:03 pm
    HI,

    There is a 'buy it now' auction on e-Bay exactly in your price range. The other two auctions for the same were $150+.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #5 - May 26th, 2006, 1:15 pm
    Post #5 - May 26th, 2006, 1:15 pm Post #5 - May 26th, 2006, 1:15 pm
    Amazon.com usually has pretty good prices on pans. Before you go shopping on line, take a cruise through the department stores to get a feel for the different styles. You'll be amazed at the different handles that are out there. Plus there might be clearance items that fit the bill. I got a Emeril version of the All Clad roasting pan; paid $40.

    Oh yeah....measure the interior dimensions of your oven...take them with you, along with a tape measure to measure the pan.....

    I bake cheesecakes all the time and don't use a water bath....
  • Post #6 - May 26th, 2006, 2:50 pm
    Post #6 - May 26th, 2006, 2:50 pm Post #6 - May 26th, 2006, 2:50 pm
    marias23 wrote:The primary reason I'm thinking of acquiring one is for it to function as bain marie for cheesecake. However, I'm also going to use it to roast poultry in the future.


    Not sure why you have concluded that a "marie" pan for baking and a roasting pan for poultry should be the same thing. For baking "round" things like cheesecakes, flans, puddings, etc. I use an old, round deep-dish pizza pan for the water bath.

    I have 2 All-Clad roasting pans, but my wife, who makes the best roast chicken on the planet, insists on using her old cheapo Graniteware enamel-covered steel oval roasting pans. When she uses my fancy pans, it just doesn't come out as good, especially the gravy. Go figure.

    Bill/SFNM
  • Post #7 - May 26th, 2006, 3:50 pm
    Post #7 - May 26th, 2006, 3:50 pm Post #7 - May 26th, 2006, 3:50 pm
    The good folks at Cooks Illustrated gave this All-Clad "lasagna" pan their strong thumbs up a year or so ago. I bought it considerably cheaper during some kind of promo and very much like it. Note that despite the name, this All-Clad is not clad at all and is 100% stainless steel, so don't expect the same good stovetop characteristics of their other pans. In fact, based on quality and current price, I'd give serious consideration to this $40 Cuisinart model as a worthy contender along with whatever other recs get made in other messages.
  • Post #8 - May 26th, 2006, 4:02 pm
    Post #8 - May 26th, 2006, 4:02 pm Post #8 - May 26th, 2006, 4:02 pm
    Ralpho's recommendation of the Cuisinart is not a bad idea. I have several pieces of Cuisinart cookware and like it very much.....I wouldn't hesitate to recommend their products.
  • Post #9 - May 27th, 2006, 10:21 am
    Post #9 - May 27th, 2006, 10:21 am Post #9 - May 27th, 2006, 10:21 am
    Cheap lasagna pans are good enough for bain maries.

    Also, if you fall in love with roasting under a terra cotta dome like I have, you find yourself using your small pyrex rectangular pan lots, and you're roasting pan just sits unused, since it doesn't fit under the terra cotta.

    Roasting a chicken for an hour under terra cotta in a cheap pyrex pan at 475 degrees was easily the best roast chicken I ever made. The stuff made in my expensive All-Clad roasting pan was not as good.

    Just another way to go, if you want to consider it.

    Nancy
  • Post #10 - May 27th, 2006, 11:52 am
    Post #10 - May 27th, 2006, 11:52 am Post #10 - May 27th, 2006, 11:52 am
    For what it's worth, Cook's Illustrated liked the Calphalon Roasting pan seen here.

    From the page:

    During our 1999 rating of roasting pans, we decided that the upright handles, roomy interior, and sturdiness of All-Clad's Stainless Steel Roti ($275) justified its hefty price. Since then, however, we've noticed that our top-rated pan has a tendency to warp slightly on the stovetop while browning roasts or deglazing fond. (The Roti lacks the clad construction-an aluminum core sandwiched between layers of steel-that makes other All-Clad cookware so reliable.) So when we saw that Calphalon's fully clad Contemporary Stainless Roasting Pan features a similar design-and for a mere $100-we brought it in for the challenge.

    To our delight, the Calphalon did not warp on the stovetop, and its lighter weight made it more responsive to burner adjustments than the All-Clad pan. This new Calphalon roasting pan has everything we want, including a reasonable price.

    UPDATE: Our July/August Roasting Pan Update highlights Calphalon's Contemporary Stainless Roasting Pan ($100). In the past, this pan has been part of their Tri-Ply stainless line. Until the Tri-Ply Stainless inventory has run out, look for our favorite roaster under either of those Calphalon lines.


    Does this count as secondary, Google'd information? :twisted:
  • Post #11 - November 12th, 2009, 2:43 pm
    Post #11 - November 12th, 2009, 2:43 pm Post #11 - November 12th, 2009, 2:43 pm
    I'm a first time poster, long time lurker that had quick question. My wife and I don't have a roasting pan (not sure why we didn't register for it) and we got talked into hosting a pre-thanksgiving dinner. What do you guys recommend as a good all-around roasting pan? I'll definitely be using it for a turkey but would also use it for veg and other dishes throughout the year.

    Thanks in advance!
  • Post #12 - November 12th, 2009, 2:52 pm
    Post #12 - November 12th, 2009, 2:52 pm Post #12 - November 12th, 2009, 2:52 pm
    I don't have a recommendation, but do have a tip. Make sure that the pan you buy fits in your oven. We inherited a roasting pan from my parents because it wouldn't fit in their oven, but does fit in ours. You certainly don't want to buy a pan only to find out on Thanksgiving that it won't fit in your oven.

    Ronna
  • Post #13 - November 12th, 2009, 2:56 pm
    Post #13 - November 12th, 2009, 2:56 pm Post #13 - November 12th, 2009, 2:56 pm
    We're very happy with our Calphalon Contemporary Stainless Special-Value 16-Inch Roaster with Nonstick Roasting Rack. This was also Cooks' Illustrated favorite in their tests.

    Their other recommended pans were:

    Cuisinart Chef's Classic Roasting Pan
    KitchenAid Gourmet Distinctions Roasting Pan with Rack
    Granite Ware Oval Roasting Pan

    The Kitchenaid is only $50, and the GraniteWare is only $17, so those are the best budget options.
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #14 - November 12th, 2009, 3:32 pm
    Post #14 - November 12th, 2009, 3:32 pm Post #14 - November 12th, 2009, 3:32 pm
    Here's a link to the full Cook's Illustrated / America's Test Kitchen roasting pan review if you want OCD-level detail on the pros and cons (may need to sign up [free] to the site). Wow, they're thorough...
    Stickin' together is what good waffles do!
  • Post #15 - November 12th, 2009, 3:42 pm
    Post #15 - November 12th, 2009, 3:42 pm Post #15 - November 12th, 2009, 3:42 pm
    gleam wrote:We're very happy with our Calphalon Contemporary Stainless Special-Value 16-Inch Roaster with Nonstick Roasting Rack. This was also Cooks' Illustrated favorite in their tests.


    This is also what I have and am I'm very happy with it. I am pretty sure that I bought it for under $100, so maybe the price went up or I just found a good deal.
  • Post #16 - November 12th, 2009, 3:58 pm
    Post #16 - November 12th, 2009, 3:58 pm Post #16 - November 12th, 2009, 3:58 pm
    Hi,

    I take my broiling pan, remove the top, add a rack and roast. To roast you want as much skin exposed.

    I have two roasting pans with fitted lids that I use for pork spare ribs and sauerkraut. I stopped using them for turkeys years ago. Their design inhibited crisping instead of contributing toward it.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #17 - November 12th, 2009, 4:53 pm
    Post #17 - November 12th, 2009, 4:53 pm Post #17 - November 12th, 2009, 4:53 pm
    Thanks for the responses everyone. I hadn't considered that a roasting pan wouldn't fit in an over, but considering the handles and all it makes sense to watch out for. Thanks for the link as well, I'll be sure to check it out.

    Cathy2, your method sounds similar to what Alton did in one of his early Good Eats. Do you have any problems when it comes time to go to the stove top with the pan to make gravy?
  • Post #18 - November 12th, 2009, 5:19 pm
    Post #18 - November 12th, 2009, 5:19 pm Post #18 - November 12th, 2009, 5:19 pm
    I am also a frequent user of broiler-pan-as-roaster; however, when I do a bird that will fit, I love using my cast-iron skillet (chicken) or my Calphalon Everyday Pan (In my experience, it fits approximately up to an 18-lb turkey, but no larger) The sides generally stay far enough away from the turkey so it doesn't trap moisture. It's also much easier to make gravy in a pan that's designed for the stovetop. We didn't register for it, but some wise person gave it to us as a wedding present and we still use it regularly (it's perfect for rib roasts as well)

    The only negative is that racks are designed for oblong pans, so I usually prop the bugger up on vegetables instead...makes for better gravy, anyway.
  • Post #19 - November 12th, 2009, 10:32 pm
    Post #19 - November 12th, 2009, 10:32 pm Post #19 - November 12th, 2009, 10:32 pm
    jt312 wrote:Cathy2, your method sounds similar to what Alton did in one of his early Good Eats. Do you have any problems when it comes time to go to the stove top with the pan to make gravy?

    If I make gravy in the pan, the broiler pan doesn't present very much of a problem. It wasn't exactly designed for heating on the stove, though it will tolerate the abuse.

    Probably the most ackward time for this pan (or any other really) is when you need to flip the bird. If I can, I try to have someone to hold the pan. It's never gone flying, though it has come very close.

    Another point, I don't open and close the door to baste and check on the turkey. I keep it to a minimum, because it takes time for the oven to reach temperature again. Many of my turkey roasting sins are covered by having brined the bird.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #20 - January 7th, 2011, 11:14 am
    Post #20 - January 7th, 2011, 11:14 am Post #20 - January 7th, 2011, 11:14 am
    Made 2 Prime Rib Roasts for Christmas this year and realized that my Lasagna Pan just didn't quite cut it. I need to bite the bullet and invest in a good roasting pan as I find myself cooking with my oven more often now.

    Any suggestions, ideas, brands, store directions will help....thank you!
  • Post #21 - January 7th, 2011, 11:18 am
    Post #21 - January 7th, 2011, 11:18 am Post #21 - January 7th, 2011, 11:18 am
    I love my All Clad Stainless Petit Roti. It heats quickly and evenly, cleans easily, goes seamlessly from oven to burner for making pan sauces, and has a satisfying heft.
    You can get it at Amazon through the LTH shopping link:
    http://www.amazon.com/All-Clad-Stainles ... 615&sr=8-2


    There is also a larger version.
  • Post #22 - January 7th, 2011, 11:24 am
    Post #22 - January 7th, 2011, 11:24 am Post #22 - January 7th, 2011, 11:24 am
    I should also add that the handles are a real design coup - they are big enough to effectively grip while wearing large oven mitts. I have had many a roasting pan without handles or without big enough handles, and find them quite awkward to get in and out of the oven with heavy contents.
  • Post #23 - January 7th, 2011, 11:27 am
    Post #23 - January 7th, 2011, 11:27 am Post #23 - January 7th, 2011, 11:27 am
    Thanks for the suggestion and link. I had no idea there were different sizes. Now I have to figure out if I will be OK with the smaller one or if I need the larger one.

    My Lasagna pan handles actually broke off while I was pulling it out of the oven, I had two 3-rib roasts in the pan. Thankfully no major accidents :shock:
  • Post #24 - January 7th, 2011, 12:24 pm
    Post #24 - January 7th, 2011, 12:24 pm Post #24 - January 7th, 2011, 12:24 pm
    I have the Calphalon Try-Poly roasting pan. I have the 16" pan; it also comes in a 14" version. The Calphalon 14" version is also a little wider than the All-Clad 14" pan.

    The Amazon link is http://www.amazon.com/Calphalon-LRS1805 ... 364&sr=1-1

    This pan has two main advantages over the All-Clad:

    *The All-Clad pan is 100% stainless steel; i.e. unlike nearly all other All-Clad pans, the Petit Roti does not have an aluminum core. The Calphalon has an aluminum core that is surrounded by stainless steel. Why is an aluminum core important? Aluminum has good thermal conductivity. That means it heats up fast and the heat spreads evenly throughout it. Stainless steel has terrible thermal conductivity. That means parts of the pan will be much hotter than other parts of the pan. This is why nearly all stainless steel cookware has a layer of aluminum (or copper) sandwiched between layers of stainless steel.

    Having said that, why when would you notice the difference between a 100% stainless steel roasting pan and a pan that contains an aluminum core? Mainly you'd notice it when you put the pan on the stovetop. For example, after roasting meat, you typically would want to remove the meat and then put the pan on the stove to build/reduce a pan sauce. The 100% stainless steel pan will take longer to heat up and will have hot spots (such as the areas directly above the flame). The pan with an aluminum core will heat quicker and spread the heat throughout the pan more evenly. I also use my roasting pan as an extra large saute pan sometimes. For example, if you want to brown a lot of meat, you can do it in batches in a 12" pan or do it all at once in a roasting pan.

    You won't notice the difference in the pans that much when the pans are in the oven. The heat is hitting your meat in the oven from all directions. Unlike stovetop use, in the oven you aren't relying on the pan to transfer heat to the meat. If you aren't ever going to put your roasting pan on the stove, you mainly just want a pan that holds the food, won't warp, won't react with food, and has good handles.

    So why doesn't the All-Clad pan have the aluminum core? I can only assume it is because they can manufacture and thus sell the 100% stainless steel pan much more cheaply than a full-clad pan, and the drawbacks of 100% stainless steel in a roasting pan are not that big of a deal compared to a stovetop pan (you'd never buy a 100% stainless steel stovetop pan).

    *The second advantage of the Calphalon pan is that it is cheaper than the All-Clad.

    The handles on the Calphalon are excellent. It is easy to grip them and also keep your hands away from the food.

    Whatever you do, don't buy a nonstick roasting pan.
  • Post #25 - January 7th, 2011, 12:33 pm
    Post #25 - January 7th, 2011, 12:33 pm Post #25 - January 7th, 2011, 12:33 pm
    I'll second Calphalon - except I use the Everyday Pan, which works well for rib roasts but is a bit small for large turkeys (I've done a small turkey in it.) The advantage of this size/shape is that it easily fits over a burner on the stovetop to make sauce, instead of almost straddling two.
  • Post #26 - July 20th, 2020, 12:20 pm
    Post #26 - July 20th, 2020, 12:20 pm Post #26 - July 20th, 2020, 12:20 pm
    What is your favorite roasting pan?
  • Post #27 - July 20th, 2020, 12:31 pm
    Post #27 - July 20th, 2020, 12:31 pm Post #27 - July 20th, 2020, 12:31 pm
    juanrossi wrote:What is your favorite roasting pan?

    I use a half-sheet pan and a rack that folds flat for storage.

    Regards,
    CAthy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #28 - July 20th, 2020, 12:53 pm
    Post #28 - July 20th, 2020, 12:53 pm Post #28 - July 20th, 2020, 12:53 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:
    juanrossi wrote:What is your favorite roasting pan?

    I use a half-sheet pan and a rack that folds flat for storage.

    Unless the item I'm cooking requires covering, I do about the same. Half-sheet pan and a grid or rack on top of that. I find the benefits of traditional roasting pans do not justify their price or the additional storage space they require. That said, I love my Blanc Creatives large roaster but it's round and because of that, it's versatile. Not only can I use it to roast but also to saute and fry, as well.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

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