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When your obsession becomes mine ...

When your obsession becomes mine ...
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  • Post #31 - May 21st, 2013, 3:43 pm
    Post #31 - May 21st, 2013, 3:43 pm Post #31 - May 21st, 2013, 3:43 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:Hi,

    Since day one of reading and participating in these food boards, I have acquired obsessions that were more a reaction to people's enthusiasm rather than to my personal wims.

    In the beginning, I would read of Jim Leff's desire for Quisp flying saucer shaped cereal. I recall he didn't want anyone to tell him where it could be found, because he like the thrill of the hunt locating a box in random grocery stores. For years thereafter, I would scan the cereal aisles hoping to find my own box of Quisp. Last summer, I hit the jackpot twice: my first encounter was at Grand Food Center in Winnetka. As I scanned the aisles, the martian with the propeller on his head stared back at me. I felt like I won the lottery. I immediately bought a box and a gallon of whole milk to enjoy the experience to the maximum. Quisp reminded me of the much easier to locate Captain Crunch, but still after all these years I finally had one.

    My second box of Quisp was found at Fox and Obel in the middle of a rack of whole grain cereals. While it was fun to find my second box in six years of searching, I felt this Quisp was more calculated marketing ploy than a true spontaneous find. I will bet the farm it was offered at Fox and Obel for the Jim Leff and Chowhounds aware of this obsesssion. Somehow this was not as thrilling as the Grand Food Center experience, I did not buy the second box of Quisp.

    I saw of Quisp at Sunset Foods in Highland Park this last Saturday morning.


    When I was maybe 10-years-old, my Mom bought a box of Appian Way Pizza, because it reminded her of her childhood. Appian Way Pizza was a treat in my Mom's household. My Mom and her brother Tom would carefully mix the dough, pat it out, distribute the pizza sauce and shake parmesan cheese from a small shaker can over it. They couldn't wait for it to come from the oven and carefully cut it for a 50:50 share. My Mom had just retold this boring old chestnut of a story last summer, when a few days later I found a box of Appian Way Pizza at Garden Fresh Market in Northbrook. Naturally, I called home to report it to my Mother who was screaming with delight, then I took a box home. Appian Way Pizza is now offered complete with Crust Mix and Pizza Sauce. Just breeze past the omission of the cheese, while it wasn't great, it was part of the Appian Way Pizza experience. I made the pizza with grated parmesan, then served it to my Mom. It tasted like Bisquik in my humble opinion. My Mom didn't rave about the taste, she was still stirred up by her memories from over 50 years ago. I heard her recounting the experience with her brother and laughing over the good ol'days fighting over Appian Way Pizza.

    A box of Appian Way Pizza is sitting in my pantry waiting for Mom to have a taste for this.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #32 - May 21st, 2013, 6:16 pm
    Post #32 - May 21st, 2013, 6:16 pm Post #32 - May 21st, 2013, 6:16 pm
    I become obsessed with a variety of things here and other places I see and think I have to make or have. Some of these become long standing favorites others fade from the picture quickly. Its good to try new things and it keeps things interesting.
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #33 - May 28th, 2013, 8:37 pm
    Post #33 - May 28th, 2013, 8:37 pm Post #33 - May 28th, 2013, 8:37 pm
    Residents nibbling their last Gibble’s: The Nibble with Gibbles snack line is history, effective March 9, and local residents are upset.

    Gibbles chips may have been popular because they were made a little differently than those from larger companies. The label on a bag of chips explained their recipe.

    The company used lard instead of other available oils. "Why? Because we believe that simple and natural is best. We at Gibble's are proud to use the same fine ingredients that made us a hit many years ago at our farmers market stand - chips so wonderfully good they're "Nibble Gibble-icious!" We want to be your potato chip!"

    Fans agreed, and weren't the ones who bailed.


    Newville's potato chip tradition ends with Gibble's closing

    The potato chips had deep roots (no pun intended) in the Newville community. It was originally founded by Dot and John Greegor, who called the chips “Dot and John’s.” The couple owned other businesses in the area and the chip-making operation was eventually sold to Charles Heckendorn.

    Heckendorn’s two youngest children, Kay and Ray, became the namesake for the kettle-cooked chips. They were the children on the beach pictured on the front of every package.

    In 2007, The Sentinel interviewed former Kay and Ray’s employee, Ruth Stouffer, who remembered starting out as one of two ladies who peeled, washed, sliced and cooked the potato chips. Eventually, she moved on to become one of several women who bagged and shipped the chips.

    "When I first started working for Ruth and Charlie (Heckendorn) one of my main jobs was to cook and stir the chips once they were placed in the tubs to be cooked," Ruth said. "I had to keep my eye on the chips so they didn’t stick together; keeping them stirred around was very important."

    Ruth said she always knew when to take them out of the cooker by the color of the potatoes.

    Never heard of Kay and Ray's or Nibble Gibble-icious! until this evening, though I wish I could try those lard fried potato chips. Sounds like they were a find.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #34 - May 28th, 2013, 9:01 pm
    Post #34 - May 28th, 2013, 9:01 pm Post #34 - May 28th, 2013, 9:01 pm
    Cathy,

    I frequently bought Gibble's when I lived in Virginia. Yes, they were very good, but so are Grandma Utz chips, also fried in pure lard.

    http://www.utzsnacks.com/store/c-40-gra ... chips.aspx
    If you aren't tasting, you aren't cooking.
  • Post #35 - May 29th, 2013, 12:51 pm
    Post #35 - May 29th, 2013, 12:51 pm Post #35 - May 29th, 2013, 12:51 pm
    Evil Ronnie wrote:Cathy,

    I frequently bought Gibble's when I lived in Virginia. Yes, they were very good, but so are Grandma Utz chips, also fried in pure lard.

    http://www.utzsnacks.com/store/c-40-gra ... chips.aspx

    Hi,

    I have seen Grandma Utz snacks out East, I will now make a deliberate purchase.

    There are Uncle Ray's snacks from Detroit, which I like for the stories (often mini morality plays) on the back. According to their website, these stories:

    Ray has over 30 chapters of "The Life and Times of Uncle Ray". He felt compelled to send a message to those eating his product. "If someone was ever contemplating suicide, drugs, stealing, or what ever life's troubles bring you, I want you to know that you are not alone". "Everyone has bad days and I want to be there with a message"


    I never find them in Chicago. I find them in small towns. It is always a treat to bump into Uncle Ray's.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #36 - November 16th, 2021, 11:20 pm
    Post #36 - November 16th, 2021, 11:20 pm Post #36 - November 16th, 2021, 11:20 pm
    HI,

    I recently bought a box of Quisp at Woodman's in Buffalo Grove.

    Yes, when your obsession becomes mine continues on.

    Regards,
    CAthy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #37 - November 17th, 2021, 8:57 am
    Post #37 - November 17th, 2021, 8:57 am Post #37 - November 17th, 2021, 8:57 am
    Cathy2 wrote:HI,

    I recently bought a box of Quisp at Woodman's in Buffalo Grove.

    Yes, when your obsession becomes mine continues on.

    Regards,
    CAthy2


    No Quake?
  • Post #38 - November 17th, 2021, 9:26 am
    Post #38 - November 17th, 2021, 9:26 am Post #38 - November 17th, 2021, 9:26 am
    I forgot about Quake until I searched and saw a box. Both introduced in 1965, the space saucer motif makes sense for Quisp. My sister's halloween costume/pajamas was an astronaut. Everyone wanted to be part of the space program. Interesting how Quake goes to the center of the Earth.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q-sTnm_aPBY


    Around this time, Quaker had a rice puff commercial featuring a cannon and music from the 1812 overture. My parents really liked puffs, one box came with a floppy vinyl record with the 1812 overture. I don't think we played, because they thought it might damage the needle. Oh the concerns of 1965!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KadQn651sT4


    Could not find the commercial I remember, but here is a variant with the actors from F-Troop.

    CAthy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #39 - November 17th, 2021, 9:57 am
    Post #39 - November 17th, 2021, 9:57 am Post #39 - November 17th, 2021, 9:57 am
    Cathy2 wrote:I forgot about Quake until I searched and saw a box. Both introduced in 1965, the space saucer motif makes sense for Quisp. My sister's halloween costume/pajamas was an astronaut. Everyone wanted to be part of the space program. Interesting how Quake goes to the center of the Earth.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q-sTnm_aPBY


    Around this time, Quaker had a rice puff commercial featuring a cannon and music from the 1812 overture. My parents really liked puffs, one box came with a floppy vinyl record with the 1812 overture. I don't think we played, because they thought it might damage the needle. Oh the concerns of 1965!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KadQn651sT4


    Could not find the commercial I remember, but here is a variant with the actors from F-Troop.

    CAthy2



    The Joys of childhood Cereals indeed.

    I remember the whole "monster" line of cereals, Count Chocula, Franken Berry, Boo Berry, and maybe the less remembered Fruit (Frute) Brute and Yummy Mummy.
  • Post #40 - November 24th, 2021, 7:49 pm
    Post #40 - November 24th, 2021, 7:49 pm Post #40 - November 24th, 2021, 7:49 pm
    Cathy2 wrote: {edit}
    Around this time, Quaker had a rice puff commercial featuring a cannon and music from the 1812 overture.
    If you ever view the two-part Barney Miller episodes titled (although it was not so identified when originally broadcast) "Harris directs" {you should :twisted: }, there is a scene where Harris calls an N.Y.C. film library seeking stock footage, and he asks if they have the Puffed Rice commercial.
    No, I will not tell you why he wants the imagery.
    Valuable links for survival, without the monetization attempt: http://74.115.231.54/~pudgym29/bookmark4.html

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