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Food fit for a funeral

Food fit for a funeral
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  • Post #31 - January 6th, 2016, 11:55 am
    Post #31 - January 6th, 2016, 11:55 am Post #31 - January 6th, 2016, 11:55 am
    Funeral home's move to sell liquor, catering packages part of a trend

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/suburbs/a ... story.html
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #32 - January 6th, 2016, 11:51 pm
    Post #32 - January 6th, 2016, 11:51 pm Post #32 - January 6th, 2016, 11:51 pm
    Dave148 wrote:
    Funeral home's move to sell liquor, catering packages part of a trend

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/suburbs/a ... story.html

    In my original post circa 2007:
    A friend buried her Mother at Cedar Memorial in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. The cemetery was one-stop shopping for all the supplies and services for a funeral: florist, caskets, plot, clothing, chapels and family center with catering for the post committal meal. You had the option of using their caterer or bringing in your own food. My friend brought sandwiches, drinks and cookies for the viewing. For the post committal reception in mid-afternoon she used their caterer for serving desserts and coffee. For my friend and her children it was the first time they had attended a funeral where viewing, services, committal and closing reception were confined to the cemetery.
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #33 - May 26th, 2016, 9:34 am
    Post #33 - May 26th, 2016, 9:34 am Post #33 - May 26th, 2016, 9:34 am
    Secrets of the world's oldest funeral feast

    About 12,000 years ago, a great feast was held in honour of a mysterious woman. The group filled her grave with strange objects. Then, bizarrely, they threw the remains of their meal into the grave.

    The remains of the feast were discovered in Hilazon Tachtit cave in Israel...
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #34 - July 27th, 2016, 5:58 am
    Post #34 - July 27th, 2016, 5:58 am Post #34 - July 27th, 2016, 5:58 am
    New York State Makes It Legal to Cry in Your Funeral Pie

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/27/nyreg ... -ipad&_r=0
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #35 - July 27th, 2016, 4:55 pm
    Post #35 - July 27th, 2016, 4:55 pm Post #35 - July 27th, 2016, 4:55 pm
    Dave148 wrote:
    New York State Makes It Legal to Cry in Your Funeral Pie

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/27/nyreg ... -ipad&_r=0

    Until just recently, food could not be served at funeral homes in New York. This is not an issue in Illinois or at least I know of no prohibitions.

    One of the better food served in a funeral home was kenji's funeral last year. Smokers outside preparing brisket served in bahn mi sandwiches. Peach cobbler from Smoque.

    I have brought homemade baked cakes to my grandparents funerals. Relatives we rarely see hightailed it to the kitchen when they knew my Oma's apple cake was at her husband's funeral.

    I never saw people eating in the room where the deceased was reposed. At kenji's funeral there was a large separate room intended for food service. At my grandparents funerals, there was a small room downstairs for food service.
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #36 - July 28th, 2016, 3:40 pm
    Post #36 - July 28th, 2016, 3:40 pm Post #36 - July 28th, 2016, 3:40 pm
    We asked Avli to cater a lunch after my mother's memorial Mass. They did a wonderful and thoughtful job and delivered the food to the church. They were very accommodating and the food was excellent.
    "I live on good soup, not on fine words." -Moliere
  • Post #37 - December 9th, 2018, 5:38 pm
    Post #37 - December 9th, 2018, 5:38 pm Post #37 - December 9th, 2018, 5:38 pm
    I'm 60 years old, been to more funerals than I can count, and have never been to a restaurant for a funeral meal. In my circles, after the burial, everyone goes back to the church where the service was, for a meal and time of visiting and remembering. The church always has a committee responsible for preparing the meal, and the church pays, or sometimes people also are assigned to bring in dishes such as a dessert or salad.

    And a funeral isn't complete without funeral potatoes, although I have been to some meals with the favorite foods of the deceased. We consider it an honor and privilege to help with the food at times like these. Kind of one last thing you can do for them.
  • Post #38 - December 10th, 2018, 1:06 pm
    Post #38 - December 10th, 2018, 1:06 pm Post #38 - December 10th, 2018, 1:06 pm
    npchicago wrote:I'm 60 years old, been to more funerals than I can count, and have never been to a restaurant for a funeral meal. In my circles, after the burial, everyone goes back to the church where the service was, for a meal and time of visiting and remembering. The church always has a committee responsible for preparing the meal, and the church pays, or sometimes people also are assigned to bring in dishes such as a dessert or salad.

    And a funeral isn't complete without funeral potatoes, although I have been to some meals with the favorite foods of the deceased. We consider it an honor and privilege to help with the food at times like these. Kind of one last thing you can do for them.

    Ms. Ingie is responsible for the funeral meals at her church. She is very organized with lots of volunteers willing to bring food.

    All my grandparents funerals had meals in restaurants afterwards. When an uncle died, his post service meal was in a monastery. It had a pleasantly austere feel with bare wood tables.

    I have probably said may be a bit too often. I learned when 'funeral' is attached to a recipe, it connotes it feeds a lot of people rather than what I expected: just for funerals.

    My Dad has advised he would like a meal in the church meeting hall. Well, I guess so, maybe, but I guess it depends on how I feel. I have the feeling the underlying wish is I am making this meal. Of course, he believes he will live to 600 and this may never, ever be my problem.

    I am still so glad I attended Kenji's wake with a smoker in the funeral home parking lot. Delicious Bahn Mi sandwiches filled with BBQ brisket from his smoker. It was quite inspiring. So much of his personality was present, and I had never met him before in the flesh.

    For years, I have been thinking of doing a program on funeral food.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #39 - December 10th, 2018, 1:40 pm
    Post #39 - December 10th, 2018, 1:40 pm Post #39 - December 10th, 2018, 1:40 pm
    Being from a small area in the UP, they typically always have a luncheon at the Church Hall afterwards. My Mother passed this summer and the church ladies put together a big potluck style luncheon that was great. This is very typical. You can judge the age of the deceased by checking if the have lime jello with shredded carrots in it. An old staple that we still chuckle at.
  • Post #40 - April 30th, 2019, 7:36 am
    Post #40 - April 30th, 2019, 7:36 am Post #40 - April 30th, 2019, 7:36 am
    The Food Chain – Raw Grief and Widowed
    Airs on: BBC World Service

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3cswpmz

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3cswpn0
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #41 - April 30th, 2019, 8:13 am
    Post #41 - April 30th, 2019, 8:13 am Post #41 - April 30th, 2019, 8:13 am
    The serendipitous proximity of EJ's on Skokie Boulevard to its funeral home neighbor practically begs for a quick post-visitation detour to enjoy their spectacular grilled calamari and hoist one for my homies.
  • Post #42 - April 30th, 2019, 8:34 am
    Post #42 - April 30th, 2019, 8:34 am Post #42 - April 30th, 2019, 8:34 am
    Seeing that I went through this virtually yesterday...I think I can add some perspective.

    Maybe it's partially because we're Italian, but even before my parents passed, a major component of the funeral plans was 'where are we gonna eat afterwards?'

    Full disclosure--an idea was bandied about to fete the funeral-goers at my folks' favorite geriatric dining hangout: Dover Straits in Mundelein. I said no, no, a thousand times no...because although the food is pretty good (and the earlybird specials with the salad 'boat' are decidedly a value) I knew a lot of the group would covertly judge the experience from an 'enjoyment' standpoint--believe it or not--and how they're fed is oh, so important. Ironic & kind of morbid but true.

    So I nixed that and after their military burial (Dad was retired WWII Air Force and the ceremony was incredibly impressive, regardless of your view on the Armed Forces), we had a luncheon for 65 at Francesca's Tavola in Arlington Heights, actually their 'bereavement menu'.

    10 out of 10? No, probably an 8 overall but the service was top notch, the quality solid but not spectacular. I seem to have seen a lot of rigatoni with vodka sauce lately, but this version was really tasty & not too thick. And I'm not a fan of family-style serving, but replacement of empty plates with full ones was frequent and unobtrusively done.

    Interesting concept at Francesca's for inadvertently overstating the number of expected guests. For example, if you tell them 60 people and only 50 show, they've already cooked for 60, thus they will split the difference with you, charging for 55 people, but payer gets to bring all the extra wine and food home. I think that's fair.

    Francesca's in the end was high strata chain restaurant fare, which is not always a bad thing under these circumstances. It served our purpose and was reasonable at about $40 per person including alcohol and tip.

    Oh, BTW, at the funeral home they provided coffee, and some of the people in the funeral party brought coffeecakes and donuts for beforehand.
    Last edited by jnm123 on April 30th, 2019, 8:57 am, edited 2 times in total.
  • Post #43 - April 30th, 2019, 8:47 am
    Post #43 - April 30th, 2019, 8:47 am Post #43 - April 30th, 2019, 8:47 am
    jnm123 wrote: (Dad was retired WWII Air Force and the ceremony was incredibly impressive, regardless of your view on the Armed Forces)

    My view, I'm happy there are folks such as you dad and I thank him for his service. Condolences on your loss.
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #44 - April 30th, 2019, 9:44 am
    Post #44 - April 30th, 2019, 9:44 am Post #44 - April 30th, 2019, 9:44 am
    jnm123 wrote:Interesting concept at Francesca's for inadvertently overstating the number of expected guests. For example, if you tell them 60 people and only 50 show, they've already cooked for 60, thus they will split the difference with you, charging for 55 people, but payer gets to bring all the extra wine and food home. I think that's fair.

    Hi,

    My Dad has a widowed friend who was very disappointed by the no-shows at her husband's post funeral luncheon. He's been dead for five years and it still eats her up.

    Prior to her experience, my Dad sometimes went to the post funeral luncheon and sometimes not. Now he goes every time, because he learned this is meaningful to the family.

    ***

    Jay - I'm very sorry about the loss of your parents.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast

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