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Never Eaten That! Whaa...?
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  • Post #31 - August 19th, 2008, 11:33 am
    Post #31 - August 19th, 2008, 11:33 am Post #31 - August 19th, 2008, 11:33 am
    Pie Lady wrote:
    12345ne wrote:There are a number of foods that I will retry ever few years to see if I like them: any type of melon, pickles (or cucumbers for that matter), lobster, oysters. I still don't like any of those.


    My friend! I hate melon too! Yes, even watermelon.


    But the key is that you've tried them! I found your other examples to be interesting because (in at least the case of the apricots) you'd developed an opinion about them without actually ever tasting them.
  • Post #32 - August 19th, 2008, 11:47 am
    Post #32 - August 19th, 2008, 11:47 am Post #32 - August 19th, 2008, 11:47 am
    Among the more common veggies, I haven't eaten brussel sprouts, rutabagas, Swiss chard, or sorrel. Looking at this list of vegetables, there's even more that I haven't eaten than I thought. :oops: Don't even get started on the fruit!

    Stevez, have you eaten anything else at McDonald's, or just not a burger? I'm actually jealous of anyone who's been spared anything at McDonald's (except their fountain Coke- I didn't notice it until someone else pointed it out, but whatever mixture they use in the fountains seems to be better and unique from any other place- perfectly fizzy, nicely sweet, even with the HFCS.)

    I'm curious about the milkshake-less life you've led, janschher. Lactose-intolerant?

    Meat-wise, I've had beef, pork, chicken, turkey, duck, lamb, buffalo. No ostrich, elk, boar, alligator, rattlesnake, pheasant, squab, ortolan, etc. Of the ones I've tried, I've never done any organ meats. I think if I wasn't told it was organ meat, I probably would eat it, but I don't know if it's something I'd seek out. Actually, I had liver once, when my grandfather ordered liver & onions in a restaurant, but I didn't really like it.

    Seafood, I've had relatively little. Tried eel, wasn't my thing. Love sushi, but I stick to salmon, tuna, shellfish, etc. Don't know why. I've had red snapper sashimi, but it just didn't taste like much to me. I love octopus and squid (only had it as corfu salad and calamari, though.) I've never had snails. I tried raw oysters and the texture was just not my thing. I've had them in stuffing and seafood stew, and it was fine in there.

    Texture isn't usually a big deal for me, but there are some extreme examples- raw oysters; my mom made a spaghetti sauce with chopped bacon in it that was just...wrong. I have a friend who doesn't like any pudding-like textures. We once convinced him to try creme brulee at an Italian restaurant, because what's not to like, and he just about turned green.

    Is it kona crab that's really difficult to eat because of all the shell fragments you have to work around? I ordered it once at Bob Chinn's and Bob happened to be passing by- he stopped and said I must be up for a challenge. If chicken wings and cherries are too much work, I'd advise against the Kona crab!

    I knew about pluots, but I didn't know about all those other variations- fascinating!
  • Post #33 - August 19th, 2008, 12:15 pm
    Post #33 - August 19th, 2008, 12:15 pm Post #33 - August 19th, 2008, 12:15 pm
    Annabelle raises an interesting point -- how many lthers might enjoy trying new foods if they could be part of a group that includes coaches?

    Perhaps a series of events could be scheduled where the purpose is to help people who have never eaten something learn from people who have.

    For example, the first session might be seafood and the lesson would be: how to order and eat lobster, crab, clams, mussels and oysters -- both raw and cooked (talk about your different textures!). The reward for the newcomers is obvious, but think about how much fun it would be for the coaches to see people enjoy something for the first time.

    Pick a casual place, where everyone can dig in and get messy. Sounds like fun.
  • Post #34 - August 19th, 2008, 12:28 pm
    Post #34 - August 19th, 2008, 12:28 pm Post #34 - August 19th, 2008, 12:28 pm
    jimwdavis wrote:Annabelle raises an interesting point -- how many lthers might enjoy trying new foods if they could be part of a group that includes coaches?

    Perhaps a series of events could be scheduled where the purpose is to help people who have never eaten something learn from people who have.

    For example, the first session might be seafood and the lesson would be: how to order and eat lobster, crab, clams, mussels and oysters -- both raw and cooked (talk about your different textures!). The reward for the newcomers is obvious, but think about how much fun it would be for the coaches to see people enjoy something for the first time.

    Pick a casual place, where everyone can dig in and get messy. Sounds like fun.


    Finances permitting, I'd totally be up for "beginner's nights"!
  • Post #35 - August 19th, 2008, 12:54 pm
    Post #35 - August 19th, 2008, 12:54 pm Post #35 - August 19th, 2008, 12:54 pm
    Timing permitting, I'd be very happy to be schooled in the art of various foods by people here. :)
  • Post #36 - August 19th, 2008, 1:09 pm
    Post #36 - August 19th, 2008, 1:09 pm Post #36 - August 19th, 2008, 1:09 pm
    jimwdavis wrote:Finances permitting, I'd totally be up for "beginner's nights"!


    Me too! Include apricots. :)
    I want to have a good body, but not as much as I want dessert. ~ Jason Love

    There is no pie in Nighthawks, which is why it's such a desolate image. ~ Happy Stomach

    I write fiction. You can find me—and some stories—on Facebook, Twitter and my website.
  • Post #37 - August 19th, 2008, 4:03 pm
    Post #37 - August 19th, 2008, 4:03 pm Post #37 - August 19th, 2008, 4:03 pm
    Just wanted to post "The Omnivore's Hundred" that's been making its way around the blogs:

    originally from http://www.verygoodtaste.co.uk/
    Not doing too bad with the list, actually.

    1. Venison
    2. Nettle tea
    3. Huevos rancheros
    4. Steak tartare
    5. Crocodile
    6. Black pudding
    7. Cheese fondue
    8. Carp
    9. Borscht
    10. Baba ghanoush
    11. Calamari
    12. Pho
    13. PB&J sandwich
    14. Aloo gobi
    15. Hot dog from a street cart
    16. Epoisses
    17. Black truffle
    18. Fruit wine made from something other than grapes
    19. Steamed pork buns
    20. Pistachio ice cream
    21. Heirloom tomatoes
    22. Fresh wild berries
    23. Foie gras
    24. Rice and beans
    25. Brawn, or head cheese
    26. Raw Scotch Bonnet pepper
    27. Dulce de leche
    28. Oysters
    29. Baklava
    30. Bagna cauda
    31. Wasabi peas
    32. Clam chowder in a sourdough bowl
    33. Salted lassi
    34. Sauerkraut
    35. Root beer float
    36. Cognac with a fat cigar
    37. Clotted cream tea
    38. Vodka jelly/Jell-O
    39. Gumbo
    40. Oxtail
    41. Curried goat
    42. Whole insects
    43. Phaal
    44. Goat’s milk
    45. Malt whisky from a bottle worth £60/$120 or more
    46. Fugu
    47. Chicken tikka masala
    48. Eel
    49. Krispy Kreme original glazed doughnut
    50. Sea urchin
    51. Prickly pear
    52. Umeboshi
    53. Abalone
    54. Paneer
    55. McDonald’s Big Mac Meal
    56. Spaetzle
    57. Dirty gin martini
    58. Beer above 8% ABV
    59. Poutine
    60. Carob chips
    61. S’mores
    62. Sweetbreads
    63. Kaolin
    64. Currywurst
    65. Durian
    66. Frogs’ legs
    67. Beignets, churros, elephant ears or funnel cake
    68. Haggis
    69. Fried plantain
    70. Chitterlings, or andouillette
    71. Gazpacho
    72. Caviar and blini
    73. Louche absinthe
    74. Gjetost, or brunost
    75. Roadkill
    76. Baijiu
    77. Hostess Fruit Pie
    78. Snail
    79. Lapsang souchong
    80. Bellini
    81. Tom yum
    82. Eggs Benedict
    83. Pocky
    84. Tasting menu at a three-Michelin-star restaurant.
    85. Kobe beef
    86. Hare
    87. Goulash
    88. Flowers
    89. Horse
    90. Criollo chocolate
    91. Spam
    92. Soft shell crab
    93. Rose harissa
    94. Catfish
    95. Mole poblano
    96. Bagel and lox
    97. Lobster Thermidor
    98. Polenta
    99. Jamaican Blue Mountain coffee
    100. Snake
  • Post #38 - August 19th, 2008, 5:03 pm
    Post #38 - August 19th, 2008, 5:03 pm Post #38 - August 19th, 2008, 5:03 pm
    Hi,

    What I have not eaten on that list:

    2. Nettle tea (I probably have, just not 100% sure)
    26. Raw Scotch Bonnet pepper
    36. Cognac with a fat cigar
    38. Vodka jelly/Jell-O
    43. Phaal
    45. Malt whisky from a bottle worth £60/$120 or more
    46. Fugu
    57. Dirty gin martini
    63. Kaolin (what is this???)
    74. Gjetost, or brunost
    80. Bellini
    93. Rose harissa
    99. Jamaican Blue Mountain coffee

    Most of what I have not tried falls mostly into the categories I don't especially favor: alcohol, coffee and capsaicin. Fugu and Gjetost have not been tried because they simply haven't crossed my path. Now if someone could explain what is Kaolin, I would appreciate it.

    My score: 87%

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #39 - August 19th, 2008, 5:14 pm
    Post #39 - August 19th, 2008, 5:14 pm Post #39 - August 19th, 2008, 5:14 pm
    I think kaolin is a type of clay, not uncommonly consumed by people with geophagia. It's also used in some toothpastes. Also, if you've ever taken Kaopectate ...
  • Post #40 - August 19th, 2008, 5:42 pm
    Post #40 - August 19th, 2008, 5:42 pm Post #40 - August 19th, 2008, 5:42 pm
    What is phaal? Baiju?
    Except for these, roadkill, insects, and clay*, I think I've covered the list. That is, unless rose harissa is made from actual roses.

    * Does Play-doh count? Love it.
    Man : I can't understand how a poet like you can eat that stuff.
    T. S. Eliot: Ah, but you're not a poet.
  • Post #41 - August 19th, 2008, 7:00 pm
    Post #41 - August 19th, 2008, 7:00 pm Post #41 - August 19th, 2008, 7:00 pm
    Annabelle wrote:Timing permitting, I'd be very happy to be schooled in the art of various foods by people here. :)


    Ask and you shall (maybe) receive: Lobster College!
  • Post #42 - August 19th, 2008, 8:56 pm
    Post #42 - August 19th, 2008, 8:56 pm Post #42 - August 19th, 2008, 8:56 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:
    My score: 87%



    How was the roadkill? Raccoon or Rabbit? You're not cheating with the Moto roadkill, are you?
  • Post #43 - August 19th, 2008, 9:23 pm
    Post #43 - August 19th, 2008, 9:23 pm Post #43 - August 19th, 2008, 9:23 pm
    Hi,

    Long before I knew any of you, I was driving on a country road between here and Champaign. There was a freshly killed female pheasant on the road. Fresh enough her blood was still wet. I picked her up the tail and put it in the trunk.

    Cathy2 of January 31, 2006 wrote:I did a bit of amateur taxidermy some years ago. I came across a road kill pheasant, which I carefully extracted from its' feathers. I then called a taxidermist* who kindly explained how to prepare the carcass. For my feathered beast it meant washing it with Dawn dishwashing detergent, then blow drying it with a drier. Remove as much protein as possible, then packing it with Borox including a dusting of the feathers to diminish interest by insects. After 6 weeks on the front enclosed porch it was ready to hang. I've had it 13-14 years without it dropping one feather.


    The next day I cooked the pheasant's meat. So yes, I did eat genuine roadkill collected fresh from the road.

    *It still amazes me to this day the taxidermist didn't yell something unpleasant and hang up on me.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #44 - August 19th, 2008, 10:03 pm
    Post #44 - August 19th, 2008, 10:03 pm Post #44 - August 19th, 2008, 10:03 pm
    2. Nettle tea
    8. Carp
    17. Black truffle
    26. Raw Scotch Bonnet pepper
    30. Bagna cauda
    38. Vodka jelly/Jell-O
    43. Phaal
    45. Malt whisky from a bottle worth £60/$120 or more
    46. Fugu
    58. Beer above 8% ABV
    63. Kaolin
    64. Currywurst
    68. Haggis
    73. Louche absinthe
    76. Baijiu
    80. Bellini
    84. Tasting menu at a three-Michelin-star restaurant.
    85. Kobe beef
    93. Rose harissa
    99. Jamaican Blue Mountain coffee
    100. Snake

    If I can count alligator as crocodile and a few other slight differences, I'm at a paltry 80% - much of the shortages on my predicated by economics (though I also don't do spicy, though for some reason I like Scotch Bonnets and might be willing to take that on) and several left on the list I've wanted to try but haven't had the opportunity.

    However, it's a big world, and there's a lot of things to try - I've always made an effort to try as many new foods as possible - I've been trying to find snake for a while (still annoyed I missed that particular GNR dinner!) I also go back and try things I don't like periodically, in case my tastes change.
  • Post #45 - August 19th, 2008, 10:41 pm
    Post #45 - August 19th, 2008, 10:41 pm Post #45 - August 19th, 2008, 10:41 pm
    Mhays wrote:
    I've always made an effort to try as many new foods as possible.



    Like...roadkill!

    So what's your story?
  • Post #46 - August 19th, 2008, 10:47 pm
    Post #46 - August 19th, 2008, 10:47 pm Post #46 - August 19th, 2008, 10:47 pm
    Not many things I've missed on that list:

    14. Aloo gobi
    25. Brawn, or head cheese
    33. Salted lassi
    36. Cognac with a fat cigar
    42. Whole insects
    43. Phaal
    46. Fugu
    50. Sea urchin
    54. Paneer
    55. McDonald’s Big Mac Meal
    59. Poutine
    62. Sweetbreads
    63. Kaolin
    64. Currywurst
    65. Durian
    70. Chitterlings, or andouillette
    73. Louche absinthe
    75. Roadkill
    76. Baijiu
    89. Horse
    90. Criollo chocolate
    93. Rose harissa

    Nope - never had a Big Mac. The only thing I eat at McDonald's is the Filet o' Fish, with the accompanying fries. Very tasty, if you're in the right frame of mind. :wink:
  • Post #47 - August 20th, 2008, 5:54 am
    Post #47 - August 20th, 2008, 5:54 am Post #47 - August 20th, 2008, 5:54 am
    I think it would be quicker to list the things I *have* eaten on that list; I've only tried 31 of them. :oops: I'm going to get myself kicked off LTH with confessions like that, aren't I?
  • Post #48 - August 20th, 2008, 7:06 am
    Post #48 - August 20th, 2008, 7:06 am Post #48 - August 20th, 2008, 7:06 am
    Me too- Annabelle. Here's what I have eaten:

    1. Venison
    4. Steak tartare
    7. Cheese fondue
    9. Borscht
    10. Baba ghanoush
    11. Calamari
    12. Pho
    13. PB&J sandwich
    15. Hot dog from a street cart
    18. Fruit wine made from something other than grapes
    19. Steamed pork buns
    20. Pistachio ice cream
    21. Heirloom tomatoes
    22. Fresh wild berries
    24. Rice and beans
    27. Dulce de leche
    28. Oysters
    29. Baklava-- made it myself, in fact!
    31. Wasabi peas
    32. Clam chowder in a sourdough bowl
    34. Sauerkraut
    35. Root beer float
    38. Vodka jelly/Jell-O
    39. Gumbo
    41. Curried goat
    47. Chicken tikka masala
    48. Eel
    49. Krispy Kreme original glazed doughnut
    54. Paneer
    55. McDonald’s Big Mac Meal
    56. Spaetzle
    58. Beer above 8% ABV
    61. S’mores
    67. Beignets, churros, elephant ears or funnel cake
    69. Fried plantain
    71. Gazpacho
    77. Hostess Fruit Pie
    81. Tom yum
    82. Eggs Benedict
    83. Pocky
    87. Goulash
    88. Flowers
    92. Soft shell crab
    94. Catfish
    96. Bagel and lox
    98. Polenta

    A little less than half- better than I thought I'd do....it counts if you only had a bite or two, right? I think I've had one piece of eel and didn't really like it, as I mentioned before.
  • Post #49 - August 20th, 2008, 8:12 am
    Post #49 - August 20th, 2008, 8:12 am Post #49 - August 20th, 2008, 8:12 am
    OK, I do have to admit I don't have C2's roadkill story, and yes; that's one of the ones I'd be giving a loose definition, so I don't have a story about something I killed with my car. I have, however, foraged by the side of the road for for fish, frogs, crayfish and various veggie goodies. And who can say how Cathy2's racoon met its demise, right?

    My mother has a terrific story from when she was growing up: they hit an armadillo with the car, got out, collected it, and tossed it in the trunk to dress when they got home. They opened the trunk, only to find the critter had disappeared...a search of the area found him quite alive, hiding inside the spare tire.

    He was invited for dinner.
  • Post #50 - August 20th, 2008, 8:13 am
    Post #50 - August 20th, 2008, 8:13 am Post #50 - August 20th, 2008, 8:13 am
    Me three. Things I've eaten:

    1. Venison
    5. Crocodile (just one bite, but still!)
    7. Cheese fondue
    10. Baba ghanoush
    11. Calamari
    12. Pho
    13. PB&J sandwich
    15. Hot dog from a street cart
    19. Steamed pork buns
    20. Pistachio ice cream
    22. Fresh wild berries
    23. Foie gras (if sausage counts)
    24. Rice and beans
    27. Dulce de leche
    29. Baklava
    34. Sauerkraut
    35. Root beer float
    39. Gumbo
    40. Oxtail
    41. Curried Goat
    47. Chicken tikka masala
    49. Krispy Kreme original glazed doughnut
    60. Carob chips
    56. Spaetzle
    61. S’mores
    65. Durian
    67. Beignets, churros, elephant ears - not funnel cake
    69. Fried plantain
    71. Gazpacho
    77. Hostess Fruit Pie (but the chocolate pudding one is best!)
    82. Eggs Benedict
    85. Kobe beef
    87. Goulash
    88. Flowers
    91. Spam
    94. Catfish
    96. Bagel and lox
    98. Polenta

    And I've had clam chowder and sourdough bowls, caviar and blini, just not together, so does that count as things I've eaten?

    Still, pretty sad.
    I want to have a good body, but not as much as I want dessert. ~ Jason Love

    There is no pie in Nighthawks, which is why it's such a desolate image. ~ Happy Stomach

    I write fiction. You can find me—and some stories—on Facebook, Twitter and my website.
  • Post #51 - August 20th, 2008, 8:27 am
    Post #51 - August 20th, 2008, 8:27 am Post #51 - August 20th, 2008, 8:27 am
    Ill chime in, the ones I have eaten on the "list", 41 items.

    1) Venison
    3) Huevos Rancheros
    5) Crocodile
    7) Cheese Fondu
    11) Calamari
    13) PB & J Sandwich
    15) Hot Dog from a street cart
    17) Black Truffle
    19) Steamed Pok Buns
    20) Pistachio Ice Cream
    21) Heirloom Tomatoes
    22) Fresh wild berries
    24) Rice and Beans
    26) Raw Scotch Bonnet Peppers
    27) Dulce de Leche
    28) Oysters
    29) baklava
    32) Calm Chowder in a sourdough bowl
    34) sauerkraut
    35) rootbeer float
    36) Vodka Jello
    39) Gumbo
    44) Goats Milk
    49) Krispy Cream
    55) Big Mac Meal
    61) smores
    66) frog's legs
    67) beignets, churros, elephant ears, funnel cake
    69) fried plantain
    71) gazpacho
    72) caviar
    77) hostess fruit pie
    82) eggs bennedict
    85) kobe beef
    87) goulash
    88) flowers
    92) soft shell crab
    94) catfish
    95) mole poblano
    97) lobster thermidor
    98) polenta
  • Post #52 - August 20th, 2008, 8:32 am
    Post #52 - August 20th, 2008, 8:32 am Post #52 - August 20th, 2008, 8:32 am
    Woohoo! A purity test for food nerds! Shallow and mostly meaningless but still fun! It's like I'm 14 again :-)

    My omissions:

    2. Nettle tea
    36. Cognac with a fat cigar
    38. Vodka jelly/Jell-O
    45. Malt whisky from a bottle worth £60/$120 or more
    63. Kaolin
    68. Haggis
    73. Louche absinthe
    74. Gjetost, or brunost
    75. Roadkill
    89. Horse
    93. Rose harissa

    89%. Unless we're considering alligator and crocodile distinct (I realize they are from a biological standpoint), in which case 88%.

    Spicy fried snake in China was awesome. Fugu was... a fish (the version I had was in a soup).
    Dominic Armato
    Dining Critic
    The Arizona Republic and azcentral.com
  • Post #53 - August 20th, 2008, 8:57 am
    Post #53 - August 20th, 2008, 8:57 am Post #53 - August 20th, 2008, 8:57 am
    I'm ambivalent. I'm enjoying reading everybody's lists (and roadkill stories!), but another part of me wants to say to the guy that made the list, "Who the hell are you to say I'm not well-rounded if I haven't eaten these foods!?!?!?" It's like that "cultural literacy" book that came out in the nineties, which said you couldn't consider yourself an acceptable member of society without a passing familiarity with the checklist. I know it's all in fun (and the guy himself doesn't mean his list to be taken too seriously), but the grumpy curmudgeon inside me is getting rubbed the wrong way.
  • Post #54 - August 20th, 2008, 9:02 am
    Post #54 - August 20th, 2008, 9:02 am Post #54 - August 20th, 2008, 9:02 am
    No eaten:

    30. Bagna cauda
    46. Fugu
    52. Umeboshi
    63. Kaolin
    75. Roadkill
    80. Bellini
    84. Tasting menu at a three-Michelin-star restaurant.
    90. Criollo chocolate
    93. Rose harissa
    97. Lobster Thermidor
    99. Jamaican Blue Mountain coffee (Blue Mountain "style" is as close as I've gotten)
    100. Snake

    So 88% here. Is there any place in Chicago that has snake on the menu? I've always been curious about it.
  • Post #55 - August 20th, 2008, 9:11 am
    Post #55 - August 20th, 2008, 9:11 am Post #55 - August 20th, 2008, 9:11 am
    Josephine wrote:What is phaal? Baiju?


    Phaal--at least if it's what I'm thinking of, though I've seen it spelled phal or phall--is an ultra-hot curry, hotter than vindaloo. I don't think I've ever seen it on an American menu, but it's quite common in the UK.

    Baiju is a Chinese alcoholic drink--I think of it as Chinese vodka.

    Oh, and if anyone's curious about gjetost, it's pretty easy to find across the border in Wisconsin. I think it's rather lovely--sort of what you would get by crossing a mild semi-soft cheese with plain (non-chocolate) fudge. Is there anyone here who has gjetost? I don't think I've ever found it in Chicago.
  • Post #56 - August 20th, 2008, 9:20 am
    Post #56 - August 20th, 2008, 9:20 am Post #56 - August 20th, 2008, 9:20 am
    Binko wrote:Oh, and if anyone's curious about gjetost, it's pretty easy to find across the border in Wisconsin. I think it's rather lovely--sort of what you would get by crossing a mild semi-soft cheese with plain (non-chocolate) fudge. Is there anyone here who has gjetost? I don't think I've ever found it in Chicago.

    Binko,

    A quick google of gjetost popped up this blog with a picture I immediately recognized as having seen Sunday at Marion Street Cheese Market. Jazzfood recommended purchase, but I become distracted and did not purchase.

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    Marion Street Cheese Market
    100 S. Marion, Oak Park
    708-848-2088
    Open every day, 9AM-9PM
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #57 - August 20th, 2008, 9:26 am
    Post #57 - August 20th, 2008, 9:26 am Post #57 - August 20th, 2008, 9:26 am
    Mhays wrote:I have, however, foraged by the side of the road for for fish, frogs, crayfish and various veggie goodies.


    Where I grew up, we called that hunting. Or rustling depending on how the neighbors define livestock. It seems that you'd have to kill something with a vehicle to meet the roadkill definition, although I compliment you on creative foraging.

    That said, I think a lot of the things on this list are silly (who really cares if you've eaten a Big Mac or not) but the one thing that I would REALLY like to try is a good haggis. Anywhere around here that it can be found?
  • Post #58 - August 20th, 2008, 10:07 am
    Post #58 - August 20th, 2008, 10:07 am Post #58 - August 20th, 2008, 10:07 am
    Binko wrote:So 88% here. Is there any place in Chicago that has snake on the menu? I've always been curious about it.


    Casa de Samuel in Little Village has rattlesnake on the menu. Don't know if it's always available, but I suspect it's frozen, and so should be.
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #59 - August 20th, 2008, 10:28 am
    Post #59 - August 20th, 2008, 10:28 am Post #59 - August 20th, 2008, 10:28 am
    gleam wrote:
    Binko wrote:So 88% here. Is there any place in Chicago that has snake on the menu? I've always been curious about it.


    Casa de Samuel in Little Village has rattlesnake on the menu. Don't know if it's always available, but I suspect it's frozen, and so should be.


    We had a smoked rattlesnake sausage with blueberry crème sauce and smoked gouda at Hot Doug's on the Tour de France LTH-style.
  • Post #60 - August 20th, 2008, 11:43 am
    Post #60 - August 20th, 2008, 11:43 am Post #60 - August 20th, 2008, 11:43 am
    Like the superfoods list, it skims the surface, and includes a lot of stuff that doesn't seem really important to me - there's also a lot of things (criollo chocolate) that you may have eaten without being aware; check your recent high-end chocolate purchases.

    I've never forgotten this scene in Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom:

    The women bring in a bowl from which they scoop tiny portions of grey gruel onto three plates. To this the women add a few grains of yellowed rice and a withered ,molding piece of fruit. Willie looks aghast at the unappetizing combination.

    WILLIE
    (quietly)
    God, I am starving, but I can't eat this...
    INDIANA
    That's more food than these people eat in a week.
    (pointedly)
    They're starving, too...


    It's an odd bit of movie to have affected me so, but I never want to be that kind of American, no matter where I am; to me, that means I need to learn as much as I can about food whenever I have a chance - if I don't like something, at least I can say so with experience, but I've yet to meet a food I can't somehow choke down. Of course, the upside is that I've met many a food that's become a friend for life...

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