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Warning: Pyrex has been reformulated and is dangerous

Warning: Pyrex has been reformulated and is dangerous
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  • Post #31 - September 16th, 2012, 3:20 pm
    Post #31 - September 16th, 2012, 3:20 pm Post #31 - September 16th, 2012, 3:20 pm
    http://afarmerinohio.blogspot.com/2011/04/how-reformulating-pyrex-made-crack.html
    Borosilicate Was what I was trying to remember. They still use that formula in Europe from what I remember.
  • Post #32 - May 10th, 2013, 7:23 am
    Post #32 - May 10th, 2013, 7:23 am Post #32 - May 10th, 2013, 7:23 am
    Cynthia linked to this on facebook, I thought it was interesting:



    BTW - my pyrex quart measuring cup recently broke when a mug fell on it. I am using now a silicon quart measuring cup, which I had rarely used prior to this.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
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  • Post #33 - May 10th, 2013, 7:39 pm
    Post #33 - May 10th, 2013, 7:39 pm Post #33 - May 10th, 2013, 7:39 pm
    Corning Ware isn't Pyrex and doesn't advertise itself as such, but I thought of this thread (and ironically, forgot all the caveats I posted on page 1), when I cracked up my mother's ( :( ) 9 x 13 Corning Ware casserole dish the other day. Sad because it was my mother's. Sad because it was 9 x 13, which is a very useful and not-so-easy-to-find size.

    What I did was put some beef ribs in the dish and roast them in a very hot oven for a half hour or so. Then I took the dish out of the oven, en route to covering the ribs with foil and turning the oven down to roast them at a longer temperature for a while, put the dish down on the stovetop on top of a burner ... whaddyacallem? Burner guard? The star-shaped thing that your pan sits on above the burner... anyway.

    I took the intensely hot Corning Ware glass casserole dish out of the oven, put it on the cold burner guard, decided I should add some liquid to the bottom of the dish, poured in some cold water, and POW! The dish cracked in a star-shaped pattern into a half a dozen or so big pieces, mostly in lines coinciding with the arms on the burner guard. It was rather impressive that it fractured into such large pieces. It was also rather impressive how long it took the glass fragments to cool off enough to be safe to handle and throw out.

    I miss that casserole dish. It was big and shallow, creamy white like milk, with red decorations on the side, including a red bird that reminded me of the Piasa bird, near where my mom was from.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #34 - February 26th, 2019, 7:38 pm
    Post #34 - February 26th, 2019, 7:38 pm Post #34 - February 26th, 2019, 7:38 pm
    Hi,

    I saw this NBC 5 Chicago report on Pyrex: https://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/Pyrex ... 17881.html

    At 2:20, they show two baking dishes side by side. The dish on the left has a green tinge (made of soda lime glass) and the one on the right is clear (made of borosilicate). Both were filled with sand and heated to 450 degrees for an extended period of time. When removed from the oven, they were placed on a wet tile. The green tinged glass exploded due to thermal shock. The white glass under the same conditions cracked.

    At home, I always place a towel or potholder underneath glass cookware exiting the oven. I never heat glass cookware to 450 degrees, I go up to 375 degrees or switch to a metal dish.

    I have had Visionware as cooking pots, which are made with a low expansion glass. It can break, though it cracked rather than exploded.

    It's good to finally know what to look for in the type of glass.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways,
  • Post #35 - March 16th, 2019, 1:03 pm
    Post #35 - March 16th, 2019, 1:03 pm Post #35 - March 16th, 2019, 1:03 pm
    Interesting article over on Gizmodo.

    Within the article there's a reference to being able to buy borosilicate products from Amazon Basics for cheaper than the domestic lime-soda Pyrex product. However when I read through the reviews there were many reports of shattering and people disputing that it's actually borosilicate. In any case I found that OXO, a company in which I do have some trust, has a line of products they claim IS made of borosilicate and even advertise it as being freezer-to-oven safe (though I still don't think I'd do that).

    "What does seem crystal clear on a scientific level is that borosilicate glass is less prone to thermal shock that soda lime glass. It’s also not hard to find, especially if you can live without the Pyrex logo being stamped on the bottom of your pan. Heck, Amazon Basics sells a pair of borosilicate glass pans for $15. The equivalent Pyrex-branded set made of tempered soda-lime glass costs $22. And according to experts, the Pyrex glass can explode into small pieces. Uncommon as these explosions may be, they sound bad."
    Objects in mirror appear to be losing.
  • Post #36 - March 16th, 2019, 1:52 pm
    Post #36 - March 16th, 2019, 1:52 pm Post #36 - March 16th, 2019, 1:52 pm
    Hi,

    You may want to look at the video clip in my post just above yours for a 'as seen on tv' demonstration of how one glass cracks and the other breaks into small pieces. Once you have seen it, you will avoid the green hued soda lime glass for baking dishes.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways,
  • Post #37 - March 17th, 2019, 2:44 am
    Post #37 - March 17th, 2019, 2:44 am Post #37 - March 17th, 2019, 2:44 am
    All of our Pyrex is pre-nuptual so it dates back to the late 1970s.

    We have been quietly acquiring the old Pyrex dishes and the like from estates and from relatives who are closing down their kitchens. Those I know have had these pyrex containers for 30-40 years minimum.
  • Post #38 - March 17th, 2019, 5:52 am
    Post #38 - March 17th, 2019, 5:52 am Post #38 - March 17th, 2019, 5:52 am
    jlawrence01 wrote:All of our Pyrex is pre-nuptual so it dates back to the late 1970s.

    We have been quietly acquiring the old Pyrex dishes and the like from estates and from relatives who are closing down their kitchens. Those I know have had these pyrex containers for 30-40 years minimum.

    It's still glass and it can break.

    I used for many years clear vision pots, which use a low-expansion glass. They would occasionally break, too. The most vulnerable location was the handle.

    Regards,
    Cathy2
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways,
  • Post #39 - May 16th, 2024, 9:54 pm
    Post #39 - May 16th, 2024, 9:54 pm Post #39 - May 16th, 2024, 9:54 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:
    jlawrence01 wrote:All of our Pyrex is pre-nuptual so it dates back to the late 1970s.

    We have been quietly acquiring the old Pyrex dishes and the like from estates and from relatives who are closing down their kitchens. Those I know have had these pyrex containers for 30-40 years minimum.

    It's still glass and it can break.

    I used for many years clear vision pots, which use a low-expansion glass. They would occasionally break, too. The most vulnerable location was the handle.

    Regards,
    Cathy2



    Well, tonight is happened. My large 9"x12" Anchor Hocking dish that is over 40 years old exploded.

    I preheated the oven to 350F. I placed four pork chops in the dish which was at room temperature and put the dish into the oven at 3:45 pm. In twenty minutes, the pan exploded.
  • Post #40 - May 16th, 2024, 10:33 pm
    Post #40 - May 16th, 2024, 10:33 pm Post #40 - May 16th, 2024, 10:33 pm
    Wow. That's scary. I have a fair bit of Pyrex. I don't think I've ever cooked anything at 450 degrees, but have used it at 350. When I watched the video, I thought just don't put it on a cool, wet surface (learned that in a high school physics class, though it was pouring cold water into a glass just out of the dishwasher). But blowing up in the oven set to 350 is definitely a worry. Everything cooks at that temperature, it seems.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #41 - May 17th, 2024, 8:33 am
    Post #41 - May 17th, 2024, 8:33 am Post #41 - May 17th, 2024, 8:33 am
    Wow, bet that was a mess to clean up. I've seen Pyrex & Anchor Hocking pans that have a lot of scratches from cutting and scouring - are those more likely to break?
  • Post #42 - May 17th, 2024, 2:34 pm
    Post #42 - May 17th, 2024, 2:34 pm Post #42 - May 17th, 2024, 2:34 pm
    tjr wrote:Wow, bet that was a mess to clean up. I've seen Pyrex & Anchor Hocking pans that have a lot of scratches from cutting and scouring - are those more likely to break?


    My wife purchased a guard to prevent spillages in the oven so the mess was pretty much contained. i removes all of the large pieces with tongs. Them we turned off the oven, waited an hour and then brought out all of the rest of the glass.

    In the meantime, I had to come up with a new entree for the ladies I cook for.

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