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Interesting obituaries

Interesting obituaries
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  • Post #31 - February 10th, 2011, 8:19 am
    Post #31 - February 10th, 2011, 8:19 am Post #31 - February 10th, 2011, 8:19 am
    sad to hear...spent more than a few nights at Marie's doing the same...RIP.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #32 - February 10th, 2011, 12:21 pm
    Post #32 - February 10th, 2011, 12:21 pm Post #32 - February 10th, 2011, 12:21 pm
    As did I boudreau. What a gal.

    So, shouldn't we say Marie, RIPtide?
  • Post #33 - February 10th, 2011, 2:44 pm
    Post #33 - February 10th, 2011, 2:44 pm Post #33 - February 10th, 2011, 2:44 pm
    Shasson wrote:So, shouldn't we say Marie, RIPtide?


    Well put!
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #34 - March 3rd, 2011, 10:46 pm
    Post #34 - March 3rd, 2011, 10:46 pm Post #34 - March 3rd, 2011, 10:46 pm
    HI,

    I have been reading obituaries regularly since I was 10-years-old. I was living with my Grandmother who had the Chicago Tribune delivered in the morning and Chicago Today in the afternoon. I read the major stories, columnists, looked at every page because there can be hidden gems, the comics, The Sisters: Dear Abby/Ann Landers, gossip columns, television and movie critics, obituaries and the personal ads. I was really good at current event trivia questions.

    I don't scan the small obit notices, though when I do I usually find someone I know or know indirectly. I prefer reading featured obituaries where people's accomplishments are revealed. Some of my favorites have been a neighborhood woman who made kolachky, another was the inventor of the grocery cart and yet another designed the cellophane wrapper that keeps cigarettes fresh.

    I remember reading Grace Kelly's obituary in Time magazine when the letters marched off the page. Yep, I was a bit under the influence.

    Usually obituaries are written by junior staff members. This evening, I read the best feature obituary I have ever read. It was about Bill Hoover who invented honey roasted peanuts. The reporter interviewed not only a family member, which is where most begin and end, he also talked to a work colleague.

    Food scientist's legacy is in your taste buds wrote:BY JOSH SHAFFER - STAFF WRITER

    RALEIGH -- Bill Hoover played with food.

    For most of his 94 years, he lorded over bubbling beakers in his basement lab, dabbling in cocktail sauce, fiddling with cheese spread, burrowing to the essence of sweet potatoes. Over his long career, most of it at N.C. State University, you could taste Hoover's work in Carolina Treet barbecue sauce or any number of three-bean salads.

    But Hoover, who died in Georgia this month, deserves a golden-brown monument on the National Mall for his greatest invention, a treat nibbled by many a coach-seated air traveler: the honey-roasted peanut.

    "He was very good," said Jesse Brown, a colleague at NCSU who is now retired from food science. "He would lay awake at night, from 4 a.m. till daybreak, coming up with ideas until dawn."

    Hoover's patent for honey-roasted nuts, granted in 1987, describes a messy, old-style method of glazing legumes.

    Pre-Hoover the nuts were coated before roasting, losing both color and flavor.

    Hoover-style nuts get roasted first, then coated with hot emulsified liquid when their temperature measures at least 160 but no more than 350 degrees. That way, they're not as sticky, and they stay fresher longer.

    "Every mother crow thinks her baby's blackest, but he was pretty incredible," said his daughter, Kathy Boyhan in Texas. "Anheuser-Busch bought the patent and paid my dad some royalties. It was pretty profitable."

    In the world of food science, Hoover stacked up higher than a triple-decker sandwich, but in his mind he was always a farm boy with a Ph.D.

    He grew up in Wrightsville, Ga., the youngest of 13 children, and he had to sit out the sixth grade to work the family farm. Food science was just an extension of a childhood spent pulling dinner out of the ground.

    In his lab, he made goodies taste better, look nicer, last longer.

    He turned his family into guinea pigs, feeding them samples. Boyhan lived a lab rat's life as his daughter, enduring so many experimental sweet potato patties that she swore off eating the starchy orange tubers until she turned 40.

    Their house on Merwin Road, with its basement lab, was a shrine to the science of snacks.

    "This man was doing things with soybeans before anybody knew what an edamame is," she said. "One year, he was the North Carolina 'yambassador.'"

    His laboratory, his rules

    It sounds like a whimsical occupation, tinkering with peanuts, looking for the recipe George Washington Carver missed. But Hoover was deadly serious about food research to the point of being strict. You did things his way in his lab.

    Once, a member of the Mt. Olive Pickle Co. family arrived wearing a beard. No beards in the lab, Hoover told him.

    Not that he was humorless. When Hoover retired from NCSU in 1982, after 25 years, he shunned the conservative, straight-laced ceremony being planned for him, explaining that he wouldn't attend any retirement dinner without a bar.

    Hoover died quietly in Georgia, without fanfare, Feb. 8.But snack-lovers owe him tribute, and when they dip their hands into the can and pull out a flavorful, nonsticky nut with just the right color, they might roll it around on the tongue a bit longer and consider the professor in Raleigh who worked so hard to make it dazzle.


    My admiration of this obituary was so strong, I even wrote the author to compliment it. If my obituary was written this well, I'd just be so thrilled. If, of course, I even was aware of it.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #35 - March 4th, 2011, 8:55 am
    Post #35 - March 4th, 2011, 8:55 am Post #35 - March 4th, 2011, 8:55 am
    Simply wonderful. Tnx for this C2.

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #36 - March 4th, 2011, 9:00 am
    Post #36 - March 4th, 2011, 9:00 am Post #36 - March 4th, 2011, 9:00 am
    Thanks for sharing this. I would have never seen it. The author of the obituary seems destined for other writing adventures. It was an awesome piece about an awesome guy.
  • Post #37 - March 4th, 2011, 9:26 am
    Post #37 - March 4th, 2011, 9:26 am Post #37 - March 4th, 2011, 9:26 am
    razbry wrote:Thanks for sharing this. I would have never seen it. The author of the obituary seems destined for other writing adventures. It was an awesome piece about an awesome guy.

    I'm glad you liked it, too.

    I sent a copy of this obit to John T. Edge at Southern Foodways suggesting he might be interested in the writer as well as the deceased.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #38 - March 14th, 2011, 8:57 am
    Post #38 - March 14th, 2011, 8:57 am Post #38 - March 14th, 2011, 8:57 am
    HI,

    Over the weekend, flags were half mast. When I called city hall to understand why, they had already deleted the memo. I learned half mast flags are declared by the President or Governor, though no local official may declare one.

    On March 15, 2011, flags will be half mast once more to honor the death of the last American veteran of World War One: Frank Buckles, Last WWI Doughboy, Dies At 110 In W.Va.

    He didn't seek the spotlight, but when Frank Buckles outlived every other American who'd served in World War I, he became what his biographer called "the humble patriot" and final torchbearer for the memory of that fading conflict.

    Buckles enlisted in World War I at 16 after lying about his age. He died Sunday on his farm in Charles Town, nearly a month after his 110th birthday. He had devoted the last years of his life to campaigning for greater recognition for his former comrades, prodding politicians to support a national memorial in Washington and working with friend and family spokesman David DeJonge on a biography.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #39 - March 14th, 2011, 12:09 pm
    Post #39 - March 14th, 2011, 12:09 pm Post #39 - March 14th, 2011, 12:09 pm
    Cathy -

    I'm confused - why were flags at half-mast this weekend? I noticed that one at the Winnetka fire station was on Sunday, and I've been wondering ever since. Thanks for any clarification.
  • Post #40 - March 15th, 2011, 2:29 pm
    Post #40 - March 15th, 2011, 2:29 pm Post #40 - March 15th, 2011, 2:29 pm
    sundevilpeg wrote:Cathy -

    I'm confused - why were flags at half-mast this weekend? I noticed that one at the Winnetka fire station was on Sunday, and I've been wondering ever since. Thanks for any clarification.

    I had to do a little seaching before I found out why.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #41 - April 6th, 2011, 6:52 am
    Post #41 - April 6th, 2011, 6:52 am Post #41 - April 6th, 2011, 6:52 am
    Bernard Clayton, bread baker and author of extraordinarily good books on the subject. A great loss.
    Gypsy Boy

    "I am not a glutton--I am an explorer of food." (Erma Bombeck)
  • Post #42 - May 3rd, 2011, 7:33 am
    Post #42 - May 3rd, 2011, 7:33 am Post #42 - May 3rd, 2011, 7:33 am
    Joan Steif Freehling was a fundraiser for Ravinia and editor of their cookbook Noteworthy.

    I knew Mrs. Freehling through one of her children. Many of the people in the area contributed to Ravinia's cookbook. When we were planning a party, my sister suggested contacting a neighbor for her Chinese chicken recipe. The answer to my query: go to Noteworthy for the recipe.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #43 - May 3rd, 2011, 7:41 am
    Post #43 - May 3rd, 2011, 7:41 am Post #43 - May 3rd, 2011, 7:41 am
    Pietro Ferrero, the co-chief executive of Ferrero SpA, died in a cycling accident in South Africa Monday, placing a question mark over the future direction of the candy maker behind Italy's iconic Nutella chocolate and hazelnut spread.

    The death of Mr. Ferrero delivers a blow to Italy's biggest chocolate maker. Although the executive shared the title of CEO with his brother Giovanni, 46, he was widely regarded inside the halls of Italian finance as the company's top manager. Mr. Ferrero was also viewed by bankers and analysts as a modernizing force in a company known for its insular management—a style that helped it hold onto secret candy recipes over the decades but hampered its efforts to grow through big acquisitions.
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #44 - May 3rd, 2011, 7:52 am
    Post #44 - May 3rd, 2011, 7:52 am Post #44 - May 3rd, 2011, 7:52 am
    Ruth Law, 1935-2011, Expert in Asian cuisine; acclaimed cookbook author

    What I really love about obituaries is learning the zig zag road people travel. Opportunity bred as much by happenstance instead of following the grand plan.

    In 1980, she [Ruth Law] went to the housewares show at McCormick Place and struck up a conversation with a wok manufacturer, Norman Ng.

    At the time, she had taken some cooking classes but had no other experience in the food world. She bought a wok and a cleaver and a Chinese cookbook on her way home.

    Shortly after their meeting, Ng asked her to do a cooking demonstration at a Cleveland cooking show for a crowd of more than 2,000.

    "Her encounter with Norman was the beginning of her career," said her son. "Taking classes led to teaching classes. Her touring Asia led to leading group tours to Asia that she created and promoted. She made all of the travel plans, made the reservations and wrote the brochures; and I stuffed the hundreds of envelopes to be mailed to her contacts."

    In 1980, she was approached by Contemporary Books in Chicago to write a Chinese cookbook titled "Dim Sum—Fast and Festive Chinese Cooking."
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #45 - May 3rd, 2011, 7:46 pm
    Post #45 - May 3rd, 2011, 7:46 pm Post #45 - May 3rd, 2011, 7:46 pm
    Cathy2....so true, life turns on a dime. Have you ever thought what you would like to see in your own obituary?
  • Post #46 - May 3rd, 2011, 11:15 pm
    Post #46 - May 3rd, 2011, 11:15 pm Post #46 - May 3rd, 2011, 11:15 pm
    razbry wrote:Cathy2....so true, life turns on a dime. Have you ever thought what you would like to see in your own obituary?

    I certainly have thought about this, though I won't be around to influence it.

    What I have been thinking about lately is what we do today and how it may be reflected in the future. John Drury, the writer not the television anchor, has long been a reference point for Chicago restaurants in the 1920's into the 1940's. Rene G has read through most of his personal papers at the Newberry Library. He's been dead over 40 years and yet his life's work is still of interest.

    By contrast, our website community has many people, viewpoints and levels of expertise. It would be interesting to know what will historians and scholars reference from this body of work called LTHforum. What themes, restaurants, dining and cooking trends and people will be important to them. Or will it all go poof and fade away.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #47 - May 9th, 2011, 12:29 pm
    Post #47 - May 9th, 2011, 12:29 pm Post #47 - May 9th, 2011, 12:29 pm
    Marie Davino, 1923-2011, Matriarch of Pompei Bakery

    "Mama Marie," as she was known to patrons and employees alike, could be found at the Near West Side's Pompei Bakery at 5 o'clock most mornings, making sure things got started right.

    Throughout the day, and up until December, she would bounce all over the restaurant, at 1531 W. Taylor St., greeting diners as they came in, chatting with those gobbling down her namesake meatballs or back in the kitchen stirring the sauces that she helped create.
    ...
    she was crowned queen of the Catholic Youth Organization Grape Festival
    ...
    While Mrs. Davino's husband ran Jut's, the tavern next to the bakery, she worked in the telegraph department at the Union Pacific Railroad. After the tavern closed, her husband, who passed away in 1988, became a driver for the Chicago Park District.
    ...
    And in the restaurant, Mrs. Davino wasn't afraid to tell dawdling customers to make room for diners who needed to eat, said Frances Bartilotta, 88, a longtime friend.

    "She'd tell it the way it is," Bartilotta said.
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #48 - May 16th, 2011, 7:44 pm
    Post #48 - May 16th, 2011, 7:44 pm Post #48 - May 16th, 2011, 7:44 pm
    Murray Handwerker, who transformed his father’s Brooklyn hot dog business, Nathan’s Famous, into a celebrated national fast-food chain, died Saturday at his home in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He was 89. http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/16/nyreg ... ref=dining
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #49 - May 19th, 2011, 8:29 am
    Post #49 - May 19th, 2011, 8:29 am Post #49 - May 19th, 2011, 8:29 am
    Hans Morsbach, 1932-2011, Longtime owner of Medici restaurant, author of 'Common Sense Forestry'
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #50 - May 19th, 2011, 9:20 am
    Post #50 - May 19th, 2011, 9:20 am Post #50 - May 19th, 2011, 9:20 am
    Willard S. Boyle dies at 86; a father of the digital camera. Willard S. Boyle shared the 2009 Nobel Prize in physics for the invention at Bell Labs of the imaging device that is at the heart of digital cameras. He also helped develop widely used lasers and earned more than a dozen patents.

    The digital imaging device, called the charge-coupled device, or CCD, allowed engineers for the first time to store a visual image in digital form, revolutionizing photography and a host of other fields. CCDs are at the heart of smartphones, camcorders, telescopes, supermarket bar-code scanners, fax machines and scanners, among other electronic devices.

    Fairchild Semiconductor Corporation "Digital photography has become an irreplaceable tool in many fields of research," the Nobel committee said in its prize announcement. "The CCD has provided new possibilities to visualize the previously unseen. It has given us crystal clear images of distant places in our universe as well as the depths of the oceans…. These inventions may have had a greater impact on humanity than any others in the last half-century."

    All of that from a simple brainstorming session whose goal was actually something entirely different.

    In the fall of 1969, Boyle and his co-laureate, George E. Smith, both of them at Bell Laboratories, gathered in Boyle's office after lunch to think about ways to develop a new memory device for computers. Within an hour, they had come up with the rudiments of the CCD.

    They took advantage of the photoelectric effect, which won Albert Einstein the physics Nobel in 1921. In short, when light strikes a small piece of silicon, it knocks electrons out of their orbits. If the silicon has been formed into small photocells, or pixels, each cell acts as a well that captures and holds the electrons for an extended period.

    Boyle and Smith's key breakthrough was devising a way to read out the number and location of electrons captured in each well in an array of pixels. In a 10-by-10 array, for example, the data are converted into a chain of electron concentrations 100 pixels long. This can be converted back into visual information.

    Within a year, they had given up on their memory device and produced a digital camera. Two years later, Fairchild Semiconductor of San Jose produced the first digital camera with a small (by modern standards) 100-pixel-by-100-pixel photo sensor (10,000 pixels total). The camera went into production a few years later. By 1975, Boyle and Smith had also produced a working video camera suitable for television.
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #51 - June 6th, 2011, 1:09 pm
    Post #51 - June 6th, 2011, 1:09 pm Post #51 - June 6th, 2011, 1:09 pm
    Fredric Baur, inventor of Pringles, has his ashes in a Pringle's can.

    How satisfying it must be to him.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #52 - June 6th, 2011, 9:48 pm
    Post #52 - June 6th, 2011, 9:48 pm Post #52 - June 6th, 2011, 9:48 pm
    How satisfying it must be to him.


    This is funny, but I think it would have been just that for him. :D
  • Post #53 - June 15th, 2011, 6:35 pm
    Post #53 - June 15th, 2011, 6:35 pm Post #53 - June 15th, 2011, 6:35 pm
    Scott B. Crane - Food connoisseur co-founded In Chef's Hands charity for sick and disabled. http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/loca ... 1396.story
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #54 - June 27th, 2011, 8:01 pm
    Post #54 - June 27th, 2011, 8:01 pm Post #54 - June 27th, 2011, 8:01 pm
    Norma (Duffy) Lyon, the ‘Butter-Cow Lady,’ Dies at 81 - http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/28/us/28 ... obituaries
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #55 - June 28th, 2011, 4:46 pm
    Post #55 - June 28th, 2011, 4:46 pm Post #55 - June 28th, 2011, 4:46 pm
    And going forth, I wept butterly. (With apologies to the Gospel of Luke, James Joyce, and the estimable Ms. Lyon.)
  • Post #56 - July 1st, 2011, 9:45 am
    Post #56 - July 1st, 2011, 9:45 am Post #56 - July 1st, 2011, 9:45 am
    Joseph F. Kafka, 1972-2011; Co-owner of Kafka Wine Co. made wines 'accessible and fun'
  • Post #57 - July 2nd, 2011, 8:01 pm
    Post #57 - July 2nd, 2011, 8:01 pm Post #57 - July 2nd, 2011, 8:01 pm
    An obituary of sorts about Pete's Famous Hot Dogs in Birmingham, AL. And the actual obituary of the driving force being the place.
  • Post #58 - July 6th, 2011, 5:48 pm
    Post #58 - July 6th, 2011, 5:48 pm Post #58 - July 6th, 2011, 5:48 pm
    An obituary of George Lang, of Cafe des Artistes in NYC, and author of The Cuisine of Hungary. This guy had an amazing life...
    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/07/nyreg ... ml?_r=1&hp
  • Post #59 - July 20th, 2011, 4:45 pm
    Post #59 - July 20th, 2011, 4:45 pm Post #59 - July 20th, 2011, 4:45 pm
    John Mosca, a Restaurant’s Patriarch, Dies at 86 - http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/20/us/20 ... ref=dining
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #60 - July 20th, 2011, 8:45 pm
    Post #60 - July 20th, 2011, 8:45 pm Post #60 - July 20th, 2011, 8:45 pm
    Edward A. Radek Sr., 1920-2011

    When McDonald's was looking to make changed to the sliding windows used in its drive-thru service in the 1970's, founder Ray Kroc turned to a manufacturing company run by two brothers.

    "We kept tweaking the designs until they were just right," said Mr. Radek's son, ... "We knew how important this deal was."

    Mr. Radek and his brother developed three designs to work with various styles of McDonald's franchises. Though some of their designs were replaced as technology evolved, the basic components of their work are still in place."

    It was also noted Mr. Radek was one of 12 children raised in a bungalow. His son recalls his Dad recollecting he had to fight for his meals.

    Mr. Radek served two years in the 6th Armored Division in General George Patton's Third Army during WWII.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast

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