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Interesting obituaries

Interesting obituaries
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  • Post #61 - July 20th, 2011, 8:55 pm
    Post #61 - July 20th, 2011, 8:55 pm Post #61 - July 20th, 2011, 8:55 pm
    Sam Perricone dies at 91; giant of citrus industry

    By the time he was 16 in 1936, Sam Perricone was picking and packing lemons in Corona and Riverside and then hauling them to Los Angeles in his small pickup truck to sell at the Grand Central Market.
    ...
    My dad also was the first person to package oranges in plastic bags for retail consumption," said Perricone's son Joe, recalling family excursions to his father's groves in Redlands to pick and bag oranges to be sold in retail stores in the late 1950s.

    "He'd have us all go down there; there might be two or three carloads of us on a Sunday," he said.

    He said his father joined in picking, too — as did his grandmother and aunts.
    ...
    When Perricone began selling lemons at the Grand Central Market in the 1930s, son Joe said, "most of the people with the stands were Japanese."

    When Japanese Americans were put in internment camps during World War II, he said, "my dad and my uncle Tony took over two of the stands and managed them until the war was over and gave them back to the original owners. That's the kind of person he was."
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #62 - July 20th, 2011, 9:03 pm
    Post #62 - July 20th, 2011, 9:03 pm Post #62 - July 20th, 2011, 9:03 pm
    Alan Haberman, Who Ushered In the Bar Code, Dies at 81

    On a summer morning in 1974, a man in Ohio bought a package of chewing gum and the whole world changed.

    At 8:01 a.m. on June 26 of that year, a 10-pack of Wrigley’s Juicy Fruit gum slid down a conveyor belt and past an optical scanner. The scanner beeped, and the cash register understood, faithfully ringing up 67 cents.

    That purchase, at a Marsh Supermarket in Troy, Ohio, was the first anywhere to be rung up using a bar code.

    Today, trillions of beeps later, what was once a novel technology with uncertain prospects is so widespread as to be almost invisible. It informs nearly every aspect of modern life, providing a means for people to buy and sell things, couriers to track packages and airlines to locate (in principle, anyway) lost luggage.

    This transformation, industry experts say, is largely because of the work of one person, a supermarket executive from Massachusetts named Alan L. Haberman, who died on Sunday at 81.

    Mr. Haberman did not invent the universal product code, or U.P.C., as the most prevalent type of bar code is formally known. But it is to him that its sheer black-and-white ubiquity and familiar graphic form are primarily owed.
    ...
    By all accounts, he spent years afterward cajoling manufacturers, retailers and the public to accept the strange new symbol, which resembles a highly if irregularly compacted zebra. His efforts helped cement the marriage between the age-old practice of commerce and the new world of information technology.
    ...
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #63 - July 29th, 2011, 3:25 pm
    Post #63 - July 29th, 2011, 3:25 pm Post #63 - July 29th, 2011, 3:25 pm
    Pastry legend Lutz Olkiewicz passes away. Long before gaudy, gooey cupcakes became America’s default dessert, there was Lutz Olkiewicz. http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/ ... 2464.story
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #64 - August 24th, 2011, 3:09 pm
    Post #64 - August 24th, 2011, 3:09 pm Post #64 - August 24th, 2011, 3:09 pm
    John Allan 'Jack' Stewart: 1924–2011, Agronomist worked with farmers and Nobel laureates to feed world

    John Allan "Jack" Stewart's agronomy work took him from the cranberry bogs of Maine to rice paddies in Asia, from famine stricken areas of South America to drought-ravaged Africa.

    "He went everywhere he could to help improve the conditions of the land," said his daughter, Nancy Penne. "He'd be out in a field with a farmer one day and the next day attending a global conference of experts in the field of agriculture."

    During the 1960s, Mr. Stewart worked with Norman Borlaug, the plant scientist who won the 1970 Nobel Peace Prize for his work breeding high-yielding crop varieties that helped to avert mass famines and dramatically increase food production in Latin America and Asia.

    "They were part of an international project to develop fertilizers to help grow rice," said his wife of 62 years, Velma.
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #65 - September 17th, 2011, 7:36 pm
    Post #65 - September 17th, 2011, 7:36 pm Post #65 - September 17th, 2011, 7:36 pm
    Looking up a recipe for tomato soup, I learned Marcia Adams had died.

    February 6, 2011 11:50 a.m., Local author of cookbooks Adams dies

    Nationally known cookbook author Marcia Adams died early Saturday after being hospitalized since Thursday. She was 75.

    Adams was famous for her prize-winning cookbooks that featured Amish and Midwestern recipes and her popular PBS cooking show that aired on stations around the country.

    She also wrote two books and produced a PBS documentary about her successful 2001 heart transplant performed at Lutheran Hospital.

    I contacted Marcia Adams directly sometime in the mid-1990's. I was hoping she might speak in Chicago. She begged off due to heart issues. I did mix into the conversation her processing recommendations for the tomato soup recipe in Cooking in Quilt Country. I suggested the recipe's suggested water bath processing method was incorrect. I suggested it should be pressure canned. She agreed, though her publisher felt few had pressure canners and insisted on water bath processing.

    Her books reflect an appreciation for the Midwest and farm to table food culture that was quaint in the 1980's. Timing is everything and she was ahead of her time.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #66 - September 26th, 2011, 3:57 pm
    Post #66 - September 26th, 2011, 3:57 pm Post #66 - September 26th, 2011, 3:57 pm
    Doritos Inventor Dies at 97, Will Be Buried With His Beloved Chips - http://www.adweek.com/adfreak/doritos-i ... ips-135249
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #67 - September 27th, 2011, 8:48 am
    Post #67 - September 27th, 2011, 8:48 am Post #67 - September 27th, 2011, 8:48 am
    Dave148 wrote:Doritos Inventor Dies at 97, Will Be Buried With His Beloved Chips - http://www.adweek.com/adfreak/doritos-i ... ips-135249

    Not just buried, they will be sprinkled on his grave!

    It is not quite as poetic as the Pringles inventor whose cremated remains were fitted in a Pringles cannister.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #68 - September 27th, 2011, 10:55 am
    Post #68 - September 27th, 2011, 10:55 am Post #68 - September 27th, 2011, 10:55 am
    Cathy2 wrote:
    Dave148 wrote:Doritos Inventor Dies at 97, Will Be Buried With His Beloved Chips - http://www.adweek.com/adfreak/doritos-i ... ips-135249

    Not just buried, they will be sprinkled on his grave!

    Lucky squirrels.
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #69 - September 28th, 2011, 8:29 am
    Post #69 - September 28th, 2011, 8:29 am Post #69 - September 28th, 2011, 8:29 am
    Ines De Costa, the woman who taught celebrity chef Emeril Lagasse how to cook

    ...
    When Lagasse was a boy of about 9 or 10, he used to sit and watch De Costa in the kitchen of a restaurant she owned at the time in nearby Swansea when he visited with his family, Bates said.

    Lagasse included many of De Costa's recipes in his cookbooks, although she was never afraid to scold him for fiddling with her ingredients.

    "He put a recipe for her St. John's kale soup in one book, but she said he put in too much salt, and called to yell at him,"
    ...
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #70 - September 29th, 2011, 1:27 pm
    Post #70 - September 29th, 2011, 1:27 pm Post #70 - September 29th, 2011, 1:27 pm
    Dave148 wrote:
    Cathy2 wrote:
    Dave148 wrote:Doritos Inventor Dies at 97, Will Be Buried With His Beloved Chips - http://www.adweek.com/adfreak/doritos-i ... ips-135249

    Not just buried, they will be sprinkled on his grave!

    Lucky squirrels.

    I think they were sprinkled on his coffin, actually.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #71 - November 3rd, 2011, 2:46 pm
    Post #71 - November 3rd, 2011, 2:46 pm Post #71 - November 3rd, 2011, 2:46 pm
    Former Morton's of Chicago CEO dies at 65. Bernstein also founded Le Peep in the 1980s. http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ ... wrap-11311
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #72 - November 29th, 2011, 12:14 am
    Post #72 - November 29th, 2011, 12:14 am Post #72 - November 29th, 2011, 12:14 am
    Frozen food icon Jeno Paulucci dead at 93

    In 1940 at the age of 22 Paulucci created his first thriving commercial enterprise, growing bean sprouts in northern Minnesota. By 1944 that operation had morphed into the Chun King company. Canned chow mein was the first of many products that Paulucci brought to grocery store shelves and American kitchens.

    "Here was an Italian Immigrant from Northern Minnesota putting together Chinese food in cans, at least what Americans thought was Chinese food," said Hy Berman, professor emeritus in history at the University of Minnesota.

    "And he sold it! I mean, it doesn't make sense! It makes absolutely no sense, but he was very persuasive."

    He also founded Jeno's pizza rolls in the late 1960's.

    I recall my Dad reading a book either by Jeno Paulucci or Chun King was featured as a business model. I remember there was an issue on the benefits of being politically well connected, especially when a company runs into a regulatory issue. I have occasionally thought about looking up this book to read it for myself. Interesting what information the brain traps and revisits from time to time.

    This is the Jessie White commercial mentioned in this obituary:



    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #73 - November 30th, 2011, 1:14 pm
    Post #73 - November 30th, 2011, 1:14 pm Post #73 - November 30th, 2011, 1:14 pm
    Must let my brothers know of Jeno's passing. They should have bought stock in his company during their pizza-roll fueled adolescences. Seriously, they ate them EVERY DAY!
    Man : I can't understand how a poet like you can eat that stuff.
    T. S. Eliot: Ah, but you're not a poet.
  • Post #74 - November 30th, 2011, 2:03 pm
    Post #74 - November 30th, 2011, 2:03 pm Post #74 - November 30th, 2011, 2:03 pm
    Irvin Moehling, 1919-2011: Last farmer in Des Plaines

    Irvin Moehling's great-grandfather was one of the first farmers in Des Plaines, and Mr. Moehling was recognized as its last.

    "Irv was our city's last connection to a Des Plaines family with strong agrarian roots," said Dan Wilson, the alderman for Des Plaines'
    ...
    "He was born in this house and he died in this house," said his wife of 17 years, Beverly. "His father was also born in this house and died in this house. His great-grandparents bought this house in 1865."

    Mr. Moehling, who put farming on hold for nearly four decades while he worked as a mechanical engineer and leased his property to tenant farmers, returned in the early 1990s to tend to the land that his ancestors had settled at the end of the Civil War.
    ...
    By the late 1990s, Mr. Moehling had sold off all but 2½ acres of his family's once-sprawling farm, keeping the original farmhouse, a barn, and smoke and milk house.

    His farm was at the corner of Wolf and Rand roads.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #75 - November 30th, 2011, 2:28 pm
    Post #75 - November 30th, 2011, 2:28 pm Post #75 - November 30th, 2011, 2:28 pm
    Josephine wrote:Must let my brothers know of Jeno's passing. They should have bought stock in his company during their pizza-roll fueled adolescences. Seriously, they ate them EVERY DAY!
    Pizza rolls were mine and my sister's Saturday night treat when my parents left us home with the sitter.
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #76 - November 30th, 2011, 5:46 pm
    Post #76 - November 30th, 2011, 5:46 pm Post #76 - November 30th, 2011, 5:46 pm
    Hi- I never personally met Jeno, but my brother's FIL at the time, when my brother got married in the 1960's, happened to be a friend of Jeno Paulucci. Jeno got invited to the wedding, but as far as I know he did not attend it. He did send a wedding gift though. He gave them a whole case of Wilderness pie making kits. He owned the company at the time. I think it was for cheese cake. You had to supply the cream cheese, and the kit supplied the fruit, and the ingredients for the graham cracker pie crust. At that time I think he owned Chun King too. Unfortunately the marriage only lasted for 10 years, but I still remember eating the cheesecake. As far as I know Wilderness was bought out by another company years ago, and all they make is pie filling now. Thanks, Nancy
  • Post #77 - December 16th, 2011, 2:12 pm
    Post #77 - December 16th, 2011, 2:12 pm Post #77 - December 16th, 2011, 2:12 pm
    Robert Lawrence Balzer, Wine Writer, Dies at 99 - http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/15/dinin ... ref=dining
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #78 - December 21st, 2011, 4:25 pm
    Post #78 - December 21st, 2011, 4:25 pm Post #78 - December 21st, 2011, 4:25 pm
    William Kerr, a glass company executive and Westmont College trustee, dies at 95

    ...
    Kerr had served as president, chairman and chief executive of Kerr Glass Manufacturing Corp., the company famous for its mason jars for home canning, from 1967 until the early 1980s. His father, Alexander H. Kerr, founded the company in Portland, Ore., in 1903 and moved it to Los Angeles in 1920. The elder Kerr died in 1925, and Kerr's mother, Ruth Kerr, ran the business until her death in 1967.

    Bill Kerr was known in the glass container business for developing the twist-off bottle cap and then taking the unusual step of sharing the innovation with other glass bottle manufacturers. He had concluded that glass manufacturers as a whole could then better compete with aluminum can makers, who had gained an edge with the pop-top opening.
    ...

    Note: Kerry died in 2010, I just happened to come across this today.
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #79 - January 17th, 2012, 3:09 pm
    Post #79 - January 17th, 2012, 3:09 pm Post #79 - January 17th, 2012, 3:09 pm
    Dan Evins, founder of Cracker Barrel highway empire, dies - http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obi ... story.html
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #80 - January 25th, 2012, 11:41 am
    Post #80 - January 25th, 2012, 11:41 am Post #80 - January 25th, 2012, 11:41 am
    Robert 'Tubby' Bacon, 1930-2012, Businessman shared love and knowledge of wine with friends near and far

    Mr. Bacon toyed with the idea of studying culinary arts at Le Cordon Bleu but instead took a position as head of the company founded by his father, Bacon's Clipping Bureau, a press clipping service.
    ...

    In the 1960s, cocktails were still the drink of choice for sophisticated Americans, but wine was starting to make inroads.

    "People knew that if they were ever going to have dinner with Jackie Kennedy, they better know what color wine to drink," Rice said.

    Taking to his hobby with great zeal, Mr. Bacon went on to hold leadership roles in the Commanderie de Bordeaux and the Society of Bacchus. In 1990, he was named Chevalier du Merite d'Agricole by the French government for his knowledge and dedication to the appreciation of French wine
    ...
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #81 - February 7th, 2012, 11:01 am
    Post #81 - February 7th, 2012, 11:01 am Post #81 - February 7th, 2012, 11:01 am
    Ferrara Pan Candy Chairman Nello Ferrara has died - http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/ ... a-has-died
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #82 - March 1st, 2012, 10:42 am
    Post #82 - March 1st, 2012, 10:42 am Post #82 - March 1st, 2012, 10:42 am
    West Bend Daily News wrote:The designer of popular home appliances, including the Stir Crazy Popcorn Popper, has died.

    Richard “Dick” Smith, 82, died Monday while walking his dog near his West Bend home.

    Smith, who lived in West Bend since 1956, retired as manager of manufacturing at the West Bend Co., after a career there as a design engineer.

    Among the products Smith developed for West Bend were the Stir Crazy Popcorn Popper and the Water-Wheel Humidifier, both considered revolutionary designs.

    “He was proud of having figured out how to save costs on manufacturing by using standard parts, such as the coffee-can lid in the popcorn popper,” said his eldest son, Richard H.E. Smith II of Palatine, Ill....


    He was my father-in-law.
  • Post #83 - March 1st, 2012, 10:55 am
    Post #83 - March 1st, 2012, 10:55 am Post #83 - March 1st, 2012, 10:55 am
    HI,

    We happen to have the Stir Crazy Popcorn Popper, in fact we have had several of them. My Dad likes how the corn is rotated in the oil for even heating.

    I only spoke to your father-in-law once, when I was looking for someone to teach me how to drive a Ford Model-T. You can see where your husband inherited his voice and enthusiasm. I very much appreciated his willingness to help.

    My condolences to you, your husband and family.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #84 - March 1st, 2012, 10:57 am
    Post #84 - March 1st, 2012, 10:57 am Post #84 - March 1st, 2012, 10:57 am
    Sorry to hear that LAZ.
    I remember the Stir Crazy fondly.

    Sorry for your loss.
  • Post #85 - March 3rd, 2012, 2:58 pm
    Post #85 - March 3rd, 2012, 2:58 pm Post #85 - March 3rd, 2012, 2:58 pm
    Sorry to hear of your father-in-law's passing, Leah. From now on I will think of him as Mister Stir Crazy and thank him for his inventiveness and creativity whenever we enjoy Stir Crazy popcorn at home.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #86 - March 24th, 2012, 4:50 am
    Post #86 - March 24th, 2012, 4:50 am Post #86 - March 24th, 2012, 4:50 am
    Murray Lender, Who Gave All America a Taste of Bagels, Dies at 81 - http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/23/busin ... obituaries
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #87 - March 25th, 2012, 3:02 pm
    Post #87 - March 25th, 2012, 3:02 pm Post #87 - March 25th, 2012, 3:02 pm
    Chaleo Yoovidhya, Thai billionaire who created Red Bull dies

    Born in central Thailand's Pichit province to a Chinese father and a Thai mother who reportedly sold fruit and ducks to survive, Chaleo died the third richest man in Thailand.

    Chaleo started a small company, T.C. Pharmaceuticals, in the 1960s and formulated an energy drink prototype a decade later called Krathing Daeng, or Red Bull in English.

    The drink became popular among truck drivers and other blue-collar workers throughout the country, but it remained a local phenomenon until Chaleo met Austrian entrepreneur Dietrich Mateschitz.

    Together, the pair modified Chaleo's initial formula and founded the international Red Bull brand.
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #88 - March 25th, 2012, 3:15 pm
    Post #88 - March 25th, 2012, 3:15 pm Post #88 - March 25th, 2012, 3:15 pm
    Victoria Kalinowski, Harvey grocer was famous for her garlic-and-butter studded Polish sausages

    Viki” Kalinowski was only 22 when she bought a store in Harvey with $1,800, some of it from poker winnings sent home by her husband, Gene, an infantryman in the Pacific Theater in World War II.

    ...

    Her dream was for her husband to be his own boss. “She didn’t want him to work in a factory after the war,” her daughter said.

    The shop at 157th and Lathrop grew from a little mom-and-pop operation into a one-stop grocery where just about everybody in the neighborhood dropped in just about every day.

    Factory workers from Whiting Corp. stopped in at lunch for Mrs. Kalinowski’s homemade chili, soup and Sloppy Joes. The store sold 300 “he-man” sandwiches a day, stacked with ham and beef on onion rolls and rye. On Fridays, the men could cash their paychecks and pick up a six-pack. At Valentine’s Day, they could find boxes of candy for their wives. In December, they could go to Kalinowski’s to buy a real Christmas tree.

    But the meaty foundation of the business was Kalinowski’s pork-and-beef sausage, based on a recipe Gene obtained from his Polish-born mother, Kazmira. Viki made the kielbasa.

    At its Polish sausage peak, Viki’s Certified Foods and Kalinowski Sausage Co. sold about eight tons a week — fresh and hickory-smoked. During the holidays, demand jumped to 20,000 pounds

    Has anybody had Kalinowski sausage?

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #89 - March 25th, 2012, 6:58 pm
    Post #89 - March 25th, 2012, 6:58 pm Post #89 - March 25th, 2012, 6:58 pm
    Samuel Glazer Dies at 89; Popularized Drip Coffee - http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/22/busin ... obituaries
    Hors D'oeuvre: A ham sandwich cut into forty pieces.
    - Jack Benny
  • Post #90 - April 10th, 2012, 6:28 pm
    Post #90 - April 10th, 2012, 6:28 pm Post #90 - April 10th, 2012, 6:28 pm
    Byron Kouris, Owned Zephyr, Byron’s Hot Dogs

    In the mid-1960s, Mr. Kouris ventured into the restaurant business and opened a series of fast-food sandwich shops called the Lunch Pail that dotted the bus route on Wilson.

    He closed the shops after about 10 years to focus on Zephyr, as well as his up-and-coming hot dog stand.

    “He was very particular” while developing his restaurants, Green said. “He wanted to get everything just right.”

    Byron’s Hot Dogs opened in 1975 on Irving Park Road near Wrigley Field, and soon after, business boomed. At one point there were five stores; two remain open.
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast

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