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Passover Coke and Diet Coke

Passover Coke and Diet Coke
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  • Passover Coke and Diet Coke

    Post #1 - March 23rd, 2007, 4:41 pm
    Post #1 - March 23rd, 2007, 4:41 pm Post #1 - March 23rd, 2007, 4:41 pm
    Treasure Island on Wells has it...$2.99 the six-pack
    See, I'm an idea man, Chuck. I got ideas coming at me all day. Hey, I got it! Take LIVE tuna fish and FEED 'em mayonnaise!

    -Michael Keaton's character in Night Shift
  • Post #2 - March 23rd, 2007, 10:28 pm
    Post #2 - March 23rd, 2007, 10:28 pm Post #2 - March 23rd, 2007, 10:28 pm
    Hi,

    I just got home a few minutes ago. I couldn't wait to pour myself some Passover Coke. I have found the foam is richer, thicker and stays frothy longer than Coke from corn syrup. Did anyone else notice this?

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #3 - March 11th, 2008, 1:04 pm
    Post #3 - March 11th, 2008, 1:04 pm Post #3 - March 11th, 2008, 1:04 pm
    Anyone have a good source on the North Side? In Lake View?
  • Post #4 - March 11th, 2008, 1:27 pm
    Post #4 - March 11th, 2008, 1:27 pm Post #4 - March 11th, 2008, 1:27 pm
    Hi,

    I haven't been to the store lately. I usually find Passover Coke at my local Jewel and Dominicks. Passover isn't until April, which may mean it isn't yet available.

    Regards,
  • Post #5 - March 11th, 2008, 9:01 pm
    Post #5 - March 11th, 2008, 9:01 pm Post #5 - March 11th, 2008, 9:01 pm
    My guess is that when the time comes you'll be able to get it at the Jewel on Broadway just north of Cornelia. They have a decent selection of Kosher items.

    Otherwise, the Kosher Jewel on Howard. Last resort might be checking Peapod?
  • Post #6 - March 12th, 2008, 3:46 pm
    Post #6 - March 12th, 2008, 3:46 pm Post #6 - March 12th, 2008, 3:46 pm
    The Dominick's on McCormick in Lincolnwood will have it and the Jewel on Skokie Blvd in Skokie usually has it.
    The clown is down!
  • Post #7 - March 12th, 2008, 3:48 pm
    Post #7 - March 12th, 2008, 3:48 pm Post #7 - March 12th, 2008, 3:48 pm
    Why can't they just make it with sugar all the time? Or offer it as an alternative all the time?

    Oh how I wish there would be a ban on HFCS. It's almost impossible, nay, it IS impossible to get away from.

    I wouldn't mind paying extra for real sugar, would you?

    PS - They don't offer it in decaf, do they?? :wink:
    I can't believe I ate the whole thing!
  • Post #8 - March 12th, 2008, 4:02 pm
    Post #8 - March 12th, 2008, 4:02 pm Post #8 - March 12th, 2008, 4:02 pm
    Break up the sugar lobby and import restrictions on cane and beet sugars and you'll see the price of sugar drop to an extent that sugar will be back in beverages.
  • Post #9 - March 12th, 2008, 4:17 pm
    Post #9 - March 12th, 2008, 4:17 pm Post #9 - March 12th, 2008, 4:17 pm
    Why can't they just make it with sugar all the time? Or offer it as an alternative all the time?

    It may be coming. I read in one of my journals that Pepsi is launching "Pepsi Raw" in the UK, all sugar sweetened with natural flavorings (no HFCS), as a regular product. I couldn't find out what the timing for a US launch is, but its probably worth keeping an eye out for this.
  • Post #10 - March 17th, 2008, 7:27 pm
    Post #10 - March 17th, 2008, 7:27 pm Post #10 - March 17th, 2008, 7:27 pm
    The best selection of kosher-for-Passover beverages is usually at Hungarian Kosher Foods in Skokie.

    Hungarian Kosher Foods
    847/674-8008
    4020 Oakton St.
    Skokie
  • Post #11 - April 2nd, 2008, 12:27 pm
    Post #11 - April 2nd, 2008, 12:27 pm Post #11 - April 2nd, 2008, 12:27 pm
    I just wanted to report that the 2008 batch of KfP Coca-Cola is on the shelves at the Jewel in Highland Park. I picked up a couple of cases yesterday.

    =R=

    Jewel
    1600 Deerfield Rd
    Highland Park, IL 60035
    847 579-0872
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #12 - April 2nd, 2008, 1:57 pm
    Post #12 - April 2nd, 2008, 1:57 pm Post #12 - April 2nd, 2008, 1:57 pm
    Sweet! It's time for my yearly visit to Jewel.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #13 - April 2nd, 2008, 2:20 pm
    Post #13 - April 2nd, 2008, 2:20 pm Post #13 - April 2nd, 2008, 2:20 pm
    Is it that time of year again for the HFCS vs sugar debate?

    HFCS is derived from corn syrup which is 100% glucose, and some of the glucose is turned into fructose to about a 55 fructose/45 glucose ratio for HFCS used in sodas. Sugar is comprised of one molecule of fructose and one molecule of glucose so to the body drinking a beverage with HFCS or sugar makes no difference because they turn into the same thing.

    The truth about HFCS.

    Quote from the above article:

    The stats are unmistakable: Since 1966, the use of HFCS increased from zero (since it didn’t exist) to nearly 64 lbs. per person per year by 1999, declining slightly since then to about 59 lbs. This coincides with the rise in obesity, which skyrocketed since 1970. At the same time consumption of other sugars flattened.

    That should be a slam-dunk — case closed! Of course no one noticed that cheese consumption went from about 9 lbs. per capita to over 31 lbs., and that frozen potatoes (mostly used as french fries) went 19 lbs. to nearly 55 lbs.
    When I grow up, I'm going to Bovine University!
  • Post #14 - April 2nd, 2008, 2:25 pm
    Post #14 - April 2nd, 2008, 2:25 pm Post #14 - April 2nd, 2008, 2:25 pm
    55/45 & 50/50 is not the same thing. I would not accept "fact" coming from foodprocessing.com as it seems they have a large stake in the subject.
    I can't believe I ate the whole thing!
  • Post #15 - April 2nd, 2008, 2:27 pm
    Post #15 - April 2nd, 2008, 2:27 pm Post #15 - April 2nd, 2008, 2:27 pm
    Fujisan wrote:HFCS is derived from corn syrup which is 100% glucose, and some of the glucose is turned into fructose to about a 55 fructose/45 glucose ratio for HFCS used in sodas. Sugar is comprised of one molecule of fructose and one molecule of glucose so to the body drinking a beverage with HFCS or sugar makes no difference because they turn into the same thing.


    That all may be true, but sugar tastes better, and I'm in it for the taste.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #16 - April 2nd, 2008, 2:30 pm
    Post #16 - April 2nd, 2008, 2:30 pm Post #16 - April 2nd, 2008, 2:30 pm
    Fujisan wrote:Is it that time of year again for the HFCS vs sugar debate?

    HFCS is derived from corn syrup which is 100% glucose, and some of the glucose is turned into fructose to about a 55 fructose/45 glucose ratio for HFCS used in sodas. Sugar is comprised of one molecule of fructose and one molecule of glucose so to the body drinking a beverage with HFCS or sugar makes no difference because they turn into the same thing.

    The truth about HFCS.

    Quote from the above article:

    The stats are unmistakable: Since 1966, the use of HFCS increased from zero (since it didn’t exist) to nearly 64 lbs. per person per year by 1999, declining slightly since then to about 59 lbs. This coincides with the rise in obesity, which skyrocketed since 1970. At the same time consumption of other sugars flattened.

    That should be a slam-dunk — case closed! Of course no one noticed that cheese consumption went from about 9 lbs. per capita to over 31 lbs., and that frozen potatoes (mostly used as french fries) went 19 lbs. to nearly 55 lbs.

    I agree with stevez. Taste regular Coke and KfP Coke side by side and let us know what you think.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #17 - April 3rd, 2008, 7:25 am
    Post #17 - April 3rd, 2008, 7:25 am Post #17 - April 3rd, 2008, 7:25 am
    I didn't say they tasted the same, I said the end product in your body is the same.
    When I grow up, I'm going to Bovine University!
  • Post #18 - April 3rd, 2008, 8:26 am
    Post #18 - April 3rd, 2008, 8:26 am Post #18 - April 3rd, 2008, 8:26 am
    Fujisan wrote:I didn't say they tasted the same, I said the end product in your body is the same.

    Well, sure, nutritionally speaking a bagel and a donut are virtually identical, yet eating them provides 2 very distinctive experiences.

    =R=
    By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself. --Kambei Shimada

    Every human interaction is an opportunity for disappointment --RS

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #19 - April 3rd, 2008, 1:49 pm
    Post #19 - April 3rd, 2008, 1:49 pm Post #19 - April 3rd, 2008, 1:49 pm
    I have no objection to HFCS in and of itself. I'm sure that there are some uses for which it makes little or no difference.

    But in beverages, sugar provides a brighter flavor and, especially, a cleaner mouthfeel.

    I don't think there's a noticeable difference in flavor between cane sugar and beet sugar, however.
  • Post #20 - April 8th, 2008, 6:41 pm
    Post #20 - April 8th, 2008, 6:41 pm Post #20 - April 8th, 2008, 6:41 pm
    My girlfriend found some passover Pepsi at Meijer in Highland, IN. Sadly, no Coke.

    I'm diabetic so I've been abstaining from carbs for most of the day to have a glass; it was worth it.
  • Post #21 - April 8th, 2008, 9:11 pm
    Post #21 - April 8th, 2008, 9:11 pm Post #21 - April 8th, 2008, 9:11 pm
    Liz in Norwood Park wrote:Why can't they just make it with sugar all the time?


    They do. All you have to do is to go to a Mexican grocery store and buy the Mexican Coke in bottles. It's made with sugar.

    JeanneBean wrote:The Dominick's on McCormick in Lincolnwood will have it


    That particular Dominick's has the Kosher for Passover Coke, but only in the liter bottle. No cans.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #22 - April 20th, 2008, 1:48 pm
    Post #22 - April 20th, 2008, 1:48 pm Post #22 - April 20th, 2008, 1:48 pm
    LAZ wrote:
    But in beverages, sugar provides a brighter flavor and, especially, a cleaner mouthfeel.


    Thanks to LTH for turning my family onto KfP Coke. We have found the taste to be exactly as LAZ describes. We all prefer it to regular Coke except for my daughter, who likes things to taste as they always have.

    There are KfP 2-liter bottles of Coke at the Jewel on Howard and Kedzie. They aren't advertised as such--they're just in the regular soft drink aisle. You must look for the white bottle cap with the CRC mark.
  • Post #23 - April 20th, 2008, 2:43 pm
    Post #23 - April 20th, 2008, 2:43 pm Post #23 - April 20th, 2008, 2:43 pm
    I haven't had the kosher-for-passover coke, but Mexican coke is readily available in Rogers Park, and I find I like it well enough to eschew Diet (my personal food philosophy being that if I'll take in extra/empty calories when they're worth something to me) "Regular" Coke has a burn and an aftertaste I find unpleasant, as well as a viscosity I don't like in a non-alcoholic drink.
  • Post #24 - April 20th, 2008, 3:08 pm
    Post #24 - April 20th, 2008, 3:08 pm Post #24 - April 20th, 2008, 3:08 pm
    Mhays wrote:I haven't had the kosher-for-passover coke, but Mexican coke is readily available in Rogers Park,


    I'm about to do a side by side comparison. I'll post my findings tomorrow.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #25 - April 21st, 2008, 12:56 pm
    Post #25 - April 21st, 2008, 12:56 pm Post #25 - April 21st, 2008, 12:56 pm
    The main difference I've found between Passover Coke and Mexican Coke is that the latter sometimes has off-flavors that I attribute to not having traveled well -- too long in transit or subjected to high temperatures or something.
  • Post #26 - April 21st, 2008, 6:01 pm
    Post #26 - April 21st, 2008, 6:01 pm Post #26 - April 21st, 2008, 6:01 pm
    Fujisan wrote:Is it that time of year again for the HFCS vs sugar debate?

    HFCS is derived from corn syrup which is 100% glucose, and some of the glucose is turned into fructose to about a 55 fructose/45 glucose ratio for HFCS used in sodas. Sugar is comprised of one molecule of fructose and one molecule of glucose so to the body drinking a beverage with HFCS or sugar makes no difference because they turn into the same thing.

    The truth about HFCS.


    Just noticed this. Isn't the fructose in sucrose the mirror isomer of the fructose in HFCS? That would have a HUGE impact on all sorts of things, including digestion and absorption into the body.
  • Post #27 - April 24th, 2008, 6:05 am
    Post #27 - April 24th, 2008, 6:05 am Post #27 - April 24th, 2008, 6:05 am
    Passover/Mexican Coke Taste Test 2008

    The Contenders
    Image

    On the left, weighing in at 12 oz. and 140 calories; wearing the red and white aluminum suit...Kosher for Passover Coke.

    On the right, also weighing in at a svelte 12 oz. and 150 calories; wearing the fashionable red, white and clear glass bottle is the challenger from south of the border....Mexican Coke. Let's give 'em both a big round of applause!

    The Tale of the Tape
    Image

    This scrappy contender, originally hailing from the Land of Israel boasts sucrose as it's sweetener, eschewing it's normal HFCS for Passover. He doesn't fight very often, but makes an appearance every year at this time to the delight of his fans.

    Image

    This hard working contender from the land of tacos and big thirst pulls no punches, boasting pure sugar as it's sweetener. Normally, Mexican Coke quietly goes about its business in the Hispanic community, hoping to divert attention from itself due to his questionable legal status, but today he's stepping out of the shadows to take on his only rival in this country.

    The Rules of the Contest
    Identical plastic cups were filled and secretly marked by the referee (The Chow Poodle) and then brought into the tasting chamber and placed on a table. The identity of the contenders was kept secret from the taste testing panel (me). The panel of judges (me again) first sniffed the bouquet, noted the amount of carbonation in the glasses, then tasted both cups repeatedly.

    The Results
    The results were interesting. Passover Coke seemed to have more of a bouquet of cloves than Mexican Coke. Passover also seemed to have a bit more carbonation. I wrote this off as being the difference between traveling all the way from Mexico to compete VS. Passover only having to come from the local bottling plant. Mexican Coke seemed a bit sweeter, with Passover being zippier with more carbonation. Not surprisingly, the taste of the drinks was nearly identical, with any perceived differences a matter of splitting hairs.

    The judge declared a draw, with points going to Passover for clean crisp carbonation, but points going to Mexican for a fuller taste and the (preferable to me) glass bottle.

    The lingering question here is, what (if anything) is the difference between listing sucrose as the sweetener and listing sugar as the sweetener? I'm sure someone can shed some light on this (are you listening Ronnie Suburban?)
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #28 - April 24th, 2008, 8:12 am
    Post #28 - April 24th, 2008, 8:12 am Post #28 - April 24th, 2008, 8:12 am
    Interesting comparison, thanks.

    I’ve heard, but can’t confirm, that there is also a difference in the “secret recipe” for Passover…thus the need for a separate Pesach diet version. Could be, but it could also be just the need for a thorough cleaning of the equipment. We will probably never know.
  • Post #29 - April 24th, 2008, 1:23 pm
    Post #29 - April 24th, 2008, 1:23 pm Post #29 - April 24th, 2008, 1:23 pm
    ah wrote:Interesting comparison, thanks.

    I’ve heard, but can’t confirm, that there is also a difference in the “secret recipe” for Passover…thus the need for a separate Pesach diet version. Could be, but it could also be just the need for a thorough cleaning of the equipment. We will probably never know.

    I've done extensive interviews with kosher authorities on this. There are two differences, besides the cleaning of the equipment and making sure that nobody brings their chometz into the plant.

    The sweetener must be from nongrain sources, which could mean either beet or cane sugar. Any artificial sweeteners used must also be certified as kosher for Passover, without, say, cornstarch used as a filler.

    The other difference, which affects diet pop, is that the CO2 must also come from nongrain sources.

    "You may say that it's just a gas," one rabbi said, "but I ask you, would you drink Coca-Cola without that gas?"
  • Post #30 - April 24th, 2008, 4:21 pm
    Post #30 - April 24th, 2008, 4:21 pm Post #30 - April 24th, 2008, 4:21 pm
    The sweetener must be from nongrain sources, which could mean either beet or cane sugar. Any artificial sweeteners used must also be certified as kosher for Passover, without, say, cornstarch used as a filler.
    Makes sense, since seltzer/soda water must be certified for Passover

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