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I Want to Eat an Asian Carp!

I Want to Eat an Asian Carp!
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  • Post #31 - February 8th, 2010, 8:33 am
    Post #31 - February 8th, 2010, 8:33 am Post #31 - February 8th, 2010, 8:33 am
    I know you cant shut down the Mississippi river but my point is that it wasnt a big deal when they hit the Illinois River.They could have put up a barrier at the starved rock dam and contain them in the Peoria pier.
    There are a couple guys commercial fishing them but dont think its worth the money if there is no market for them.
    With this economy,couldnt the under privledged utilize them???????While were at it,what about the Canadian Geese???????
  • Post #32 - February 8th, 2010, 8:40 am
    Post #32 - February 8th, 2010, 8:40 am Post #32 - February 8th, 2010, 8:40 am
    Canada Geese.
  • Post #33 - February 9th, 2010, 11:35 am
    Post #33 - February 9th, 2010, 11:35 am Post #33 - February 9th, 2010, 11:35 am
    I guess the WHite House convened a Asian Carp Summit yesterday.... problem solved. :roll:
  • Post #34 - February 9th, 2010, 3:44 pm
    Post #34 - February 9th, 2010, 3:44 pm Post #34 - February 9th, 2010, 3:44 pm
    jimswside wrote:I guess the WHite House convened a Asian Carp Summit yesterday.... problem solved. :roll:

    Or just screwed up any progress.......
  • Post #35 - February 9th, 2010, 11:42 pm
    Post #35 - February 9th, 2010, 11:42 pm Post #35 - February 9th, 2010, 11:42 pm
    shooter mcgavin wrote:I know you cant shut down the Mississippi river but my point is that it wasnt a big deal when they hit the Illinois River.They could have put up a barrier at the starved rock dam and contain them in the Peoria pier.
    There are a couple guys commercial fishing them but dont think its worth the money if there is no market for them.
    With this economy,couldnt the under privledged utilize them???????While were at it,what about the Canadian Geese???????

    Supreme Lobster is actively giving those Asian Carp to Chef's to play with. They have also worked on how to filet to minimize bones. They are making an effort to create an interest. They wouldn't be doing this if they didn't identify a reliable supplier, which someone made an effort to convince Supreme Lobster.

    In Peoria, there is a fish distributor named Dickson located on the river. Why don't they talk to them?

    You're complaint with Illinois River management should be directed to the state of Illinois. The Great Lakes has Canada, New York, Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois and Wisconsin involved in its management. If the Illinois river had a similar set of interested parties and high level of commercial activity, it might have been offered a higher level of interest.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #36 - February 10th, 2010, 8:25 am
    Post #36 - February 10th, 2010, 8:25 am Post #36 - February 10th, 2010, 8:25 am
    jimswside wrote:I guess the WHite House convened a Asian Carp Summit yesterday.... problem solved. :roll:


    For those who want to read about the latest plans and discussions, see this article.
  • Post #37 - February 10th, 2010, 9:09 pm
    Post #37 - February 10th, 2010, 9:09 pm Post #37 - February 10th, 2010, 9:09 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:
    shooter mcgavin wrote:I know you cant shut down the Mississippi river but my point is that it wasnt a big deal when they hit the Illinois River.They could have put up a barrier at the starved rock dam and contain them in the Peoria pier.
    There are a couple guys commercial fishing them but dont think its worth the money if there is no market for them.
    With this economy,couldnt the under privledged utilize them???????While were at it,what about the Canadian Geese???????

    Supreme Lobster is actively giving those Asian Carp to Chef's to play with. They have also worked on how to filet to minimize bones. They are making an effort to create an interest. They wouldn't be doing this if they didn't identify a reliable supplier, which someone made an effort to convince Supreme Lobster.

    In Peoria, there is a fish distributor named Dickson located on the river. Why don't they talk to them?

    You're complaint with Illinois River management should be directed to the state of Illinois. The Great Lakes has Canada, New York, Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois and Wisconsin involved in its management. If the Illinois river had a similar set of interested parties and high level of commercial activity, it might have been offered a higher level of interest.

    Regards,

    My point is that this problem could have possibly been taken care of when the Asian Carp first showed up in the Illinois River.
    The Illinois River is just as important as Lake Michigan.
    Your turn.........................
  • Post #38 - March 15th, 2010, 3:47 pm
    Post #38 - March 15th, 2010, 3:47 pm Post #38 - March 15th, 2010, 3:47 pm
    I don't think many people understood the value of the Illinois River.The Illinois River at the turn of the 20th century supply 20% of fresh fish to the U.S. market.The University of Illinois puts out a magazine called "Illinois Steward" of which I got this info.
    By the way the Welland Canal and the Straits of Mackinac contributed many of the invasive species to the Great Lakes and no one complained.
  • Post #39 - March 20th, 2010, 4:40 pm
    Post #39 - March 20th, 2010, 4:40 pm Post #39 - March 20th, 2010, 4:40 pm
    HI,

    A lot invasive species simply came from ship ballasts, too.

    There were also thriving oyster beds on the Illinois River, which are long gone or at least that's my impression.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #40 - March 21st, 2010, 1:20 pm
    Post #40 - March 21st, 2010, 1:20 pm Post #40 - March 21st, 2010, 1:20 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:HI,

    A lot invasive species simply came from ship ballasts, too.

    There were also thriving oyster beds on the Illinois River, which are long gone or at least that's my impression.

    Regards,


    They are clam beds,not oysters.
    Spring Valley,St.Bedes flats are a couple and they are still thriving and very large in area.
    So Cathy2,are you pro Asian Carp??????
    Ever been to the Illinois River??????
    Ever have a 30 lb. fish fly at you??????
    Seems you want to debate......
    Your turn.
  • Post #41 - March 27th, 2010, 7:42 pm
    Post #41 - March 27th, 2010, 7:42 pm Post #41 - March 27th, 2010, 7:42 pm
    there was a write up about this on Chef Foss' (Lockwood restaurant) blog, The Pickled Tongue.
    It was very interesting, a little hilarious, and somewhat informative.
    http://thepickledtongue.com/?p=5511

    It really makes me wonder if we'll be seeing Asian Carp as an amuse bouche soon?
    Models Eat too!!!
    www.bellaventresca.com
  • Post #42 - March 28th, 2010, 4:39 pm
    Post #42 - March 28th, 2010, 4:39 pm Post #42 - March 28th, 2010, 4:39 pm
    I'd think twice about eating any sort of carp from local waters, unless you have an appetite for PCBs.

    http://www.idph.state.il.us/envhealth/f ... sories.pdf
  • Post #43 - March 28th, 2010, 6:31 pm
    Post #43 - March 28th, 2010, 6:31 pm Post #43 - March 28th, 2010, 6:31 pm
    Silver and Bighead carp (Asian carp) are different from common carp. The former are filter feeders and survive on phytoplankton and zooplankton. The latter are foragers (aka "bottom feeders"), and as such their toxicity levels are bound to be different.

    http://www.ag.auburn.edu/fish/international/polycul.htm
  • Post #44 - March 28th, 2010, 11:48 pm
    Post #44 - March 28th, 2010, 11:48 pm Post #44 - March 28th, 2010, 11:48 pm
    m'th'su wrote:Silver and Bighead carp (Asian carp) are different from common carp. The former are filter feeders and survive on phytoplankton and zooplankton. The latter are foragers (aka "bottom feeders"), and as such their toxicity levels are bound to be different.
    Perhaps, but PCBs also contaminate phytoplankton, zooplankton and suspended sediments, so fish that ingest them become increasingly toxic. (Moreover, silver carp eat blue-green algae, which can also render them toxic to humans.)

    Results of the Lake Michigan Mass Balance Study

    Airborne Contaminants and the Great Lakes wrote:Many contaminants are very small. They can easily become attached to fine sediment or nutrients, which are then filtered and eaten by zooplankton and invertebrates.

    Contaminated Sediments and the Great Lakes wrote:Contaminants and the food chain

    The Great Lakes food chain's lowest level is occupied by phytoplankton -- microscopic plants that absorb their necessary nutrients from the water. As phytoplankton absorb nitrogen and phosphorus, they also collect contaminants and are eaten by zooplankton, which, in turn, are eaten by progressively larger fish. Phytoplankton probably get most of their contaminants from the dissolved fraction of contaminants in the water column, but some can also be transferred in the suspended fraction.

    Although pollutants may be excreted by a fish, most of the persistent contaminants are stored in the soft, fatty tissue and gradually build up, or bioaccumulate. Persistent contaminant concentrations in older, larger lake fish such as lake trout and salmon may be more than a million times higher per unit weight than concentrations in the surrounding lake water. The process by which a contaminant increases in concentration as it rises in the food chain is called biomagnification.

    PCBs

    Harmful effects of PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) on fish and fish-eating birds have been documented. PCB effects on humans are less well understood. Because of the known impact on wildlife, there is justifiable concern about the effects of PCBs on human health. Scientific and medical researchers suspect that prolonged exposure to small doses of PCBs can contribute to a variety of human health problems, including developmental problems in children, liver damage and cancer. For this reason, health advisories caution against eating large amounts of large Great Lakes fish. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has determined that fish with PCB levels greater than two parts per million (ppm) pose a human health risk. PCBs accumulate in the body fat of humans just as they do in fish, and most are not passed out of the body.
  • Post #45 - March 30th, 2010, 9:53 am
    Post #45 - March 30th, 2010, 9:53 am Post #45 - March 30th, 2010, 9:53 am
    LAZ wrote:I'd think twice about eating any sort of carp from local waters, unless you have an appetite for PCBs.

    http://www.idph.state.il.us/envhealth/f ... sories.pdf

    Look at the crap comming from China!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Ill eat anything grown in Illinois first.
  • Post #46 - March 30th, 2010, 10:17 am
    Post #46 - March 30th, 2010, 10:17 am Post #46 - March 30th, 2010, 10:17 am
    shooter mcgavin wrote:
    LAZ wrote:I'd think twice about eating any sort of carp from local waters, unless you have an appetite for PCBs.

    http://www.idph.state.il.us/envhealth/f ... sories.pdf

    Look at the crap comming from China!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Ill eat anything grown in Illinois first.

    Fortunately for all of us, your argument is a false dichotomy, and there are plenty of options available to us that are not frozen Chinese fish and toxic local carp.
  • Post #47 - March 30th, 2010, 10:19 am
    Post #47 - March 30th, 2010, 10:19 am Post #47 - March 30th, 2010, 10:19 am
    Khaopaat wrote:Fortunately for all of us, your argument is a false dichotomy, and there are plenty of options available to us that are not frozen Chinese fish and toxic local carp.


    Don't you mean "Fortunately for all of us, your argument is a false dichotomy, and there are plenty of options available to us that are not frozen Chinese fish and toxic local carp!!!!!!!"?
  • Post #48 - March 30th, 2010, 10:27 am
    Post #48 - March 30th, 2010, 10:27 am Post #48 - March 30th, 2010, 10:27 am
    Darren72 wrote:
    Khaopaat wrote:Fortunately for all of us, your argument is a false dichotomy, and there are plenty of options available to us that are not frozen Chinese fish and toxic local carp.


    Don't you mean "Fortunately for all of us, your argument is a false dichotomy, and there are plenty of options available to us that are not frozen Chinese fish and toxic local carp!!!!!!!"?

    How could I have forgotten that???????
    Good call!!!!!!!!
    Your turn.
  • Post #49 - March 31st, 2010, 11:22 am
    Post #49 - March 31st, 2010, 11:22 am Post #49 - March 31st, 2010, 11:22 am
    Darren72 wrote:
    Khaopaat wrote:Fortunately for all of us, your argument is a false dichotomy, and there are plenty of options available to us that are not frozen Chinese fish and toxic local carp.


    Don't you mean "Fortunately for all of us, your argument is a false dichotomy, and there are plenty of options available to us that are not frozen Chinese fish and toxic local carp!!!!!!!"?


    Really threw me with "dichotomy".Had to look it up as im sure others here had to.
    There are other options but who can afford them???????
    What are your non-toxic options that a normal income family can afford.
    Your turn......
  • Post #50 - March 31st, 2010, 12:12 pm
    Post #50 - March 31st, 2010, 12:12 pm Post #50 - March 31st, 2010, 12:12 pm
    shooter mcgavin wrote:
    Khaopaat wrote:Fortunately for all of us, your argument is a false dichotomy, and there are plenty of options available to us that are not frozen Chinese fish and toxic local carp.

    Really threw me with "dichotomy".Had to look it up as im sure others here had to.
    There are other options but who can afford them???????
    What are your non-toxic options that a normal income family can afford.
    Your turn......

    Most of the members of this board represent "normal income families", and I'm almost positive that most avoid frozen Chinese fish, and likely none have eaten toxic local carp.

    Here are a few threads that include discussions of good, fresh fish & where to find it:
    It's Copper River Salmon Season
    Costco
    Is Whole Foods really the best place to get fish in Chicago? SPOILER ALERT: The answer is "not necessarily"
    Good Morgan's on Devon

    There are more threads & posts, but you're just as capable of searching & reading as I am. You're also just as capable of going over to Costco and checking out their ample selection of affordable fresh fish as anyone on this board...if you're serious about exploring what fresh fish options Chicago has to offer, you'll do so.

    Frankly though, I don't think you care at all about finding fresh fish, and I have my doubts that you'll even bother to click on the threads I linked above. It appears to me that you're here solely to complain about the presence of Asian carp in the Illinois River and what you believe is a the lack of attention from the public about this issue. Well let me be the first to say: we heard you, and we get it. Consider your point made.

    Finally, it's not necessary to end your posts with "Your turn". You finished typing and clicked 'Submit', which automatically signified that it is my (or anyone else's) "turn".
  • Post #51 - April 1st, 2010, 12:22 am
    Post #51 - April 1st, 2010, 12:22 am Post #51 - April 1st, 2010, 12:22 am
    Khaopaat wrote:
    shooter mcgavin wrote:
    Khaopaat wrote:Fortunately for all of us, your argument is a false dichotomy, and there are plenty of options available to us that are not frozen Chinese fish and toxic local carp.

    Really threw me with "dichotomy".Had to look it up as im sure others here had to.
    There are other options but who can afford them???????
    What are your non-toxic options that a normal income family can afford.
    Your turn......

    Most of the members of this board represent "normal income families", and I'm almost positive that most avoid frozen Chinese fish, and likely none have eaten toxic local carp.

    Here are a few threads that include discussions of good, fresh fish & where to find it:
    It's Copper River Salmon Season
    Costco
    Is Whole Foods really the best place to get fish in Chicago? SPOILER ALERT: The answer is "not necessarily"
    Good Morgan's on Devon

    There are more threads & posts, but you're just as capable of searching & reading as I am. You're also just as capable of going over to Costco and checking out their ample selection of affordable fresh fish as anyone on this board...if you're serious about exploring what fresh fish options Chicago has to offer, you'll do so.

    Frankly though, I don't think you care at all about finding fresh fish, and I have my doubts that you'll even bother to click on the threads I linked above. It appears to me that you're here solely to complain about the presence of Asian carp in the Illinois River and what you believe is a the lack of attention from the public about this issue. Well let me be the first to say: we heard you, and we get it. Consider your point made.

    Finally, it's not necessary to end your posts with "Your turn". You finished typing and clicked 'Submit', which automatically signified that it is my (or anyone else's) "turn".



    First of all,you used "your turn" at the end of one of your posts so before complaining about the mess in my yard,clean yours up.
    Second,i dont know what your definition of "normal income" family is but with Gold Coast as your location its probably different than mine.$19.99 a pound for salmon isnt doable in my house.
    Lastly,read my previous posts.My gripe is that,and ill say it again where was all the uproar 10+ years ago.Chances are you had no clue about the epidemic until reading it on this board.
    I hope someone makes use of them,i really do and they are contained before they spread to the Great Lakes.
    Your,ah forget it.
  • Post #52 - April 1st, 2010, 9:02 am
    Post #52 - April 1st, 2010, 9:02 am Post #52 - April 1st, 2010, 9:02 am
    shooter mcgavin wrote:First of all,you used "your turn" at the end of one of your posts so before complaining about the mess in my yard,clean yours up.
    Yeah, I was mocking you. Sheesh, it's no fun if I have to explain it.

    shooter mcgavin wrote:Second,i dont know what your definition of "normal income" family is but with Gold Coast as your location its probably different than mine.
    You don't know me, you don't know how much I earn, you don't know about my one-bedroom apartment, and you clearly don't know jack about the Gold Coast neighborhood. Also, I clearly stated "most of the members of this board" represent "normal incomes". Most of the members of this board do not live in my tiny living room, or even in my neighborhood. Reading comprehension: you should try it sometime.

    shooter mcgavin wrote:$19.99 a pound for salmon isnt doable in my house.
    Wild-Caught Copper River salmon for $10.99/lb at Costco
    Trident fish sticks (made with 100% Alaskan Pollack), $13ish for 4lb
    $7.99/lb for big scallops on Harlem
    All of the above from the threads I originally linked. All you had to do is read them, and you would've found these posts. And they don't even include stores in Chinatown, on Argyle, and H-Mart, where even cheaper fresh, high-quality seafood is found.

    shooter mcgavin wrote:Lastly,read my previous posts.My gripe is that,and ill say it again where was all the uproar 10+ years ago.Chances are you had no clue about the epidemic until reading it on this board.
    Khaopaat wrote:It appears to me that you're here solely to complain about the presence of Asian carp in the Illinois River and what you believe is a the lack of attention from the public about this issue. Well let me be the first to say: we heard you, and we get it. Consider your point made.
    Also, re. not knowing about any of this before reading it on this board, you're wrong; I've known about this for years, I just didn't care. Now that Chicago might be affected, I vaguely care, somewhat, a little.
  • Post #53 - April 1st, 2010, 9:26 am
    Post #53 - April 1st, 2010, 9:26 am Post #53 - April 1st, 2010, 9:26 am
    it seems like the electric barriers that are set up are doing their job in protecting the great lakes, at least based on the result of the December '09 fish kill.

    An interesting experiment that only cost taxpayers $3 million dollars, killed 90 tons of other fish, and only turned up (1) carp. :D
  • Post #54 - April 2nd, 2010, 8:06 pm
    Post #54 - April 2nd, 2010, 8:06 pm Post #54 - April 2nd, 2010, 8:06 pm
    Asian carp is officially on the menu at Lockwood.
    Not sure how long it'll be around, but the response thus far has been very positive.
    Phillip Foss
    Chef/Owner, EL ideas
    312-226-8144
    info@elideas.com
    website/blog - http://www.elideas.com
    twitter - http://www.twitter.com/phillipfoss
  • Post #55 - April 2nd, 2010, 11:36 pm
    Post #55 - April 2nd, 2010, 11:36 pm Post #55 - April 2nd, 2010, 11:36 pm
    Hi,

    What is your take on the carp's taste? Is it pleasant as-is or do you need sauce to make it palatable?

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #56 - April 3rd, 2010, 2:01 pm
    Post #56 - April 3rd, 2010, 2:01 pm Post #56 - April 3rd, 2010, 2:01 pm
    I would say it is pleasant as any other fresh water fish, and better than many. The only catch from the culinary side is that you will never get a fillet or steak, so unless you're making a stew, you need to be creative with how to arrive at a portion.
    As we've been learning on the fly, there is a theory as to how some chefs found it good while others were detractors. This is because it deteriorates quickly before it is filleted. Therefore, it is best for our supplier (Supreme) to clean the fish when it arrives to them, and then send them to us mostly free of bones. The filleted fish looks like an M and and there are still many bones to weave through.
    Last edited by phillipfoss on April 3rd, 2010, 2:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.
    Phillip Foss
    Chef/Owner, EL ideas
    312-226-8144
    info@elideas.com
    website/blog - http://www.elideas.com
    twitter - http://www.twitter.com/phillipfoss
  • Post #57 - April 3rd, 2010, 2:08 pm
    Post #57 - April 3rd, 2010, 2:08 pm Post #57 - April 3rd, 2010, 2:08 pm
    How are you preparing the carp, if not in a stew or gefilte fish?
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #58 - April 3rd, 2010, 2:20 pm
    Post #58 - April 3rd, 2010, 2:20 pm Post #58 - April 3rd, 2010, 2:20 pm
    id be curious what a carp dish is fetching $$$ wise in a restaurant.

    If is a good price I may have to get me a boat, and go the 1/2 mile down to the river and catch some.
  • Post #59 - April 3rd, 2010, 2:25 pm
    Post #59 - April 3rd, 2010, 2:25 pm Post #59 - April 3rd, 2010, 2:25 pm
    I bet a good cure or brine and a smoke on the carp would be great (just like chubs!). I don't want to let the secret out but breaded and fried as a sandwich with tartar sauce I am sure will do it justice also (oh, darn, now Mc&onalds will get the idea and we will be paying $15.00 a pound because of the shortage). Great job Chef Phillip for taking a chance on your menu also and hope to dine there soon!
  • Post #60 - April 3rd, 2010, 4:11 pm
    Post #60 - April 3rd, 2010, 4:11 pm Post #60 - April 3rd, 2010, 4:11 pm
    $18!!!! for this preparation:
    http://thepickledtongue.com/?p=5751

    Original post on intitial experiment with Asian Carp:
    http://thepickledtongue.com/?p=5511

    Come on in!!!!!!!!
    Phillip Foss
    Chef/Owner, EL ideas
    312-226-8144
    info@elideas.com
    website/blog - http://www.elideas.com
    twitter - http://www.twitter.com/phillipfoss

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