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Baked Beans
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  • Baked Beans

    Post #1 - July 3rd, 2007, 3:27 pm
    Post #1 - July 3rd, 2007, 3:27 pm Post #1 - July 3rd, 2007, 3:27 pm
    Hi,

    What is your favorite baked beans?

    I have been favoring lately those offered by Smoque with the bits of BBQ mixed it. I intend to doctor the baked beans sold in jars with some pulled pork, brown sugar, bacon drippings and sauteed onions. I hope it will come to tasting approximately like Smoques.

    What is your favorite baked beans recipe? Do you start from scratch or doctor commercial beans? According to LAZ's recipe index there is only one baked bean recipe from Chef d’ Spirit. Of course if you think there is an especially good commercially made baked beans, then I am all ears too!

    Happy 4th of July!

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #2 - July 3rd, 2007, 6:10 pm
    Post #2 - July 3rd, 2007, 6:10 pm Post #2 - July 3rd, 2007, 6:10 pm
    Got this recipe from my cousin's mother-in-law years ago and have made it numerous times. I used to bring it to Bar B Ques all the time. I make it without the bacon when I go to my daughter's since she keeps kosher.

    3-5 Cans of Beans (my husband prefers butter beans but I've also used great northern or canelini)
    1 Bottle of Ketchup
    1/2 C Brown Sugar
    1/4 C Yellow Mustard
    Bacon layered over top

    Throw every thing into heavy dutch oven or bean pot and layer bacon on top. Bake for 1 hour.

    I usually taste the sauce to see if it needs more sugar or mustard. Also the recipe is one bottle of ketchup no matter how much beans I use. It reheats well and is great for pot lucks.
    Paulette
  • Post #3 - July 4th, 2007, 1:27 am
    Post #3 - July 4th, 2007, 1:27 am Post #3 - July 4th, 2007, 1:27 am
    My mom's baked beans are legendary in our family, but she doesn't actually use a recipe, so I will do my best.

    She uses:
    1 large jar of Great Northern Beans, poured into a casserole dish
    Over the beans she adds bacon, cut into slices and distributed over the beans.
    On top of this, she pours molasses, and sprinkles brown sugar. The amounts are to individual preference. I just pour and sprinkle until I like the looks of it.

    She bakes the beans at 350 for about 30 minutes or so, but again, it depends on personal preference.
  • Post #4 - July 4th, 2007, 11:31 am
    Post #4 - July 4th, 2007, 11:31 am Post #4 - July 4th, 2007, 11:31 am
    C2,

    My baked bean observation is no matter the recipe baked beans, or most foods for that matter, are enhanced by Chicharrones (crisp fried pork skin).

    I add a goodly portion of roughly crumbled chicharrones to the beans before baking then, about 15-minutes before they are done, top with additional chicharrones. Hot sauce, lots of hot sauce, is a good addition as well.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #5 - July 4th, 2007, 12:19 pm
    Post #5 - July 4th, 2007, 12:19 pm Post #5 - July 4th, 2007, 12:19 pm
    I served Bush's Baked Beans straight from the can to some Milanese guests at a steak cookout a couple of years ago. They loved them and asked for multiple helpings. This taught me again that it's a good idea not to overlook the humble dishes when making a special meal.
    Man : I can't understand how a poet like you can eat that stuff.
    T. S. Eliot: Ah, but you're not a poet.
  • Post #6 - July 4th, 2007, 12:25 pm
    Post #6 - July 4th, 2007, 12:25 pm Post #6 - July 4th, 2007, 12:25 pm
    I always add four ingredients to the Busk's Baked Beans -

    A little "Show-me" BBQ Sauce
    A little Cajun Power Sauce.
    A little homemade maple syrup
    and a little celery for some crunch.
  • Post #7 - July 4th, 2007, 3:41 pm
    Post #7 - July 4th, 2007, 3:41 pm Post #7 - July 4th, 2007, 3:41 pm
    I served this at the winery for years, folks ate it up, literally:

    Drain a can or two of very good beans--I prefer Bush's, sometimes I use the Mexican

    Add a good, spicy BBQ sauce to wet things down

    Add a tablespoon or two of strong molassas

    Tbs or two of dark brown sugar

    Tbs of *really* good garam masala.

    Warm it up for awhile to let things settle in.

    Geo
    Sooo, you like wine and are looking for something good to read? Maybe *this* will do the trick! :)
  • Post #8 - July 4th, 2007, 4:33 pm
    Post #8 - July 4th, 2007, 4:33 pm Post #8 - July 4th, 2007, 4:33 pm
    Cathy2,

    Here's what I use. A little involved, but worth it.

    By the way, it was good to see you last night.
    Our takeout from Maria's was fantastic!

    3 15 oz cans Great Northern Beans, partially drained
    1 cup brown sugar
    1 cup barbeque sauce
    1 tsp ground cumin
    1 med onion, diced
    1 green pepper, diced--seeds and membrane removed
    3-4 cloves garlic, minced
    2 cups chopped brisket or pulled pork
    1 tbsp bacon grease
    3 or 4 strips uncooked bacon
    Start by sauteeing the onion and bell pepper in the bacon fat until the onion is just starting to carmelize. Add the garlic and continue sauteeing just until the garlic starts to turn color. Remove from heat.
    Mix the beans, barbeque sauce, cumin and brown sugar in a mixing bowl. Add the chopped brisket or pork and the sauteed onion & pepper. stir until mixed.
    Taste and adjust flavors as needed by adding more brown sugar if not sweet enough or more barbeque sauce if not spicy enough for your tastes. Cayenne can be added to boost heat. Salt will probably not need to be added as there will be plenty from the beans and sauce. If the mixture looks too dry, add a small amount of water or beer.
    Pour the bean mixture into a disposable aluminum pan. Lay the bacon strips across the top. Place the pan uncovered in your smoker for the last 1-2 hours of cooking. In a horizontal smoker place the pan nearest the hotter end, rotating end for end every hour to heat all sides of the pan equally. In a vertical, place the pan in the hottest portion of the chamber.
    The beans are done when the bacon strips on top are done and it is hot and bubbly around the edges. The 1-2 hour cooking time is an estimate based on how my smoker performs. Yours may vary.
  • Post #9 - July 5th, 2007, 7:25 am
    Post #9 - July 5th, 2007, 7:25 am Post #9 - July 5th, 2007, 7:25 am
    the above is similar to the recipe i do when i'm going to the trouble of making an all-day barbecue.

    i start the beans on the stovetop, rendering 5-6 slices of high-quality bacon cut into 1/2" strips. pull out the crisped bacon, then use the fat to sweat one minced white onion, and a couple cloves of chopped garlic. once these are softened, add 1 1/2 cups of brown sugar and allow it to melt and then caramelize in the bacon fat. once the sugar has bubbled away awhile, i add about 1/4 cup of apple cider vinegar, a good dose of cumin, ancho chile powder, a little hotter chile powder (chipotle, cayenne), and some cinnamon.

    let those spices sautee a bit and then add probably a cup of store-bought barbecue sauce, and a bottle of beer.

    to this, i add 2 cans each of kidney, black, and great northern beans, drained. mix everything up together and put the whole thing, uncovered, into the oven or, ideally, the bottom rack of the smoker. (i really only make this recipe when i'm using the smoker).

    let it go an hour or two on the smoker. then taste, add salt and pepper, re-season if necessary, and add the crispy bacon right before serving.
  • Post #10 - July 5th, 2007, 7:55 am
    Post #10 - July 5th, 2007, 7:55 am Post #10 - July 5th, 2007, 7:55 am
    Some of the best beans I have had come from Alton Brown. Usually cook them overnight:

    The Once and Future Beans Recipe

    1 pound dried Great Northern beans
    1 pound bacon, chopped
    1 onion, chopped
    2 jalapenos, chopped
    1/4 cup tomato paste
    1/4 cup dark brown sugar
    1/4 cup molasses
    Vegetable broth
    1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
    1 teaspoon black pepper
    2 teaspoons kosher salt

    Heat oven to 250 degrees F.
    Soak beans in a plastic container overnight in just enough cold water to submerge them completely.

    Place a cast iron Dutch oven over medium heat and stir in the bacon, onion, and jalapenos until enough fat has rendered from the bacon to soften the onions, about 5 minutes. Stir in the tomato paste, dark brown sugar, and molasses.

    Drain the beans and reserve the soaking liquid. Add the drained beans to the Dutch oven. Place the soaking liquid in a measuring cup and add enough vegetable broth to equal 4 cups of liquid. Add the liquid to the Dutch oven and bring to a boil over high heat. Add in cayenne, black pepper and salt. Give them a stir and cover with the lid. Place the Dutch oven in the oven for 6 to 8 hours, or until the beans are tender.
  • Post #11 - July 5th, 2007, 9:56 am
    Post #11 - July 5th, 2007, 9:56 am Post #11 - July 5th, 2007, 9:56 am
    I love Jeff Smith's version from the "Frugal Gourmet" cookbook.

    Suzy
    " There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life."
    - Frank Zappa
  • Post #12 - July 5th, 2007, 2:49 pm
    Post #12 - July 5th, 2007, 2:49 pm Post #12 - July 5th, 2007, 2:49 pm
    Lou Don's Baked Beans

    Ingredients:
    1 #10 Can Pork n Beans
    1 1/2 pounds ground beef
    1 green pepper
    1 large yellow onion
    3 bunches green onion
    1 cup chopped celery
    4 tablespoons molasses
    3/4 cup brown sugar
    1/4 cup white sugar
    1 cup BBQ sauce
    1/4 cup ketchup
    1/4 cup yellow mustard
    Hot sauce to taste
    6-8 strips bacon

    Sauté chopped green pepper, celery, onions.
    Brown ground beef, rinse, and drain
    Drain most of liquid from bean can
    Mix with beef and sautéed veggies
    Add molasses, brown sugar, sugar, mustard, BBQ sauce, ketchup, hot sauce
    Stir well. Place mixture in baking casserole or steam table pan.
    Cover beans with strips of bacon.
    Bake at 350deg for 1 hour or until top is nicely browned.

    This is the recipe for baked beans is by Lou Don Beavers (a woman, since passed away) from the Tradewater Café in Dawson Springs, Kentucky
  • Post #13 - October 4th, 2007, 9:19 am
    Post #13 - October 4th, 2007, 9:19 am Post #13 - October 4th, 2007, 9:19 am
    I would like to change my vote for Alton Brown's beans that I posted above. Until last night, those were my favorite baked beans, but I think Keri's Hog-Apple Baked Beans just moved ahead.

    I made some minor changes to it, so this is what I made last night (it was a TON of beans, and thank god cause I want more!):

    6 slices bacon, diced
    2 x 55 oz cans Bush's Original Baked Beans
    1 c. Sweet Baby Ray's Hot & Spicy BBQ Sauce
    1 lb pulled pork (chopped)
    1 21oz can apple pie filling (chop up the big chunks some)
    2 medium onion, chopped
    1 green pepper, chopped
    1 c. dark brown sugar
    4 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
    4 Tbsp. Yellow Mustard
    2 tsp Chipotle Powder (or cayenne)
    2 tsp BBQ rub


    In a dutch oven, render bacon and then add onion and green pepper and sautee until soft. Combine rest of ingredients and bake at 325 for 1 hour.
  • Post #14 - July 5th, 2008, 2:03 am
    Post #14 - July 5th, 2008, 2:03 am Post #14 - July 5th, 2008, 2:03 am
    Jamieson22 wrote:Keri's Hog-Apple Baked Beans just moved ahead.

    I made some minor changes to it, so this is what I made last night (it was a TON of beans, and thank god cause I want more!)
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Image
    Keri's hog-apple baked beans by Giovanna

    Ronnie_suburban's great photos from the LTHForum 1,000-Recipe Potluck, June 22, 2008, appear here, including this shot of Keri's hog-apple baked beans, as prepared by Giovanna.
  • Post #15 - July 5th, 2008, 12:14 pm
    Post #15 - July 5th, 2008, 12:14 pm Post #15 - July 5th, 2008, 12:14 pm
    The Hot and Smoky Baked Beans are my current favorite, courtesy of Smittenkitchen.com

    http://smittenkitchen.com/2006/07/beans ... our-heart/
  • Post #16 - July 5th, 2008, 3:55 pm
    Post #16 - July 5th, 2008, 3:55 pm Post #16 - July 5th, 2008, 3:55 pm
    Jamieson22 wrote:I would like to change my vote for Alton Brown's beans that I posted above. Until last night, those were my favorite baked beans, but I think Keri's Hog-Apple Baked Beans just moved ahead.

    I made some minor changes to it, so this is what I made last night (it was a TON of beans, and thank god cause I want more!):

    6 slices bacon, diced
    2 x 55 oz cans Bush's Original Baked Beans
    1 c. Sweet Baby Ray's Hot & Spicy BBQ Sauce
    1 lb pulled pork (chopped)
    1 21oz can apple pie filling (chop up the big chunks some)
    2 medium onion, chopped
    1 green pepper, chopped
    1 c. dark brown sugar
    4 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
    4 Tbsp. Yellow Mustard
    2 tsp Chipotle Powder (or cayenne)
    2 tsp BBQ rub

    In a dutch oven, render bacon and then add onion and green pepper and sautee until soft. Combine rest of ingredients and bake at 325 for 1 hour.


    Jamieson22,
    I've made this recipe a few times now and got it from the same site you referenced. It's a great recipe but I think the original recipe is too sweet for my taste. Actually, I can't believe that most of the people on that thread where it originated commented on how spicy it was--very strange. Anyway, like you, I upped the cayenne but I also added a few other twists. Now I add a tablespoon of cayenne, 1 tsp. of chipotle powder, 1 tablespoon of black pepper, and I've substituted the bell pepper portion of the recipe to a poblano. The good thing is that it's a great recipe that anyone and everyone can adapt to their tastes.
    "Skin that smoke wagon and see what happens..."
    - Wyatt Earp, Tombstone
  • Post #17 - July 7th, 2008, 8:17 am
    Post #17 - July 7th, 2008, 8:17 am Post #17 - July 7th, 2008, 8:17 am
    the sleeve wrote:Jamieson22,
    I've made this recipe a few times now and got it from the same site you referenced. It's a great recipe but I think the original recipe is too sweet for my taste. Actually, I can't believe that most of the people on that thread where it originated commented on how spicy it was--very strange. Anyway, like you, I upped the cayenne but I also added a few other twists. Now I add a tablespoon of cayenne, 1 tsp. of chipotle powder, 1 tablespoon of black pepper, and I've substituted the bell pepper portion of the recipe to a poblano. The good thing is that it's a great recipe that anyone and everyone can adapt to their tastes.


    Yeah, I have made these 5 or 6 times now and have to say, I really enjoy them. I do agree with the sweetness, so I'd cut the sugar in half at least. I usually add extra chipotle powder and often include some jalapenos with the onions and green pepper.

    I never thought I'd be so willing to use delicious leftover pulled pork in something other than between two pieces of bread. Now I make sure I keep a few pounds on hand at all times for these beans :)

    Jamie
  • Post #18 - May 4th, 2010, 10:06 pm
    Post #18 - May 4th, 2010, 10:06 pm Post #18 - May 4th, 2010, 10:06 pm
    Had to dig a while but I found it,and it's worth buying a bottle just to make these. :wink:


    Jack in the Beans

    Ingredients:

    2 tablespoons bacon drippings or oil (if you use bacon,crumble the bacon and add it,too)

    1 small onion, chopped

    2 tablespoons brown sugar

    1/3 cup Jack Daniel’s® Tennessee Whiskey

    1 can (28 ounces) baked beans

    1 tablespoon spicy brown mustard

    2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

    ½ teaspoon liquid smoke, optional

    1/4 to 1/2 cup ketchup,optional
    Instructions:

    Heat drippings in a large saucepan. Stir in the onion and brown sugar.
    Cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until the onion is soft and golden brown, about 5 minutes. Stir in the remaining ingredients.(I add the Jack first and let the most of the alcohol evaporate) Simmer 20 to 30 minutes. Makes 6 servings.
    It’s more fun to talk with someone who doesn’t use
    long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like
    “What about lunch?”
    —Winnie The Pooh
    "... a good dinner is of great importance to good talk. One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well."
    Virginia Woolf : A Room of One's Own
  • Post #19 - May 4th, 2010, 10:14 pm
    Post #19 - May 4th, 2010, 10:14 pm Post #19 - May 4th, 2010, 10:14 pm
    Hi,

    If you happen to have a smoker, you can set the beans underneath your ribs or pork butt to catch the drippings and infuse naturally with smoke.

    The words "liquid smoke" almost invite ridicule around here, though you are new and innocent to this unwritten almost automatic dislike of this condiment. I have a bottle on my shelf that I may have used once long ago in the caveman days before internet chat sites. I hate throwing things away.

    Welcome to LTHforum! And thanks for the tip earlier on tours of the Vienna Hot Dog plant. I took it recently and thought it was a great use of a morning.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #20 - May 5th, 2010, 12:19 am
    Post #20 - May 5th, 2010, 12:19 am Post #20 - May 5th, 2010, 12:19 am
    Cathy2 wrote:The words "liquid smoke" almost invite ridicule around here, though you are new and innocent to this unwritten almost automatic dislike of this condiment


    I have to admit that even as a noob,when I saw that ingredient I winced and thought "this ain't gonna end well"
    :lol:
  • Post #21 - May 5th, 2010, 6:09 am
    Post #21 - May 5th, 2010, 6:09 am Post #21 - May 5th, 2010, 6:09 am
    :oops: Mea culpa,mea maxima culpa. More reading,less posting shall be my self imposed punishment.Thanks for the kind correction. I think I made them at least once without the offensive ingredient and didn't miss it a bit. :)
    It’s more fun to talk with someone who doesn’t use
    long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like
    “What about lunch?”
    —Winnie The Pooh
    "... a good dinner is of great importance to good talk. One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well."
    Virginia Woolf : A Room of One's Own
  • Post #22 - May 5th, 2010, 10:30 am
    Post #22 - May 5th, 2010, 10:30 am Post #22 - May 5th, 2010, 10:30 am
    that's my favorite wrote::oops: Mea culpa,mea maxima culpa. More reading,less posting shall be my self imposed punishment.Thanks for the kind correction. I think I made them at least once without the offensive ingredient and didn't miss it a bit. :)


    Frankly, while what Cathy2 says is accurate, it's not gospel. That is to say, I suspect a number of us (maybe, possibly, even a surprising number of us) have used and will continue to use liquid smoke on occasion. It serves a purpose and so long as it isn't overdone/overused, I don't think too many folks will have a real problem with this. If it's in your recipe, then it's in your recipe. No mea culpas needed. And by all means, don't refrain from posting. Just because someone might disagree with an ingredient is hardly grounds from censoring yourself.

    And welcome!
    Gypsy Boy

    "I am not a glutton--I am an explorer of food." (Erma Bombeck)
  • Post #23 - May 5th, 2010, 11:53 am
    Post #23 - May 5th, 2010, 11:53 am Post #23 - May 5th, 2010, 11:53 am
    I second that, Gypsy Boy. I've got no problem with judicious use of a Liquid Smoke brand that truly is liquid smoke, with the fewest possible color or flavor additives.
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"
  • Post #24 - May 15th, 2010, 4:55 pm
    Post #24 - May 15th, 2010, 4:55 pm Post #24 - May 15th, 2010, 4:55 pm
    baking beans in an oven, cant really see that, they are better off the smoker, plus you get natural smoke flavor(liquid huh... please):

    this is a recipe I have modified from a version I found on a great bbq site I belong to: aka "Dutch's Beans".

    chooped pineapple, jalapenos, onion, green pepper, sauteed bacon, dry mustard, brown sugar, kilbasa, etc.



    Image
    Last edited by jimswside on May 16th, 2010, 2:55 pm, edited 3 times in total.
  • Post #25 - May 16th, 2010, 9:57 am
    Post #25 - May 16th, 2010, 9:57 am Post #25 - May 16th, 2010, 9:57 am
    these beans were awesome, smokey, sweet, hot, etc. I stirred in the smoked skin so eveyone could get some of that crust.

    Image
    Last edited by jimswside on May 16th, 2010, 1:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #26 - May 16th, 2010, 10:46 am
    Post #26 - May 16th, 2010, 10:46 am Post #26 - May 16th, 2010, 10:46 am
    Gypsy Boy wrote:And by all means, don't refrain from posting. Just because someone might disagree with an ingredient is hardly grounds from censoring yourself.
    I would never suggest anyone refrain from posting a recipe due to an ingredient, but I have a real problem with l*quid sm*ke. Even in minuscule amounts it turns the most delectable dish into ash, cigarette ash to be specific, to my taste.

    For years I thought I did not like smoked foods, turns out it was l*quid sm*ke I didn't enjoy.

    To each their own, but I've 'got a thing' with l*quid sm*ke.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #27 - May 17th, 2010, 9:01 am
    Post #27 - May 17th, 2010, 9:01 am Post #27 - May 17th, 2010, 9:01 am
    So Jim, are you going to tell us how you made your beans? They look yummy!
  • Post #28 - May 17th, 2010, 9:16 am
    Post #28 - May 17th, 2010, 9:16 am Post #28 - May 17th, 2010, 9:16 am
    razbry wrote:So Jim, are you going to tell us how you made your beans? They look yummy!


    my bad, I was in a hurry Saturday & yesterday doing some house painting.

    Dutch's wicked beans recipe with my modifications denoted by a *

    (2) cans Bush's original recipe baked beans
    1 cup ketchup
    1 cup brown sugar(I used light)
    1 tbsp Dry mustard
    1 jalapeno chopped
    1/2 yellow onion chopped
    1/2 green pepper chopped
    * 1 cup chopped fresh pineapple(recipe called for canned)
    5 slices bacon chopped
    * 1 tbsp sweet relish
    * 3/4 lb double smoked kilbasa(had 1 lb. but some disappeared).

    I sauteed off the chopped bacon, and removed it with a slotted spoon when done, then I sauteed the onion, green pepper, and jalapeno in the bacon fat til soft.

    The kilbasa was store bought hillshire farm kilbasa(already smoked, but I smoked it for an hour to "double smoke it" cut the link in half and sliced.

    In a bowl I put the beans, pineaplle, ketchup, dry mustard, sweet relish, brown sugar, cooled veg, colled kilbasa, and cooked bacon & folded the mix together.

    I Put the mix in an oven ssafe cooking vessel, and put it on the bottom rack of my WSM under 3 slabs of babybacks to catch the drippings. Smoked at around 225 degrees for about 3 hours using RO lump, and hickory.
  • Post #29 - May 17th, 2010, 10:54 am
    Post #29 - May 17th, 2010, 10:54 am Post #29 - May 17th, 2010, 10:54 am
    Thanks Jim!
  • Post #30 - May 17th, 2010, 2:37 pm
    Post #30 - May 17th, 2010, 2:37 pm Post #30 - May 17th, 2010, 2:37 pm
    Those baked beans are beautiful. You are an inspiration, Jim! Although I am still disappointed by your stubborn refusal to adopt me. Maybe you need to take on an apprentice instead ...
    "Your swimming suit matches your eyes, you hold your nose before diving, loving you has made me bananas!"

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