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Healthy Eats?
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  • Healthy Eats?

    Post #1 - February 17th, 2008, 5:48 pm
    Post #1 - February 17th, 2008, 5:48 pm Post #1 - February 17th, 2008, 5:48 pm
    I know Chicago is the land of Pizza, Italian beefs, Hot Dogs and Polish sausages. Many of us here have grown up on these staples. But as the years go by and we start getting a little wiser, we would like to at least go out and get a healthy but reasonably priced bite to eat.

    Problem is, Chicago has very little in the way of these types of establishments.

    I know about Pockets, and a few other salad chains that have popped up around the Loop. But where are the neighborhood places? And when I say "neighborhood" I mean areas other than Lincoln park & Bucktown, where so many of these types of places pop up.

    Anyway, I guess with the closing of places such as Zoom Kitchen, which was a mixed bad as far as food went. I don't see any healthy alternative places that have good food without gouging us for it. I mean, some places are charging $10-15 for a salad....A SALAD.....COME ON!!!

    I was on the West Coast and in L.A and San Francisco they have some really good places to get a salad, sandwiches and some sides all reasonably priced and with multiple locations. While not dining "experiences" these places are good for everyday casual eating out and family friendly.

    The two places that stuck out to me are California Chicken Cafe in L.A and Pluto's in San Francisco.

    What do we have? ...Hot Doug's :roll: :lol:

    Any suggestions? They are much appreciated.
  • Post #2 - February 17th, 2008, 6:25 pm
    Post #2 - February 17th, 2008, 6:25 pm Post #2 - February 17th, 2008, 6:25 pm
    Hi Wiseguy.

    If I may be so bold, I think you're looking at it the wrong way. Sure, it would be great to have a tasty, inexpensive restaurant that only served healthy food, but those are few and far between. However, healthy options exist at tons of restaurants, so I have to disagree with your generalization that you can't find easily find healthy, reasonably priced food in Chicago.

    A few examples off the top of my head:
    Japanese: Sushi is healthy, though you want to watch the sodium that sneaks in if you use tons of soy sauce. Chicken teriyaki with rice, also good for you. Miso soup and gomae are also great choices!

    Pizza: A slice or two of thin crust pizza with veggies is darn healthy. Consider asking them to go light on the cheese, and throw on some chicken or ground beef for some protein.

    Mexican: A taco made with a soft corn tortilla, lean protein, lettuce, tomatos, salsa and a light sprinkling of cheese? Balanced and healthy. Rice and beans, assuming they aren't made with much lard, are also fine. Lots of Mexican places make great chicken soup, which isn't bad (assuming there isn't a layer of fat on the top.)

    Thai: Go for the spring rolls (the ones that aren't deep fried), but watch out for the peanut sauce. Tom yum soup is also pretty good. (In fact, most soups with a clear broth are going to be generally healthy.) I often opt for Naem Sod salad (may be known by other names), made with steamed chicken, onions, scallion, peanuts and lime juice, plus a side of white rice. (Ask them to go light on the peanuts.)

    Greek/Middle Eastern: Go for the beef or chicken kabobs. Go light on the yogurt sauce (since it may be made with a higher-fat yogurt), enjoy some of the rice, get a side of grilled veggies and avoid eating too much of the pita bread.

    ...I could keep going, but I hope that I've gotten you thinking out of the box. But before I end this, I have to remind you that "healthy salads" is often a contradiction. Once the restaurant loads it up with cheese, nuts and a fat-filled dressing, your health benefits have gone down the drain, and you would have been better off with a hamburger!
  • Post #3 - February 17th, 2008, 6:36 pm
    Post #3 - February 17th, 2008, 6:36 pm Post #3 - February 17th, 2008, 6:36 pm
    chgoeditor wrote:Hi Wiseguy.

    If I may be so bold, I think you're looking at it the wrong way. Sure, it would be great to have a tasty, inexpensive restaurant that only served healthy food, but those are few and far between. However, healthy options exist at tons of restaurants, so I have to disagree with your generalization that you can't find easily find healthy, reasonably priced food in Chicago.

    A few examples off the top of my head:
    Japanese: Sushi is healthy, though you want to watch the sodium that sneaks in if you use tons of soy sauce. Chicken teriyaki with rice, also good for you. Miso soup and gomae are also great choices!

    Pizza: A slice or two of thin crust pizza with veggies is darn healthy. Consider asking them to go light on the cheese, and throw on some chicken or ground beef for some protein.

    Mexican: A taco made with a soft corn tortilla, lean protein, lettuce, tomatos, salsa and a light sprinkling of cheese? Balanced and healthy. Rice and beans, assuming they aren't made with much lard, are also fine. Lots of Mexican places make great chicken soup, which isn't bad (assuming there isn't a layer of fat on the top.)

    Thai: Go for the spring rolls (the ones that aren't deep fried), but watch out for the peanut sauce. Tom yum soup is also pretty good. (In fact, most soups with a clear broth are going to be generally healthy.) I often opt for Naem Sod salad (may be known by other names), made with steamed chicken, onions, scallion, peanuts and lime juice, plus a side of white rice. (Ask them to go light on the peanuts.)

    Greek/Middle Eastern: Go for the beef or chicken kabobs. Go light on the yogurt sauce (since it may be made with a higher-fat yogurt), enjoy some of the rice, get a side of grilled veggies and avoid eating too much of the pita bread.

    ...I could keep going, but I hope that I've gotten you thinking out of the box. But before I end this, I have to remind you that "healthy salads" is often a contradiction. Once the restaurant loads it up with cheese, nuts and a fat-filled dressing, your health benefits have gone down the drain, and you would have been better off with a hamburger!


    I really appreciate the reply.

    I guess I should have clarified that I'm looking for American food, not ethnic staples that we have all had for years here. And you're right, all of the things you've mentioned have traditional and nutritional value and are good for you. The thing is, when you just want a salad and a rotisserie chicken sandwich for less than $10, where can we go?

    All of the food you mentioned I have been having for years, and frankly, I'm burned out on those choices too. I just used Pizza, hot dogs etc...to make my point. Plus, since I consider myself a decent cook, I can make versions of most of that stuff at home for less money and in some instances, tastier than going out.

    But to me, making salads with tons of different vegetables and making rotisserie chicken and fresh soups can get to be a little more of a chore than making some Thai chicken with cilantro lime rice, or some homemade tacos.

    Where's the simple places?
  • Post #4 - February 17th, 2008, 7:19 pm
    Post #4 - February 17th, 2008, 7:19 pm Post #4 - February 17th, 2008, 7:19 pm
    For the past couple of years, I've been making a habit of trying to eat a healthier diet with a few splurges on something high fat and or high sugar once a week.

    Many days, I make four courses of salads and proteins from the deli at Whole Foods. Edamame salad with carrots, garlic parsley and olive oil is quite tsty and delivers a wallop of soy protein. Sometimes, I'll opt for a salad of yellow curried Israeli couscous with chicken, onions and dried cranberry. Other times, I'll construct a big salad with chick peas, cheese and sesame seeds which I'll eat over the course of a few days.

    When I eat out, I like to look for places where I can find some lean protein and complex carbs in the form of green leafy veggies. I'm a weight lifter, so protein is important to me. Some of the places I visit are vegetarian, some are not. There are two many to go into great detail of each one. But, I have visited all of the following in the past year for healthy eating:

    Green Zebra for fine vegetarian dining
    Chicago Diner (not recommended)
    Soul Vegetarian East on 79th
    Alice and Friends
    New Heartland
    Victory's Banner in Roscoe Village (as much for the show as the food)
    Cousin's Vitality on Irving Park
    Handlebar in Bucktown
    Foodlife in Water Tower
    Lo Cal Corner in the Gold Coast
    Lakeside Cafe in Rogers Park
    Blind Faith Cafe in Evanston
    Boston Market for rotisserie chicken and steamed veggies
  • Post #5 - February 17th, 2008, 7:51 pm
    Post #5 - February 17th, 2008, 7:51 pm Post #5 - February 17th, 2008, 7:51 pm
    YourPalWill wrote:For the past couple of years, I've been making a habit of trying to eat a healthier diet with a few splurges on something high fat and or high sugar once a week.

    Many days, I make four courses of salads and proteins from the deli at Whole Foods. Edamame salad with carrots, garlic parsley and olive oil is quite tsty and delivers a wallop of soy protein. Sometimes, I'll opt for a salad of yellow curried Israeli couscous with chicken, onions and dried cranberry. Other times, I'll construct a big salad with chick peas, cheese and sesame seeds which I'll eat over the course of a few days.

    When I eat out, I like to look for places where I can find some lean protein and complex carbs in the form of green leafy veggies. I'm a weight lifter, so protein is important to me. Some of the places I visit are vegetarian, some are not. There are two many to go into great detail of each one. But, I have visited all of the following in the past year for healthy eating:

    Green Zebra for fine vegetarian dining
    Chicago Diner (not recommended)
    Soul Vegetarian East on 79th
    Alice and Friends
    New Heartland
    Victory's Banner in Roscoe Village (as much for the show as the food)
    Cousin's Vitality on Irving Park
    Handlebar in Bucktown
    Foodlife in Water Tower
    Lo Cal Corner in the Gold Coast
    Lakeside Cafe in Rogers Park
    Blind Faith Cafe in Evanston
    Boston Market for rotisserie chicken and steamed veggies


    Thank you will for your suggestions, Will.

    I have noticed after lurking here for several years that people aren't always interested in eating healthy when they go out. I can understand though since I also like my butter laden meals at many dining establishments. But I think that many people would benefit from eating some of their meals at the places you've mentioned.

    I guess Chicago isn't as health conscious as others cities, but I hope we can be in the future.
  • Post #6 - February 17th, 2008, 8:36 pm
    Post #6 - February 17th, 2008, 8:36 pm Post #6 - February 17th, 2008, 8:36 pm
    YourPalWill wrote:I have visited all of the following in the past year for healthy eating:

    Soul Vegetarian East on 79th


    Calling the food at Soul Vegetarian East "healthy" might be a stretch. :D
  • Post #7 - February 17th, 2008, 9:40 pm
    Post #7 - February 17th, 2008, 9:40 pm Post #7 - February 17th, 2008, 9:40 pm
    One pretty healthy meal would be pho, depending of course upon the meat chosen. It's not very fattening (assuming the broth has been well skimmed) and there's not much added fat. You also have the option of adding the usual vegetable accompaniments and you end up with a pretty filling meal. So head up to Argyle.

    And I'd also agree with the Japanese recommendation (mostly sushi), but don't forget about sukiyaki (requires minimal oil -- and can be prepared without oil) which you can always find at the very reasonably priced Sunshine Cafe, along with bottomless cups of green tea.

    And don't forget about the many good bbq places in town, where you can get a bbq chicken -- toss aside the skin of you want to be even healthier.
  • Post #8 - February 17th, 2008, 10:01 pm
    Post #8 - February 17th, 2008, 10:01 pm Post #8 - February 17th, 2008, 10:01 pm
    Wiseguy wrote:
    I guess I should have clarified that I'm looking for American food, not ethnic staples that we have all had for years here. And you're right, all of the things you've mentioned have traditional and nutritional value and are good for you. The thing is, when you just want a salad and a rotisserie chicken sandwich for less than $10, where can we go?

    Where's the simple places?


    I know you said "American" food, but if what you're looking for is an affordable salad and rotisserie chicken, I don't see how you could do much better than Semiramis or El Llano/ Brasa Roja.
  • Post #9 - February 17th, 2008, 10:04 pm
    Post #9 - February 17th, 2008, 10:04 pm Post #9 - February 17th, 2008, 10:04 pm
    Wiseguy wrote:I really appreciate the reply.

    I guess I should have clarified that I'm looking for American food, not ethnic staples that we have all had for years here. And you're right, all of the things you've mentioned have traditional and nutritional value and are good for you. The thing is, when you just want a salad and a rotisserie chicken sandwich for less than $10, where can we go?

    All of the food you mentioned I have been having for years, and frankly, I'm burned out on those choices too. I just used Pizza, hot dogs etc...to make my point. Plus, since I consider myself a decent cook, I can make versions of most of that stuff at home for less money and in some instances, tastier than going out.

    But to me, making salads with tons of different vegetables and making rotisserie chicken and fresh soups can get to be a little more of a chore than making some Thai chicken with cilantro lime rice, or some homemade tacos.

    Where's the simple places?


    I'll admit that I don't typically eat the kind of healthy, inexpensive meal (salad and chicken sandwich) that you're looking for. But off the top of my head...

    Al-Khaymeih has great chicken shawarma sandwiches which are inexpensive. I haven't tried any of their salads.

    Wishbone usually has a couple salads for <$10, as well as some chicken sandwiches. My favorite dish is the vegetarian platter, which is a choice of three side items (some of which, despite the name, aren't vegetarian). Good variety, including both healthy (Hoppin John) and unhealthy (mac & cheese) options.

    Salad Spinners has a zillion salad options. Several locations downtown.

    Schoolyard Tavern (and other restaurants owned by the same group) has traditional American fare with a twist that's a couple steps above your typical bar food. They do offer chicken sandwiches and salads (though I admit I've never had them because I love their fish tacos).
  • Post #10 - February 17th, 2008, 10:13 pm
    Post #10 - February 17th, 2008, 10:13 pm Post #10 - February 17th, 2008, 10:13 pm
    Wiseguy...

    I'm totally a sucker for good salady/sandwichey type places, and I've also had trouble finding places I'm happy with. But c'mon, man, you're not stooping to Pockets, are you? :-)

    I haven't been to the Bucktown location and thusly can't speak to it, but I've long been a fan of the West Loop location of Jerry's Sandwiches. There are plenty of abusive selections, but healthy options also abound.
    Dominic Armato
    Dining Critic
    The Arizona Republic and azcentral.com
  • Post #11 - February 17th, 2008, 10:54 pm
    Post #11 - February 17th, 2008, 10:54 pm Post #11 - February 17th, 2008, 10:54 pm
    If I am trying to eat healthy I usually order a salad with dressing on the side so I can control it. I like Chicken Ceasar salad and Asian Chicken Salad. Some places also make a grilled salmon salad. I find these to be healthy more or less unless they are drenched with dressing.

    Also grilled fish and sides of vegetables.
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #12 - February 17th, 2008, 10:57 pm
    Post #12 - February 17th, 2008, 10:57 pm Post #12 - February 17th, 2008, 10:57 pm
    Vella Cafe is all about the healthy.
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #13 - February 17th, 2008, 11:34 pm
    Post #13 - February 17th, 2008, 11:34 pm Post #13 - February 17th, 2008, 11:34 pm
    A couple of other places that come to mind are Milk and Honey and the Couscous House.

    With regard to Soul Vegetarian East, I guess "healthier" would have been a better term than "healthy".
  • Post #14 - February 17th, 2008, 11:35 pm
    Post #14 - February 17th, 2008, 11:35 pm Post #14 - February 17th, 2008, 11:35 pm
    Amitabul is Korean vegan on Milwaukee Avenue, just north of where Elston intersects it. Absolutely fabulous food. I'm a huge carnivore and I don't even notice that there's no meat on my plate. Spicy, flavorful and extremely healthy. There are people who frequent the restaurant who've switched many of their meals to Amitabul and lost vast quantities of weight. Chef Dave is an extremely welcoming and friendly host. Highly recommended.

    Amitabul
    6207 N Milwaukee Ave
    Chicago, IL 60646
    (773) 774-0276
  • Post #15 - February 18th, 2008, 12:18 am
    Post #15 - February 18th, 2008, 12:18 am Post #15 - February 18th, 2008, 12:18 am
    I can't believe it's taken this long to mention GNR Healthy Food Lithuanian:

    http://www.lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.php?t=15096

    Bacon is healthy. Try to convince me otherwise. PieLady, please back me up here.
  • Post #16 - February 18th, 2008, 10:07 am
    Post #16 - February 18th, 2008, 10:07 am Post #16 - February 18th, 2008, 10:07 am
    I totally understand and agree with the OP on lack of healthy fast food choices but understand there are options. My wife and I shot over to Crust yesterday for a light lunch. One flat bread pizza, a cup of turkey chili, and a large salad for eats and an Italian Pomegranate soda for me and decaf tea for her for drinks. Total was about $30. The drinks were about $6 and the salad was too big to finish at $8 (they offer a smaller salad for less $) but overall it was healthy and organic. I know they want to turn this into a chain and if they do, it may curb your healthy appetite.

    The other thing to take in account is the portion size. I think many of the quick bite restaurants or even bars have larger than needed portions. My wife and I often split a chicken sandwich (or burger) and a side salad instead of ordering two full sandwiches and fries.

    I would gladly accept creative ordering over a "healthy fast food" chain options (as I typically can't stand chain restaurants) as its often not what's offered but what's ordered.
  • Post #17 - February 18th, 2008, 11:31 am
    Post #17 - February 18th, 2008, 11:31 am Post #17 - February 18th, 2008, 11:31 am
    Actually, I take issue with the O.P.'s presumptive, ingratiating "we." And, this notion that you can only eat healthily at "health food restaurants." Yeesh. How myopic can you get? You eat and order however *you* decide wherever you dine.
    Being gauche rocks, stun the bourgeoisie
  • Post #18 - February 18th, 2008, 11:59 am
    Post #18 - February 18th, 2008, 11:59 am Post #18 - February 18th, 2008, 11:59 am
    You know- <b>WiseGuy</b>, you have "hit the nail on the head" for me.

    Manytimes I have bemoaned the fact- of the "dearth" of Salad Bar options (that don't wind up costing $13.00 when you get all of those yummies in the container up @ The Cashier @ Whole Paycheck).
    Living in Logan Square - I've noticed there are NO salad bars,no healthy Salad serving restaurants, w/in a 2 mile radius- AND few places for The New York Times (but- that's a different rant!).
    By comparison to other 'hoods in Chicago, near, say Clark & Diversey, you'll find more than dozen Salad/Healthy eating options!

    Trying to do the no carb/Healthy diet b4, I find it extremely frustrating.
    OK- I'll do a <b>Mr. Pollo</b> on Sacramento (with out my fried Yucca).
    OK- I'll do a mixed Shawarma <i>meat-on-a-Plate-no-bread-sandwich</i> @ <b>Al Kyamieh</b>,
    or the fabulosus Fattoush (without The Pita croutons)..
    OK- I'll entertain <b>Vella</b> (but- it's pricey, for what it is)....
    but, then the pickins are slim (NOT my waistline, which is the objective here)

    Maybe, Chicago is destined to become it's SNL stereotype of 2 "guys" chockin' down the PorkChop samwiches @ da Coaches restaurant!

    Say it ain't so.
  • Post #19 - February 18th, 2008, 12:18 pm
    Post #19 - February 18th, 2008, 12:18 pm Post #19 - February 18th, 2008, 12:18 pm
    Christopher Gordon wrote:Actually, I take issue with the O.P.'s presumptive, ingratiating "we." And, this notion that you can only eat healthily at "health food restaurants." Yeesh. How myopic can you get? You eat and order however *you* decide wherever you dine.


    Don't be so sensitive! :)

    People use "we" all the time and no one seems to mind: "We in Chicago deserve better."

    So you don't agree with Wiseguy's view. Is he supposed to abandon common language usage? And where did he say that you have to go to a health food restaurant in order to eat healthy? He asked about restaurants that specialize in low-cost, healthy food. Whether you frequent these establishments or not, this is clearly a well-recognized restaurant genre. How is this question different from someone asking where the best barbecue joints are?

    YourPalWill wrote an excellent, useful reply. Others offered other good suggestions. I'll be referencing them often. If you don't have something nice to say...
  • Post #20 - February 18th, 2008, 12:33 pm
    Post #20 - February 18th, 2008, 12:33 pm Post #20 - February 18th, 2008, 12:33 pm
    when you just want a salad and a rotisserie chicken sandwich for less than $10, where can we go?


    Just a note Wiseguy- that at most "Pollo Rostizado" establishments (eg.<b>Mr. Pollo</b>, <b>Flying Chicken Restaurant</b> on Lincoln,) you can get a fine 1/4 of a rotisseried chicken and a side/or 2 for $6.00- quite a "value meal" IMHO.

    Also, when ordering the scrumptious, blissful Chicken Boti @ <b>Khans BBQ</b>, there is a complimentary "Salad" of cukes/onions/iceberg included.

    AND - a new discovery, for me, is <b>VIOLET</b>, 3819 N. Southport- I had some wonderfullly "inspired" American cooking...I ate a fresh Broccoli and Aged White Cheddar soup the other day, that was so tasty, with a puree of Broccoli, as bright Green as any Leprachaun you'' ever see! - and a Mixed Green & Maytag Blue Cheese salad w/ little "croutons" of deep fried (I know) Zucchini rounds...


    VIOLET
    3819 N. Southport
    Chicago,ILL.
    773.327.0234
    breakfast and Lunch
  • Post #21 - February 18th, 2008, 1:12 pm
    Post #21 - February 18th, 2008, 1:12 pm Post #21 - February 18th, 2008, 1:12 pm
    jbambuti wrote:Amitabul is Korean vegan on Milwaukee Avenue, just north of where Elston intersects it. Absolutely fabulous food. I'm a huge carnivore and I don't even notice that there's no meat on my plate. Spicy, flavorful and extremely healthy. There are people who frequent the restaurant who've switched many of their meals to Amitabul and lost vast quantities of weight. Chef Dave is an extremely welcoming and friendly host. Highly recommended.

    Amitabul
    6207 N Milwaukee Ave
    Chicago, IL 60646
    (773) 774-0276


    Yes! Thank you! Amitabul is one of my favorite restaurants that gets little love around here. I have been meaning to haul the Canon up there and publish an extensive post of the joys of vegan Buddhist cuisine. This is practically the only restaurant that my girlfriend enjoys consistently. At first she had to drag me all that way up Milwaukee Ave- I am a tenacious carnivore after all. But I do appreciate a meal that uplifts the health and spirit. Many of the dishes have a serious burn due to a heavy hand with the Korean chili pastes, which is probably how they have worked their way into my heart. I have to admit though, once I discovered the joy and ease of cooking with gochujang, it is a little less appealing shlepping my way up to Jeff. Park. I find a meal at Amitabul with Chef Dave to be a comforting and restorative experience that for me represents everything that qualifies a top notch neighborhood restaurant!
  • Post #22 - February 18th, 2008, 1:33 pm
    Post #22 - February 18th, 2008, 1:33 pm Post #22 - February 18th, 2008, 1:33 pm
    I love the salad specials at Milk and Honey. http://www.milkandhoneycafe.com
    I often wonder why there aren't more great soup and salad joints in this city, especially during these punishing months...
  • Post #23 - February 18th, 2008, 1:46 pm
    Post #23 - February 18th, 2008, 1:46 pm Post #23 - February 18th, 2008, 1:46 pm
    Darren72 wrote:
    Christopher Gordon wrote:Actually, I take issue with the O.P.'s presumptive, ingratiating "we." And, this notion that you can only eat healthily at "health food restaurants." Yeesh. How myopic can you get? You eat and order however *you* decide wherever you dine.


    Don't be so sensitive! :)

    People use "we" all the time and no one seems to mind: "We in Chicago deserve better."

    So you don't agree with Wiseguy's view. Is he supposed to abandon common language usage? And where did he say that you have to go to a health food restaurant in order to eat healthy? He asked about restaurants that specialize in low-cost, healthy food. Whether you frequent these establishments or not, this is clearly a well-recognized restaurant genre. How is this question different from someone asking where the best barbecue joints are?

    YourPalWill wrote an excellent, useful reply. Others offered other good suggestions. I'll be referencing them often. If you don't have something nice to say...


    It's not common usage(I don't use it...my friends don't use it). This deployment of "we," or "us," or, even "hey folks" is at it's most benign, colloquial. I'm not someone else's "we," or "us, or "folks." Again, it's an ingratiation and a presumption. It's off-putting.

    And, yes, there are some bizarre assumptions in the OP's post which I've been surprised to see iterated in many of the comments; that Chicago isn't a "healthy eats" town. That "healthy eats" = chicken breast and a salad. I realize how pervasive and insidious this heavily-advertised trend is towards "diets, and "calorie counting," and "lifestyles." Similarly, I'm eliding an implication that "other cities" are "healthier" = West Coast deification. Good advertising at work! Chicago has great farmer's markets and a vast diversity of restaurants. You can eat healthy in any of them...and by this I intend that even a fry-o-lator haven is "healthy"...if you don't eat there...every*freaking*day.

    And I stand by my earlier comment; you decide how much and what you eat. You can find "healthy" options at BK as much as at Karen's(print whatever bandwagonesque ideology here). Here's an idea; eat anything and everything IN MODERATION.
    Being gauche rocks, stun the bourgeoisie
  • Post #24 - February 18th, 2008, 2:08 pm
    Post #24 - February 18th, 2008, 2:08 pm Post #24 - February 18th, 2008, 2:08 pm
    Wiseguy wrote:I I was on the West Coast and in L.A and San Francisco they have some really good places to get a salad, sandwiches and some sides all reasonably priced and with multiple locations.


    In general, I would agree that the options are more limited than I found in the South or in Utah when I worked there.

    Personally, I have been heading to some of the local grocery store and been able to find healthier options.
  • Post #25 - February 18th, 2008, 3:17 pm
    Post #25 - February 18th, 2008, 3:17 pm Post #25 - February 18th, 2008, 3:17 pm
    Christopher Gordon wrote:
    Darren72 wrote:
    Christopher Gordon wrote:Actually, I take issue with the O.P.'s presumptive, ingratiating "we." And, this notion that you can only eat healthily at "health food restaurants." Yeesh. How myopic can you get? You eat and order however *you* decide wherever you dine.


    Don't be so sensitive! :)

    People use "we" all the time and no one seems to mind: "We in Chicago deserve better."

    So you don't agree with Wiseguy's view. Is he supposed to abandon common language usage? And where did he say that you have to go to a health food restaurant in order to eat healthy? He asked about restaurants that specialize in low-cost, healthy food. Whether you frequent these establishments or not, this is clearly a well-recognized restaurant genre. How is this question different from someone asking where the best barbecue joints are?

    YourPalWill wrote an excellent, useful reply. Others offered other good suggestions. I'll be referencing them often. If you don't have something nice to say...


    It's not common usage(I don't use it...my friends don't use it). This deployment of "we," or "us," or, even "hey folks" is at it's most benign, colloquial. I'm not someone else's "we," or "us, or "folks." Again, it's an ingratiation and a presumption. It's off-putting.

    And, yes, there are some bizarre assumptions in the OP's post which I've been surprised to see iterated in many of the comments; that Chicago isn't a "healthy eats" town. That "healthy eats" = chicken breast and a salad. I realize how pervasive and insidious this heavily-advertised trend is towards "diets, and "calorie counting," and "lifestyles." Similarly, I'm eliding an implication that "other cities" are "healthier" = West Coast deification. Good advertising at work! Chicago has great farmer's markets and a vast diversity of restaurants. You can eat healthy in any of them...and by this I intend that even a fry-o-lator haven is "healthy"...if you don't eat there...every*freaking*day.

    And I stand by my earlier comment; you decide how much and what you eat. You can find "healthy" options at BK as much as at Karen's(print whatever bandwagonesque ideology here). Here's an idea; eat anything and everything IN MODERATION.


    Sorry, I should have said I instead of WE.

    Sheesh... Mr. English Professor posts in the LTHforums, I guess, lol

    ANYWAY...

    I was just trying convey a simple message about a simple request, and you seem to take it to the level that I am insinuating people can't eat healthy anywhere they go, while trying to pick apart my written grammar.

    Wow, what uptight people there are on this forum, along with some really HELPFUL AND COURTEOUS PEOPLE, who don't read into things and ASSume.

    I'm sure everybody can agree that you can get "healthy" choices at most any restaurant. But whether those choices are the best choices and the restaurants specialty, is another thing entirely. Sure, I can go to Lou Malnati's and get a salad instead of a pizza, but why would you? When I go out to a restaurant, I go there because they make something I want and that they do well. Most places that serve "fast food" do not have the greatest choices and I don't support mediocrity, thank you very much.

    A big thank you to all of the positive people in this thread who have made some really great suggestions. I hope WE all enjoy eating at healthier choice focused establishments in the future.
  • Post #26 - February 18th, 2008, 3:28 pm
    Post #26 - February 18th, 2008, 3:28 pm Post #26 - February 18th, 2008, 3:28 pm
    Wiseguy wrote:
    Christopher Gordon wrote:
    Darren72 wrote:
    Christopher Gordon wrote:Actually, I take issue with the O.P.'s presumptive, ingratiating "we." And, this notion that you can only eat healthily at "health food restaurants." Yeesh. How myopic can you get? You eat and order however *you* decide wherever you dine.


    Don't be so sensitive! :)

    People use "we" all the time and no one seems to mind: "We in Chicago deserve better."

    So you don't agree with Wiseguy's view. Is he supposed to abandon common language usage? And where did he say that you have to go to a health food restaurant in order to eat healthy? He asked about restaurants that specialize in low-cost, healthy food. Whether you frequent these establishments or not, this is clearly a well-recognized restaurant genre. How is this question different from someone asking where the best barbecue joints are?

    YourPalWill wrote an excellent, useful reply. Others offered other good suggestions. I'll be referencing them often. If you don't have something nice to say...


    It's not common usage(I don't use it...my friends don't use it). This deployment of "we," or "us," or, even "hey folks" is at it's most benign, colloquial. I'm not someone else's "we," or "us, or "folks." Again, it's an ingratiation and a presumption. It's off-putting.

    And, yes, there are some bizarre assumptions in the OP's post which I've been surprised to see iterated in many of the comments; that Chicago isn't a "healthy eats" town. That "healthy eats" = chicken breast and a salad. I realize how pervasive and insidious this heavily-advertised trend is towards "diets, and "calorie counting," and "lifestyles." Similarly, I'm eliding an implication that "other cities" are "healthier" = West Coast deification. Good advertising at work! Chicago has great farmer's markets and a vast diversity of restaurants. You can eat healthy in any of them...and by this I intend that even a fry-o-lator haven is "healthy"...if you don't eat there...every*freaking*day.

    And I stand by my earlier comment; you decide how much and what you eat. You can find "healthy" options at BK as much as at Karen's(print whatever bandwagonesque ideology here). Here's an idea; eat anything and everything IN MODERATION.


    Sorry, I should have said I instead of WE.

    Sheesh... Mr. English Professor posts in the LTHforums, I guess, lol

    ANYWAY...

    I was just trying convey a simple message about a simple request, and you seem to take it to the level that I am insinuating people can't eat healthy anywhere they go, while trying to pick apart my written grammar.

    Wow, what uptight people there are on this forum, along with some really HELPFUL AND COURTEOUS PEOPLE, who don't read into things and ASSume.

    I'm sure everybody can agree that you can get "healthy" choices at most any restaurant. But whether those choices are the best choices and the restaurants specialty, is another thing entirely. Sure, I can go to Lou Malnati's and get a salad instead of a pizza, but why would you? When I go out to a restaurant, I go there because they make something I want and that they do well. Most places that serve "fast food" do not have the greatest choices and I don't support mediocrity, thank you very much.

    A big thank you to all of the positive people in this thread who have made some really great suggestions. I hope WE all enjoy eating at healthier choice focused establishments in the future.


    Yet again further misapprehensions...why is fast food "mediocrity?" And nowhere did I say you had to order a (yummy imo)salad at Lou Malnati's...how about restricting yourself to a slice or two of their awesome pizza? Eat there only once in awhile? Take the rest home? Save it for another day?

    What is this cult of the "soup and salad place?" You see these horrific commercials in which cackling kaffeeklatsches devour breadsticks and bottomless bowls of industrial gazpacho. As if that's "healthy" and not just the desired result of Leo Burnett propaganda.

    Why does that = "healthy eating?"

    I wish you didn't take mere criticism for negativity.

    As for Mr. English Professor, Wiseguy...um...I wasn't correcting your grammar or syntax...I opined that presuming to speak for a perceived population is squicky...
    Being gauche rocks, stun the bourgeoisie
  • Post #27 - February 18th, 2008, 4:01 pm
    Post #27 - February 18th, 2008, 4:01 pm Post #27 - February 18th, 2008, 4:01 pm
    Christopher Gordon wrote:
    Wiseguy wrote:
    Christopher Gordon wrote:
    Darren72 wrote:
    Christopher Gordon wrote:Actually, I take issue with the O.P.'s presumptive, ingratiating "we." And, this notion that you can only eat healthily at "health food restaurants." Yeesh. How myopic can you get? You eat and order however *you* decide wherever you dine.


    Don't be so sensitive! :)

    People use "we" all the time and no one seems to mind: "We in Chicago deserve better."

    So you don't agree with Wiseguy's view. Is he supposed to abandon common language usage? And where did he say that you have to go to a health food restaurant in order to eat healthy? He asked about restaurants that specialize in low-cost, healthy food. Whether you frequent these establishments or not, this is clearly a well-recognized restaurant genre. How is this question different from someone asking where the best barbecue joints are?

    YourPalWill wrote an excellent, useful reply. Others offered other good suggestions. I'll be referencing them often. If you don't have something nice to say...


    It's not common usage(I don't use it...my friends don't use it). This deployment of "we," or "us," or, even "hey folks" is at it's most benign, colloquial. I'm not someone else's "we," or "us, or "folks." Again, it's an ingratiation and a presumption. It's off-putting.

    And, yes, there are some bizarre assumptions in the OP's post which I've been surprised to see iterated in many of the comments; that Chicago isn't a "healthy eats" town. That "healthy eats" = chicken breast and a salad. I realize how pervasive and insidious this heavily-advertised trend is towards "diets, and "calorie counting," and "lifestyles." Similarly, I'm eliding an implication that "other cities" are "healthier" = West Coast deification. Good advertising at work! Chicago has great farmer's markets and a vast diversity of restaurants. You can eat healthy in any of them...and by this I intend that even a fry-o-lator haven is "healthy"...if you don't eat there...every*freaking*day.

    And I stand by my earlier comment; you decide how much and what you eat. You can find "healthy" options at BK as much as at Karen's(print whatever bandwagonesque ideology here). Here's an idea; eat anything and everything IN MODERATION.


    Sorry, I should have said I instead of WE.

    Sheesh... Mr. English Professor posts in the LTHforums, I guess, lol

    ANYWAY...

    I was just trying convey a simple message about a simple request, and you seem to take it to the level that I am insinuating people can't eat healthy anywhere they go, while trying to pick apart my written grammar.

    Wow, what uptight people there are on this forum, along with some really HELPFUL AND COURTEOUS PEOPLE, who don't read into things and ASSume.

    I'm sure everybody can agree that you can get "healthy" choices at most any restaurant. But whether those choices are the best choices and the restaurants specialty, is another thing entirely. Sure, I can go to Lou Malnati's and get a salad instead of a pizza, but why would you? When I go out to a restaurant, I go there because they make something I want and that they do well. Most places that serve "fast food" do not have the greatest choices and I don't support mediocrity, thank you very much.

    A big thank you to all of the positive people in this thread who have made some really great suggestions. I hope WE all enjoy eating at healthier choice focused establishments in the future.


    Yet again further misapprehensions...why is fast food "mediocrity?" And nowhere did I say you had to order a (yummy imo)salad at Lou Malnati's...how about restricting yourself to a slice or two of their awesome pizza? Eat there only once in awhile? Take the rest home? Save it for another day?

    What is this cult of the "soup and salad place?" You see these horrific commercials in which cackling kaffeeklatsches devour breadsticks and bottomless bowls of industrial gazpacho. As if that's "healthy" and not just the desired result of Leo Burnett propaganda.

    Why does that = "healthy eating?"

    I wish you didn't take mere criticism for negativity.

    As for Mr. English Professor, Wiseguy...um...I wasn't correcting your grammar or syntax...I opined that presuming to speak for a perceived population is squicky...


    But it is negativity, you lambaste my posts with your high & mighty attitude about a simple post in a forum. And why do you have to bring your socio political philosophies into a thread about food? Lighten the f$@% up, please. I swear, I start posting here for two days now and some of you people are forum n00bs as far as cutting people slack for their written words, reading into thoughts and being asses. WORDS FAIL US.

    If you and I were having this conversation is person, you wouldn't say any of this to me, you'd just listen and if you didn't like what I was saying, you can walk.

    WE KNOW you can get healthy choices anywhere at anytime, and yes, I only have one or two pieces of pizza at Lou's. And I have had their salad, delicious, especially with their less than healthy homemade Gorgonzola dressing.

    Please, leave the conspiracies theories about my wanting society and advertisers to change everything into "healthy" at the reply button , thanks.

    I just wanted to see what people thought were some good places for some food, it's that simple. And I wanted to make the thread interesting so I guess I put myself out there for my head to get chopped off for saying that Chicago doesn't have many healthy choices and as far as inexpensive places, which from growing up here, is true IN MY OPINION.
  • Post #28 - February 18th, 2008, 4:33 pm
    Post #28 - February 18th, 2008, 4:33 pm Post #28 - February 18th, 2008, 4:33 pm
    Relax folks, its only food. :twisted:
    Christopher Gordon wrote:...What is this cult of the "soup and salad place?" You see these horrific commercials in which cackling kaffeeklatsches devour breadsticks and bottomless bowls of industrial gazpacho. As if that's "healthy" and not just the desired result of Leo Burnett propaganda. ...

    Lol. Sign me up for the cult. I happen to like salads, and soup - and can't seem to find too many places that do them really well.
  • Post #29 - February 18th, 2008, 4:38 pm
    Post #29 - February 18th, 2008, 4:38 pm Post #29 - February 18th, 2008, 4:38 pm
    jmc wrote:Relax folks, its only food. :twisted:
    Christopher Gordon wrote:...What is this cult of the "soup and salad place?" You see these horrific commercials in which cackling kaffeeklatsches devour breadsticks and bottomless bowls of industrial gazpacho. As if that's "healthy" and not just the desired result of Leo Burnett propaganda. ...

    Lol. Sign me up for the cult. I happen to like salads, and soup - and can't seem to find too many places that do them really well.

    I think you can find plenty of them that LeoB makes ads for.
  • Post #30 - February 18th, 2008, 4:40 pm
    Post #30 - February 18th, 2008, 4:40 pm Post #30 - February 18th, 2008, 4:40 pm
    nr706 wrote:
    jmc wrote:Relax folks, its only food. :twisted:
    Christopher Gordon wrote:...What is this cult of the "soup and salad place?" You see these horrific commercials in which cackling kaffeeklatsches devour breadsticks and bottomless bowls of industrial gazpacho. As if that's "healthy" and not just the desired result of Leo Burnett propaganda. ...

    Lol. Sign me up for the cult. I happen to like salads, and soup - and can't seem to find too many places that do them really well.

    I think you can find plenty of them that LeoB makes ads for.


    Panera? :P

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