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Cemitas Puebla [was Taqueria Puebla]

Cemitas Puebla [was Taqueria Puebla]
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  • Post #61 - October 18th, 2008, 1:26 pm
    Post #61 - October 18th, 2008, 1:26 pm Post #61 - October 18th, 2008, 1:26 pm
    I happened to be driving on North a few minutes ago and looked over at Cemitas Puebla. Totally packed. I hear he's already taking lessons from Burt and Schwa on how to discourage business. :twisted: Seriously, what a nice success story for an interesting food.
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  • Post #62 - October 18th, 2008, 1:35 pm
    Post #62 - October 18th, 2008, 1:35 pm Post #62 - October 18th, 2008, 1:35 pm
    can someone post a Youtube link, i can't find it. thanks, justjoan
  • Post #63 - October 18th, 2008, 1:54 pm
    Post #63 - October 18th, 2008, 1:54 pm Post #63 - October 18th, 2008, 1:54 pm
    justjoan wrote:can someone post a Youtube link, i can't find it. thanks, justjoan


    It is on their website:
    http://www.cemitaspuebla.com/
  • Post #64 - October 18th, 2008, 2:28 pm
    Post #64 - October 18th, 2008, 2:28 pm Post #64 - October 18th, 2008, 2:28 pm
    thanks for pointing out what i would have seen if i'd gone to the new website. the video is great and, not surprisingly, tony is exceptionally charismatic. his friendliness, sense of humor and graciousness which are evident in person, come across very strongly on this show. he's a tv star in the making. i hope some of his new fans will continue to show up. the place was empty when i was there this week for lunch. (before the show aired). justjoan
  • Post #65 - October 18th, 2008, 3:18 pm
    Post #65 - October 18th, 2008, 3:18 pm Post #65 - October 18th, 2008, 3:18 pm
    Jamieson22 wrote:
    justjoan wrote:can someone post a Youtube link, i can't find it. thanks, justjoan


    It is on their website:
    http://www.cemitaspuebla.com/

    Gee thanks, now I have to get drool out of the keyboard.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #66 - October 18th, 2008, 5:39 pm
    Post #66 - October 18th, 2008, 5:39 pm Post #66 - October 18th, 2008, 5:39 pm
    the video is great and, not surprisingly, tony is exceptionally charismatic. his friendliness, sense of humor and graciousness which are evident in person, come across very strongly on this show. he's a tv star in the making.


    Not to mention that he's very easy on the eyes. Hubba-hubba! :)

    Guy Fieri seemed as fascinated as I regarding the ideal of using house-made chilpotles and such, and even the notion that there is a LOT of regional Mexican fare here in Chicago. I really like DDD, but a lot of the restos they use are pretty same-y re: what goes into their "secret" chilis, coney dog sauces, etc., etc. I bet a sawbuck that he tries this concoction at one of his joints out in California - I certainly intend to. I have a whole antique canning jar of lovely, aromatic moritas that I don't use nearly as often as I should, and this seems like a GREAT way to use 'em. A lot of the commercial varieties seem to use adobo that tastes as if it was drained out of someone's crankcase. Not good eats!
  • Post #67 - October 18th, 2008, 5:57 pm
    Post #67 - October 18th, 2008, 5:57 pm Post #67 - October 18th, 2008, 5:57 pm
    sundevilpeg- by coincidence, when i ate at TP this week, tony told me very specifically how to make the chipotles in adobo. i'm sure he'll relate the recipe to you, too, if you ask. justjoan
  • Post #68 - October 18th, 2008, 6:24 pm
    Post #68 - October 18th, 2008, 6:24 pm Post #68 - October 18th, 2008, 6:24 pm
    J-Joan -
    Thanks for the tip! Sounds like a plan to me, since I've aleady got the critical ingredient ready to roll. Plus I really want a taco Arabe ASAP! :D

    Muchas gracias,
    sdp
  • Post #69 - October 19th, 2008, 8:58 pm
    Post #69 - October 19th, 2008, 8:58 pm Post #69 - October 19th, 2008, 8:58 pm
    Took the family in for an early dinner on Saturday (what was I thinking !?) only to be turned away because they were out of everything at 5pm. The Arabe spit looked like it had been striped clean by locusts and the last cemitas coming out of the kitchen were being served on baguettes :shock:.
  • Post #70 - October 28th, 2008, 5:38 pm
    Post #70 - October 28th, 2008, 5:38 pm Post #70 - October 28th, 2008, 5:38 pm
    JSM wrote:Took the family in for an early dinner on Saturday (what was I thinking !?) only to be turned away because they were out of everything at 5pm...


    I repeated your experience the day after, except that it was only 4 pm, and they were out of cemitas. The cone of arabes meat had been shorn down to a spindly stalagmite. This was my second attempt to sample the fabled cemita sammich (see upthread), and since it took me over an hour and 3 buses to get there, I was about to lose my sh*t. Someone was guarding the door (from the pictures, I believe it was Tony), and as before, apologized before offering me a handwritten 10% coupon good for my next visit. After relating my tale of woe, he kindly relented, and let my friend and myself in, albeit with the caution that they were out of cemitas. Guess, I'll be taking that 72 bus one more time.

    Between the two of us, we split 8 tacos arabes and a plate of chalupas. My take on the tacos: excellent and worth every bit of praise that has been lauded. The smokiness of the adobo mingled well with the sweetness of the grilled onions, but what really appealed to me was how crispy the meat was. Fantastic. The chalupas were good and filled up the corners nicely.

    I shall return, although I remain somewhat skeptical regarding the Cemita. I just can't envision what sets it apart in terms of flavor from say...a torta. It must be that sesame bun, apparently homemade, which tends to run out and precipitates an early closure. Third time may prove the charm though, as I have resolved to hit them up at 11 am, when they open.
  • Post #71 - October 28th, 2008, 5:45 pm
    Post #71 - October 28th, 2008, 5:45 pm Post #71 - October 28th, 2008, 5:45 pm
    titus wong wrote:Third time may prove the charm though, as I have resolved to hit them up at 11 am, when they open.


    Go mid-day during the week. You'll be much happier.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #72 - October 28th, 2008, 6:27 pm
    Post #72 - October 28th, 2008, 6:27 pm Post #72 - October 28th, 2008, 6:27 pm
    titus wong wrote:I shall return, although I remain somewhat skeptical regarding the Cemita. I just can't envision what sets it apart in terms of flavor from say...a torta. It must be that sesame bun, apparently homemade, which tends to run out and precipitates an early closure.

    The proprietary bread -- density-wise, it's more a roll than a bun -- is definitely excellent and distinctive but the other differences between a Cemitas Puebla cemita and a torta are these (as far as I can tell):

    The cemitas at Cemitas Puebla have a schmear of that distinctive house-made chipotle pepper mash, whereas a torta generally has pickled jalapeno.

    Tortas often have frijoles refritos but the cemita has no beans at all.

    Tortas usually have pretty generic chihuahua-type cheese on them but the Cemitas Puebla cemitas have the excellent Oaxacan cheese, which has a certain funk to it.

    Tortas usually contain lettuce and tomato. Cemitas at CP have neither.

    Last of all -- and certainly not least -- the quality of the meats on the cemitas at CP are a level above what I've had on most tortas. In fact, I think tortas are often places where average meats go to hide. The Cemitas Puebla cemita is a showcase for the excellent meats produced there . . .

    Image
    Cemita Atomica (milanesa, jamon and enchilada)

    I think once you end up having a cemita at CP, you'll really appreciate it. Of course, it is just a sandwich and perhaps, given how much you've been through in your quest to experience one, it won't live up to the hype.

    =R=
    Gardening is a bloodsport --Meghan Kleeman

    Why don't you take these profiteroles and put them up your shi'-ta-holes? --Jemaine & Bret

    There's a horse loose in a hospital --JM

    That don't impress me much --Shania Twain
  • Post #73 - October 28th, 2008, 6:54 pm
    Post #73 - October 28th, 2008, 6:54 pm Post #73 - October 28th, 2008, 6:54 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:In fact, I think tortas are often places where average meats go to hide.


    Ronnie, I usually agree with most everything you say (regarding food!) but never more so! Most tortas in Chicago seem to be made of some funky, tough, gray donkey meat that came from some seriously aged burro... Obviously there are some notable exceptions but CP is certainly a cut above. I have never felt like, for my own piece of mind, I needed to fight the urge to open the sandwich and see what was inside here like a number of other spots.
  • Post #74 - October 28th, 2008, 7:01 pm
    Post #74 - October 28th, 2008, 7:01 pm Post #74 - October 28th, 2008, 7:01 pm
    ...plus, tony's father personally travels to mexico about every 6 weeks to pick up the special cheese for the cemitas. it is stringy, in a good way, rather than melting, and it's delicious. justjoan
  • Post #75 - October 28th, 2008, 9:01 pm
    Post #75 - October 28th, 2008, 9:01 pm Post #75 - October 28th, 2008, 9:01 pm
    Thanks everyone for chiming in, and especially to Ronnie for his well illustrated tutorial. Now that I have been schooled in the differences, the question that I've been turning over is 'Why didn't I just ask them to make me up a cemita on torta bread?' Had they not let me in the door, I probably should have. JSM mentioned that he saw some made up on baguettes. Do you think the subtraction of the proprietary bread would make alot of difference?
  • Post #76 - November 5th, 2008, 1:11 pm
    Post #76 - November 5th, 2008, 1:11 pm Post #76 - November 5th, 2008, 1:11 pm
    Taqueria Puebla is right now at th top of my list of GNR's to try(right up there with Captain Porky's).

    I have a couple of questions before my 1st visit:

    1) credit cards or cash only
    2) I am interested in the following menu items 1) the carne enchilada cemita 2) the carne asada cemita 3) the taco arabes. Are these good choices, and should I order anything else?

    thanks for any tips/feedback
  • Post #77 - November 5th, 2008, 1:23 pm
    Post #77 - November 5th, 2008, 1:23 pm Post #77 - November 5th, 2008, 1:23 pm
    jimswside wrote:Taqueria Puebla is right now at th top of my list of GNR's to try(right up there with Captain Porky's).

    I have a couple of questions before my 1st visit:

    1) credit cards or cash only
    2) I am interested in the following menu items 1) the carne enchilada cemita 2) the carne asada cemita 3) the taco arabes. Are these good choices, and should I order anything else?

    thanks for any tips/feedback


    Website says CC are accepted. They also have a 10% off coupon:
    http://www.cemitaspuebla.com/index_files/Page491.htm

    Does anyone know when they changed their name to Cemitas Puebla? Don't remeber this but don't pay too close attention to things ;)

    I'd say try the Milanesa as well, or just go for the Cemita Atomica which has carne milanesa, carne enhilada and jamon. An Atomica and 2 tacos arabes would be a nice healthy and delicious lunch!

    Jamie
  • Post #78 - November 5th, 2008, 1:25 pm
    Post #78 - November 5th, 2008, 1:25 pm Post #78 - November 5th, 2008, 1:25 pm
    thank you, i am sure my wife, our 2 year old daughter and I will enjoy it.
  • Post #79 - November 5th, 2008, 2:02 pm
    Post #79 - November 5th, 2008, 2:02 pm Post #79 - November 5th, 2008, 2:02 pm
    Jamieson22 wrote:Does anyone know when they changed their name to Cemitas Puebla? Don't remeber this but don't pay too close attention to things ;)

    No later than 8:15 AM on Jan 25, 2007....
  • Post #80 - November 5th, 2008, 3:01 pm
    Post #80 - November 5th, 2008, 3:01 pm Post #80 - November 5th, 2008, 3:01 pm
    i would go for their cemita arabe. you are combining two in house specialties that way, the spit roasted pork and onions, with the Cemita. i also think their Carne Asada Cemita is good; im almost sure its cooked over flames
  • Post #81 - November 5th, 2008, 3:07 pm
    Post #81 - November 5th, 2008, 3:07 pm Post #81 - November 5th, 2008, 3:07 pm
    MBK wrote:i would go for their cemita arabe. you are combining two in house specialties that way, the spit roasted pork and onions, with the Cemita. i also think their Carne Asada Cemita is good; im almost sure its cooked over flames



    3 hungry folks to feed so I am going to sample a few items. thanks for the tip.
  • Post #82 - November 5th, 2008, 4:33 pm
    Post #82 - November 5th, 2008, 4:33 pm Post #82 - November 5th, 2008, 4:33 pm
    jimswside wrote:Taqueria Puebla is right now at th top of my list of GNR's to try(right up there with Captain Porky's).

    I have a couple of questions before my 1st visit:

    1) credit cards or cash only
    2) I am interested in the following menu items 1) the carne enchilada cemita 2) the carne asada cemita 3) the taco arabes. Are these good choices, and should I order anything else?

    thanks for any tips/feedback


    I was there yesterday and it's going strong. Despite what their website might say I'm not sure they really take credit cards, so a call ahead would be advised if you plan on using one. If it were me, I'd change your items 1 & 2 to a cemita de milinase and a cemita atomica. Those are my go to items along with the taco arabe.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #83 - November 5th, 2008, 6:30 pm
    Post #83 - November 5th, 2008, 6:30 pm Post #83 - November 5th, 2008, 6:30 pm
    they do take credit cards. i paid with a visa two weeks ago :shock: but i prefer to give them cash when i can
  • Post #84 - November 9th, 2008, 8:06 am
    Post #84 - November 9th, 2008, 8:06 am Post #84 - November 9th, 2008, 8:06 am
    If Taqueria/Cemitas Puebla is too crowded basking in the sunlight of television fame, there is an alternative that makes very similar Pueblan specialties and is utterly unknown to TV or much of anyone else (though this just appeared). It's called Cemitas China Poblana, La China Poblana is a sort of patron saint of the city of Puebla, and it's a tiny little hole in the wall in Brighton Park, a narrow spot with inch-thick tile on the wall and all the atmosphere of a bus terminal. Nevertheless, the people are sincerely dedicated to doing everything right and not only cook up your milanesa fresh when you order but they too grow their own papalo in season (importing it the rest of the year) and offer other Pueblan specialties such as tacos arabe and, the woman promised when I spoke to her a few months back, chiles en nogada in the fall and winter.

    I went to both within a short space and after a slightly underexciting Cemitas Puebla experience-- probably just an off night-- China Poblana emerged the clear winner for bright and fresh flavors. A good cemita is a wonderful thing, a bad one is a terrible one, and Cemitas China Poblana that day made perhaps the best I've had yet.

    Image

    Cemitas China Poblana
    4231B S. Archer
    Chicago IL
    773-847-8048
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  • Post #85 - November 11th, 2008, 3:07 pm
    Post #85 - November 11th, 2008, 3:07 pm Post #85 - November 11th, 2008, 3:07 pm
    Um..no offense but how can that be called a cemita? There isn't even the right cheese on it....that looks like queso blanco which is used in many quesadillas. I think you should really give Cemitas Puebla another try it's really a world of difference and I don't think fame. I actually was in a study abroad program in Mexico City and visited Puebla where I had an official Cemita and let me tell you Cemitas Puebla is EXACTLY like the one I had in Puebla. The bun, the avocado, the mound of cheese it was delicious! Of course when I came back I had to go back to Cemitas Puebla to get my cemita fix (totally worth the 20 minute wait). I also tried the original taco arabe in Puebla, and I must admit, I found Cemita Puebla's meat way more tender and full of juicy flavor...I think I'll have to make another run there tonight now that I said that :lol:
  • Post #86 - November 11th, 2008, 5:11 pm
    Post #86 - November 11th, 2008, 5:11 pm Post #86 - November 11th, 2008, 5:11 pm
    i drove by TP today twice. once about 1pm and again at 4pm. neither time was it even half full. just FYI. justjoan
  • Post #87 - November 21st, 2008, 7:41 am
    Post #87 - November 21st, 2008, 7:41 am Post #87 - November 21st, 2008, 7:41 am
    Is BYOB frowned upon here? I would really enjoy a few beers when I visit tomorrow.
  • Post #88 - November 21st, 2008, 11:51 am
    Post #88 - November 21st, 2008, 11:51 am Post #88 - November 21st, 2008, 11:51 am
    jimswside wrote:Is BYOB frowned upon here? I would really enjoy a few beers when I visit tomorrow.


    Hi Jim. Upthread, Cemita reported bringing in a bottle of wine with no issues and that there is a liquor store called Andy's directly across the street. I've been to Andy's before and don't remember anything beyond the usual domestic and InBev suspects that excited me. For some reason they were closed on a Saturday afternoon when I tried to pick up a few tallboys a week later. There is also a bar I didn't try on the corner of North and No. Central Park if you're out of luck.
  • Post #89 - November 23rd, 2008, 7:00 am
    Post #89 - November 23rd, 2008, 7:00 am Post #89 - November 23rd, 2008, 7:00 am
    We finally made our much anticipated trip down to Cemita's on Saturday afternoon around 4:30 p.m. We were met soon after by Mhays, and her family. The 12 or so tables of Cemita's were pretty much full, and there was a steady stream of customers coming in, eating an leaving. There was also a nice haze of smoke hanging in the air from the grilled meats they were producing. SInce we were going out to dinner after Cemita's we only tried a few items:

    (1) Cemita Atomica - what a great sandwich. This may be the best sandwich in Chicagoland in my opinion. The different textures of the bread, the meats, the avocado, and the cheese really make this sandwich special. The meats are flaovorfull, and the nice little spicy kick really made this sandwich one of the highlights of the day.

    (2) Tacos arabe - these pork tacos off the spit were really good as well. Flavorfull charred meat on a nice tortilla. I concentrated mostly on the Cemita, but liked these tacos as well.

    (2) Mexican Cokes - goota love a place that serves these naturally sweetened sodas.

    The guy running the show behind the counter was freindly, and helpfull. He also treated me, and seemingly everyone like a regular, and just seemed like a nice guy(he was wearing a White Sox hat, so that is probably the case). For such a small storefront they really kicked the food out of the kitchen, it seemed like only minutes after ordering the food was at the table piping hot. Total tab for (1) Cemita Atomica, (2) tacos arabe, and (2) Mexican Cokes - $18 with 10% off internet coupon.

    We will be going back to Cemita's again very soon, a true GNR.
  • Post #90 - December 21st, 2008, 8:58 am
    Post #90 - December 21st, 2008, 8:58 am Post #90 - December 21st, 2008, 8:58 am
    We stopped for lunch at Cemita's on Saturday, and were again impressed, and happy with our visit. Tony was as friendly, and helpfull as usual(typical of all White Sox fans). For a light lunch 3 of us shared a cemita Milanesa, and a Cemita with carne asada. We also had the cheese Chalupas.

    The Chalupas 3 with salsa verde, and 2 with salsa roja were a hit with me, I preferred the salsa verde variety, but enjoyed all. The Cemita's I am a fan of the Atomica from my first visit but we decided to try a couple different ones(although the Milanesa is a part of the Atomica). The Milanesa was excellent. I think pork is this places specialty. The Carne Asada Cemita was good, but the texture of the steak just didnt work as a sandwich for me. I also enjoyed a Mexican Coke with my meal. Not a bad lunch for under $20.

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