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What are you making for dinner tonite?

What are you making for dinner tonite?
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  • Post #2821 - November 26th, 2023, 10:18 am
    Post #2821 - November 26th, 2023, 10:18 am Post #2821 - November 26th, 2023, 10:18 am
    Fresh shrimp lightly marinated with white pepper and soy sauce. Fresh basil, wonton wrap, and fried. Tasty.

    click to enlarge
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    Image
    Image

    Basil, Count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #2822 - November 26th, 2023, 6:53 pm
    Post #2822 - November 26th, 2023, 6:53 pm Post #2822 - November 26th, 2023, 6:53 pm
    A nice and easy dinner prep. A roast and some leftover sides . . .

    Image
    Bone-In Berkshire Pork Roast
    Just love it when I go to the butcher and see one of these in the case, as he doesn't always have them. This was about 2/3 of a full roast, which was a nice size. Cooked it at 250F for a few hours until it reached 135F internal, then blasted it at 450F convection roast for ~6 minutes.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With some leftover/reheated pre-Thanksgiving potato/leek/cheese gratin and an orphaned little buddy of some creamed spinach that I made for Thanksgiving.

    Later, dessert was a leftover piece -- a coveted corner, no less -- of the pecan slab pie I made for Thanksgiving . . .

    Image
    Claire Saffitz's Pecan Slab Pie
    With a dollop of lightly sweetened, loosely whipped cream.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #2823 - November 27th, 2023, 10:01 am
    Post #2823 - November 27th, 2023, 10:01 am Post #2823 - November 27th, 2023, 10:01 am
    Say you’re from the Midwest without saying you're from the Midwest. Potato, pork chop, asparagus, sautéed mushroom and onion. Hardy start of the cold weather meal.

    click to enlarge
    Image

    Pork chop, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #2824 - November 27th, 2023, 12:52 pm
    Post #2824 - November 27th, 2023, 12:52 pm Post #2824 - November 27th, 2023, 12:52 pm
    last of the thanksgiving leftovers: loaded baked potato soup (repurposing some yukon gold mash) with toppings of scallion, bacon, cheddar, sour cream.
  • Post #2825 - November 27th, 2023, 7:31 pm
    Post #2825 - November 27th, 2023, 7:31 pm Post #2825 - November 27th, 2023, 7:31 pm
    annak wrote:last of the thanksgiving leftovers: loaded baked potato soup (repurposing some yukon gold mash) with toppings of scallion, bacon, cheddar, sour cream.

    Some remnants of Thanksgiving here, too. WFH today and I used what would have been lunchtime to clear out the fridge and make a pot of soup. Got rid of some past-their-prime vegetables and some Thanksgiving leftovers, too . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Kagekiyo Blue #1 Gyuto, 210mm
    Evoo, chopped garlic, yellow onion, salt, russet potato, zucchini, celery, carrot, scallion, 4x gelatinous pork stock, egg noodles, Thanksgiving sausage crumbles, long hot pepper, green cabbage, parsley, chicken stock, red kale and black pepper.

    Had about a quart of leftover chicken/turkey stock from Thanksgiving, as well as some sausage crumbles that didn't make it into our stuffing. And figured that as long as I had a jiggly block of pork stock in the fridge, I might as well toss some of that in there, too. The rest was just getting rid of stuff, and that felt great . . .

    Image
    Plated Up
    Vegetable Noodle Soup with toasted/buttered Jalapeno-Cheddar bread from Loaf Lounge. Sprinkled a little gochugaru in there when no one was looking. ;)

    Happy Monday! :)

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #2826 - November 28th, 2023, 1:48 am
    Post #2826 - November 28th, 2023, 1:48 am Post #2826 - November 28th, 2023, 1:48 am
    Also Thanksgiving leftovers sort of: Alphabet soup made with leftover turkey + veg, bread left from cutting cubes for stuffing. Less ambitious, in a bigger hurry.
  • Post #2827 - November 28th, 2023, 7:42 pm
    Post #2827 - November 28th, 2023, 7:42 pm Post #2827 - November 28th, 2023, 7:42 pm
    Tonight, working out our ideal weeknight turkey burger formulation while trying to get rid of some Japanese eggplant that wasn't awful but had clearly seen better days . . .

    Image
    Eggplant Mise En Place & Kagekiyo Blue #1 Gyuto, 210mm
    Toasted sesame seeds, gochugaru, Japanese eggplant, rice vinegar, toasted sesame oil, red pepper sauce, tupelo honey, garlic (later microplaned) and gouchjang.

    Lightly oiled, then broiled the eggplant planks, cut side up, until they were tender -- about 12 minutes. After that, brushed them with a glaze made from all the other ingredients, and convection-roasted them for another couple of minutes -- until the edges were bubbling.

    Turkey burgers, we now have them just about dialed in for our preference:

    1 pound (454g) 93/7 ground turkey
    1 T dried mushroom powder (we used ground shiitakes and porcinis but any would probably work)
    1 t granulated garlic
    1 t granulated onion
    1/2 t black pepper (basically, to taste)
    1% salt (~4.5g)

    For best results, form into patties and cook them in a frying pan in a mix of evoo and butter.

    I went back and forth on adding the salt but with ground turkey, as I learned via trial and error, -- and unlike with beef burgers -- adding some on the interior really improves the final product. Initially, I was convinced that was the wrong move but I've come to think that not only is it an improvement, it's necessary . . .

    Image
    Plated Up
    Turkey burger, spicy-sweet broiled eggplant and some red onions that were sauteed in the turkey burger pan drippings. The turkesa burgesas (as we sometimes call them around here) will mainly be for my wife's lunches but they made for a nice main dinner course, too.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #2828 - December 2nd, 2023, 12:40 pm
    Post #2828 - December 2nd, 2023, 12:40 pm Post #2828 - December 2nd, 2023, 12:40 pm
    Last night, I cooked lamb shanks in red wine and beef stock. They turned out well although I would cook them 3.5 hours instead of 2.5 hours the next time.

    At the end of the meal, I had about two quarts of the braising fluid which has a good flavor. What I would like to do now that it has been in my refrigerator overnight is to remove the fat, strain out the solids and use the rest to make a soup.

    Anyone do this and will it turn out all right or am I wasting my time??
    Last edited by jlawrence01 on December 2nd, 2023, 1:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #2829 - December 2nd, 2023, 12:50 pm
    Post #2829 - December 2nd, 2023, 12:50 pm Post #2829 - December 2nd, 2023, 12:50 pm
    jlawrence01 wrote:Last night, I cooked lamb shanks in red wine and beef stock. They turned out well although I would cook them 3.5 hours instead of 2.5 hours the next time.

    At the end of the meal, I had about two quarts of the braising fluid which has a good flavor. What I would like to do now that it has been in my refrigerator overnight is to remove the fat, strain out the solids and use the rest to make a soup.

    Anyone do this and wqill it turn out all right or am I wasting my time??


    I’ve used a very similar leftover stock mix from making Instant Pot short ribs—so all beef, not lamb—for French onion soup. It was delicious. Might depend on how much wine you used and how strong it still is but if it tastes like beef stock, there’s no reason you can’t use it for either a beef or lamb soup/stew.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #2830 - December 2nd, 2023, 1:47 pm
    Post #2830 - December 2nd, 2023, 1:47 pm Post #2830 - December 2nd, 2023, 1:47 pm
    We routinely use excess braising liquid in soup and often mix kinds. Beef shanks or shoulder with red wine work well. I usually use some white wine with lamb shanks, which also works well. Unless there is a strong red wine flavor, I don't see any problem. Even if the red wine flavor is strong, mix the stock with some other stock. You will probably get a more complex flavor in the soup.

    Somewhere in the distant past, probably one of the Gourmet cook books, I recall recommending a mix of chicken and beef stock for onion soup.
  • Post #2831 - December 2nd, 2023, 7:32 pm
    Post #2831 - December 2nd, 2023, 7:32 pm Post #2831 - December 2nd, 2023, 7:32 pm
    jlawrence01 wrote:Last night, I cooked lamb shanks in red wine and beef stock. They turned out well although I would cook them 3.5 hours instead of 2.5 hours the next time.

    At the end of the meal, I had about two quarts of the braising fluid which has a good flavor. What I would like to do now that it has been in my refrigerator overnight is to remove the fat, strain out the solids and use the rest to make a soup.

    Anyone do this and will it turn out all right or am I wasting my time??

    Use. Everything. Always. (or at least that's the goal). Braising liquid like that is cooking gold. You can't buy it and can't reproduce it easily, so put it to work in other dishes, for sure. Soup, yeah but so many other uses, too like a gravy or even cooked down a bit and then used to amp up a stir-fry with diluting it, for example.

    Tonight, the return of a pantry/freezer/ cold-weather favorite that I hadn't cooked since April . . .

    Image
    Baked Mini Shells (aka conchigliette)
    I normally do this with rotini but when I went to the pantry, I didn't have any, so I used these chickpea-based mini shells (a sample from somewhere) and they were pretty good.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With sauteed broccolini (evoo, garlic, red pepper flakes, salt, white wine and squeezed lemon). I'd definitely use the chickpea pasta again but I do prefer the larger, more open rotini, as it's more voluminous and I think it picks up the sauce better.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #2832 - December 2nd, 2023, 8:47 pm
    Post #2832 - December 2nd, 2023, 8:47 pm Post #2832 - December 2nd, 2023, 8:47 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:
    jlawrence01 wrote:Last night, I cooked lamb shanks in red wine and beef stock. They turned out well although I would cook them 3.5 hours instead of 2.5 hours the next time.

    At the end of the meal, I had about two quarts of the braising fluid which has a good flavor. What I would like to do now that it has been in my refrigerator overnight is to remove the fat, strain out the solids and use the rest to make a soup.

    Anyone do this and will it turn out all right or am I wasting my time??

    Use. Everything. Always. (or at least that's the goal). Braising liquid like that is cooking gold. You can't buy it and can't reproduce it easily, so put it to work in other dishes, for sure. Soup, yeah but so many other uses, too like a gravy or even cooked down a bit and then used to amp up a stir-fry with diluting it, for example.

    Tonight, the return of a pantry/freezer/ cold-weather favorite that I hadn't cooked since April . . .

    Image
    Baked Mini Shells (aka conchigliette)
    I normally do this with rotini but when I went to the pantry, I didn't have any, so I used these chickpea-based mini shells (a sample from somewhere) and they were pretty good.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With sauteed broccolini (evoo, garlic, red pepper flakes, salt, white wine and squeezed lemon). I'd definitely use the chickpea pasta again but I do prefer the larger, more open rotini, as it's more voluminous and I think it picks up the sauce better.

    =R=

    Photo/ plate composition is perfection Ron. Negative space is always a plus!

    And yes…liquid gold!
    If you aren't tasting, you aren't cooking.
  • Post #2833 - December 2nd, 2023, 9:08 pm
    Post #2833 - December 2nd, 2023, 9:08 pm Post #2833 - December 2nd, 2023, 9:08 pm
    jlawrence01 wrote:Last night, I cooked lamb shanks in red wine and beef stock. They turned out well although I would cook them 3.5 hours instead of 2.5 hours the next time.

    At the end of the meal, I had about two quarts of the braising fluid which has a good flavor. What I would like to do now that it has been in my refrigerator overnight is to remove the fat, strain out the solids and use the rest to make a soup.

    Anyone do this and will it turn out all right or am I wasting my time??


    Do you know the paring knife trick? Insert the knife tip fully into the shank. If removing the knife is easy, it’s done. If there is any resistance at all, it needs more cooking.
    If you aren't tasting, you aren't cooking.
  • Post #2834 - December 2nd, 2023, 9:33 pm
    Post #2834 - December 2nd, 2023, 9:33 pm Post #2834 - December 2nd, 2023, 9:33 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Use. Everything. Always. (or at least that's the goal). Braising liquid like that is cooking gold.

    I sure try. I've got shrimp stock, chicken stock, braising liquid from ropa vieja... I rendered the large chunks of fat from a prime packer brisket a few months ago and just used it in savory pie crust.

    Some years ago I had braised a rabbit. The stock from that made the best soup I've ever had (avgolemono with mushrooms).

    And then a couple days ago I shredded the meat off a roast duck, looked at the carcass and said, "right now I just don't have any place to put more stock." I felt really bad about that.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #2835 - December 2nd, 2023, 9:58 pm
    Post #2835 - December 2nd, 2023, 9:58 pm Post #2835 - December 2nd, 2023, 9:58 pm
    We like the bone in half turkey breasts at Fresh Farms, Joel, and Isave the frames along with deglazing roasting pans. Those remnants came out of the freezer just before Thanksgiving and covered with highly reduced poultry stock which was very dark in color. The next evening we served rib roast, and I used this to deglaze the beef drippings and fat. I was really happy with the results. Perfect jus (IMO).
    If you aren't tasting, you aren't cooking.
  • Post #2836 - December 2nd, 2023, 10:13 pm
    Post #2836 - December 2nd, 2023, 10:13 pm Post #2836 - December 2nd, 2023, 10:13 pm
    Evil Ronnie wrote:
    Do you know the paring knife trick? Insert the knife tip fully into the shank. If removing the knife is easy, it’s done. If there is any resistance at all, it needs more cooking.


    I agree with you completely. However, I put those shanks in as soon as I returned from a medical appointment 40 miles away. I did not want to rush them. I should have cooked them in a crockpot or fired up my new instapot but did not have the time.

    This was my semi-annual lamb dinner. Next time, it will be a boneless New Zealand leg of lamb.
  • Post #2837 - December 2nd, 2023, 10:19 pm
    Post #2837 - December 2nd, 2023, 10:19 pm Post #2837 - December 2nd, 2023, 10:19 pm
    jlawrence01 wrote:
    Evil Ronnie wrote:
    Do you know the paring knife trick? Insert the knife tip fully into the shank. If removing the knife is easy, it’s done. If there is any resistance at all, it needs more cooking.


    I agree with you completely. However, I put those shanks in as soon as I returned from a medical appointment 40 miles away. I did not want to rush them. I should have cooked them in a crockpot or fired up my new instapot but did not have the time.

    This was my semi-annual lamb dinner. Next time, it will be a boneless New Zealand leg of lamb.

    Freeze your jus and adjust it to sauce consistency for your lamb leg!
    If you aren't tasting, you aren't cooking.
  • Post #2838 - December 3rd, 2023, 4:37 pm
    Post #2838 - December 3rd, 2023, 4:37 pm Post #2838 - December 3rd, 2023, 4:37 pm
    I've tried pressure cooking lamb in the past and wasn't real pleased. Tender, yes, and faster, but it seemed like the pressure pushed more of the gamey flavor deep into the meat. Just my experience but perhaps try a small cut before risking a leg.
  • Post #2839 - December 3rd, 2023, 6:55 pm
    Post #2839 - December 3rd, 2023, 6:55 pm Post #2839 - December 3rd, 2023, 6:55 pm
    Dug the second half of a ribless roast from Costco out of the freezer and decided to serve it up with, among other things, some wine & stock simmered mushroom sauce . . .

    Image
    Mushroom Mise En Place & Kagekiyo Blue #1 Gyuto, 210mm
    4x gelatinous pork stock, sliced garlic, unsalted butter, whole/washed/trimmed cremini mushrooms, black pepper, red wine, evoo, salt and shallots. While this was simmering away and reducing, the roast was also doing its thing. Baked at 200F until it reached 125F internal and then a quick blast at the end (450F convection roast) to crisp up the exterior . . .

    Image
    Low & Slow Ribless Roast
    Cut on the board and moved to the platter.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Ribless roast and mushroom sauce with some leftover/reheated stuffing and an arugula & mini tomato salad.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #2840 - December 3rd, 2023, 7:31 pm
    Post #2840 - December 3rd, 2023, 7:31 pm Post #2840 - December 3rd, 2023, 7:31 pm
    busy busy weekend including a lot of cooking, and running around today, so tonight was a first: those newish david chang packaged ramens (available at whole foods and target and online in the momofuku food store with the chili crisp, salts, etc).

    doctored with some fresh haricots and fresh scallion (they come with impressive flash dried scallion), and beaten egg, they were pretty good! quite nice chew. if you find yourself in a dinner emergency looking for an inexpensive shelf-stable solution, you could do much worse. he has a bunch of youtube videos for doctoring them further too.
  • Post #2841 - December 4th, 2023, 3:17 pm
    Post #2841 - December 4th, 2023, 3:17 pm Post #2841 - December 4th, 2023, 3:17 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Low & Slow Ribless Roast
    Cut on the board and moved to the platter.
    Impressive roast.
  • Post #2842 - December 4th, 2023, 10:25 pm
    Post #2842 - December 4th, 2023, 10:25 pm Post #2842 - December 4th, 2023, 10:25 pm
    ekreider wrote:We routinely use excess braising liquid in soup and often mix kinds. Beef shanks or shoulder with red wine work well. I usually use some white wine with lamb shanks, which also works well. Unless there is a strong red wine flavor, I don't see any problem. Even if the red wine flavor is strong, mix the stock with some other stock. You will probably get a more complex flavor in the soup.


    Actually, I was a cup of red wine short on the lamb so I increased the amount of beef stock. The wine taste was present but not overwhelming. I skimmed the fat off of the braising liquid.

    I cut up a small chuck roast and browned it off. I added carrots, celery and onions. Then I added chopped tomatoes, sliced okra, and a couple of cups of napa cabbage. It turned out really good. I gave a quart of the soup to two of my neighbors.
  • Post #2843 - December 4th, 2023, 10:45 pm
    Post #2843 - December 4th, 2023, 10:45 pm Post #2843 - December 4th, 2023, 10:45 pm
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Dug the second half of a ribless roast from Costco out of the freezer and decided to serve it up with, among other things, some wine & stock simmered mushroom sauce . . .

    Image
    Mushroom Mise En Place & Kagekiyo Blue #1 Gyuto, 210mm
    4x gelatinous pork stock, sliced garlic, unsalted butter, whole/washed/trimmed cremini mushrooms, black pepper, red wine, evoo, salt and shallots. While this was simmering away and reducing, the roast was also doing its thing. Baked at 200F until it reached 125F internal and then a quick blast at the end (450F convection roast) to crisp up the exterior . . .

    Image
    Low & Slow Ribless Roast
    Cut on the board and moved to the platter.

    Image
    Plated Up
    Ribless roast and mushroom sauce with some leftover/reheated stuffing and an arugula & mini tomato salad.

    =R=

    Hi,
    Call it whatever you want, but you roasted a beef rib, ribeye roll, lip off, specifically a NAMP #112, and it looks beautiful.
    Evil Ronnie
    If you aren't tasting, you aren't cooking.
  • Post #2844 - December 6th, 2023, 7:42 pm
    Post #2844 - December 6th, 2023, 7:42 pm Post #2844 - December 6th, 2023, 7:42 pm
    My work days have been typically long this time of year and I've been spending less time in the kitchen but after too many non-cooking days lately, I felt like I had to cook something today, so a quickie, after-work stir-fry . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Konosuke Sumiiro SLD Gyuto, 210mm
    Baking soda, minced garlic, broccoli florets, granulated sugar, corn starch, soy sauce, dark soy sauce, u26-30 peeled/de-veined shrimp, oyster sauce, black pepper, sliced ginger root, seeded, dried red chiles, Shaoxing cooking wine and avocado oil.

    I've had Sumiiro on the brain lately. My friend bought a 150mm Sumiiro petty about which he cannot stop raving. I love how much he loves it. Then, another chum shared an interesting note about the smith, Nihei, who forged the Sumiiros. All this Sumiiro talk had me thinking that it'd been way too long since I broke mine out. A lovely knife and quite the looker, too.

    As for the stir-fry, it was a fairly standard affair, with the liquids (along with a little water), sugar, baking soda, corn starch and black pepper forming a marinade. The shrimp go in for about 30 minutes, after which everything goes into (and out of) the wok in a sensible order. After about 10 minutes of actual cooking, it's all ready to go . . .

    Image
    Plated Up
    With some freshly machined jasmine rice. Quick, easy and quite tasty.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #2845 - December 8th, 2023, 7:34 pm
    Post #2845 - December 8th, 2023, 7:34 pm Post #2845 - December 8th, 2023, 7:34 pm
    I guess it's official. We're on a soup kick . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Tim 'Timos' Johnson 26C3 Swedish Steel Gyuto, 210mm
    Cabbage, carrot, salt, minced garlic, okra, chicken stock (homemade, roasted necks & feet), kale, celery, parsley, orzo, long hot pepper, cremini mushrooms, zucchini, 4x gelatinous pork stock, black pepper, yellow onion and evoo.

    As the soup cooked, I decided that some additional protein was needed, so I grabbed a pound of 93/7 ground turkey out of the fridge . . .

    Image
    Turkey Meatballs
    Par-fried these separately in a mix of evoo and unsalted butter, and tossed them into the pot at the end. Followed my basic turkey burger recipe (salt, pepper, granulated garlic & onion, dried/powdered mushrooms) and added some panko, an egg and a splash of milk.

    After some simmer time, it all came together . . .

    Image
    Plated Up
    With some toasted/buttered Caramelized Onion bread from Loaf Lounge.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #2846 - December 9th, 2023, 10:15 pm
    Post #2846 - December 9th, 2023, 10:15 pm Post #2846 - December 9th, 2023, 10:15 pm
    Snow crab, snow crab and more snow crab. Plus green salad, boiled tiny potatoes, and wax beans from Montrose Market.
  • Post #2847 - December 10th, 2023, 8:27 pm
    Post #2847 - December 10th, 2023, 8:27 pm Post #2847 - December 10th, 2023, 8:27 pm
    Actually started the cooking day at brunch, by putting to use the end of a dinner I made last week, the ribless roast from Costco . . .

    Image
    Ribless Roast Beast Hash
    Potatoes, onions herbs and a trio of sunny side-up eggs.

    Later on, some dinner prep with my fun new addition . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Tim 'Timos' Johnson 26C3 Swedish Steel Gyuto, 210mm
    White wine, minced garlic, celery, carrot, bay leaves, black pepper, RG lentils, evoo, parsley, 4x gelatinous pork stock salt and yellow onion. Love getting that lip-smacking quality -- and flavor boost -- via the addition of the pork stock.

    And back to one on the protein . . .
    Image
    Charcoal-Grilled Chicken Thighs
    That little LED desk lamp comes in very handy this time of year.

    Image
    Plated Up
    With a blob of the weekly slaw.

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #2848 - December 11th, 2023, 10:51 am
    Post #2848 - December 11th, 2023, 10:51 am Post #2848 - December 11th, 2023, 10:51 am
    Mussels with garlic, fresh fennel, onion and Rosé

    click to enlarge
    Image

    Mussels, count me a Fan!
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #2849 - December 11th, 2023, 6:40 pm
    Post #2849 - December 11th, 2023, 6:40 pm Post #2849 - December 11th, 2023, 6:40 pm
    Got inspired by this recent youtube video, especially when I remembered I had a nice hunk of artisanal guanciale in the basement fridge . . .


    I Learned The Most Authentic Pasta Amatriciana from an Italian Mamma

    Decided to give it a whirl . . .

    Image
    Mise En Place & Tim 'Timos' Johnson 26C3 Swedish Steel Gyuto, 210mm
    White wine (just in case I'd need it for deglazing after rendering the guanciale -- I didn't), crushed San Marzano tomatoes, guanciale, bucatini, red pepper flakes and pecorino romano.

    Image
    Rendered Guanciale
    Crispy on the outside but still tender and chewy beneath the exterior. Also saved the rendered fat for the building of the sauce/dish. There was a lot of it and I needed just a tiny portion of it to get things going. With the linked video above, there's no reason to chart out the process at all. It's quick and very straightforward.

    Image
    Bucatini Alla Matriciana
    The family loved this. Me, I thought it was fine but slightly less than the sum of its parts. Not saying it was bad -- and whatever shortcomings I encountered were likely a consequence of user error on my part -- but it didn't rock my world. For me, less is almost always more but in this case, not so much.

    Happy Monday! :)

    =R=
    Same planet, different world
  • Post #2850 - December 13th, 2023, 7:15 pm
    Post #2850 - December 13th, 2023, 7:15 pm Post #2850 - December 13th, 2023, 7:15 pm
    tonight we tried the recent recipe in Bon Appetit for Sheet Pan Spinach Lasagna. we omitted the pork for a lighter route as it seemed it would be rich enough - and it was! much enjoyed by all, a surprising set of techniques.

    https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/sheet ... ch-lasagna

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