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  • Post #361 - November 9th, 2023, 10:45 am
    Post #361 - November 9th, 2023, 10:45 am Post #361 - November 9th, 2023, 10:45 am
    polster wrote:I was at the Whole Foods in Northbrook and noticed in the condiment aisle they had a new ketchup (3 varieties) from RAO's
    First line extension from new owner Campbell's?
  • Post #362 - November 9th, 2023, 10:54 am
    Post #362 - November 9th, 2023, 10:54 am Post #362 - November 9th, 2023, 10:54 am
    tjr wrote:
    polster wrote:I was at the Whole Foods in Northbrook and noticed in the condiment aisle they had a new ketchup (3 varieties) from RAO's
    First line extension from new owner Campbell's?


    That would be some impressive turnaround. Don't think they can react that quickly.
  • Post #363 - November 9th, 2023, 12:00 pm
    Post #363 - November 9th, 2023, 12:00 pm Post #363 - November 9th, 2023, 12:00 pm
    spinynorman99 wrote:
    tjr wrote:
    polster wrote:I was at the Whole Foods in Northbrook and noticed in the condiment aisle they had a new ketchup (3 varieties) from RAO's
    First line extension from new owner Campbell's?


    That would be some impressive turnaround. Don't think they can react that quickly.


    I think this was already planned as I've seen the Frozen Pizza line which is fairly new offering from RAO's. This new ketchup is just an extension of their new product offerings they are pushing into the market.
  • Post #364 - November 9th, 2023, 1:34 pm
    Post #364 - November 9th, 2023, 1:34 pm Post #364 - November 9th, 2023, 1:34 pm
    Their frozen pizza came out last year but has been slow to roll out.
  • Post #365 - November 18th, 2023, 10:04 am
    Post #365 - November 18th, 2023, 10:04 am Post #365 - November 18th, 2023, 10:04 am
    I was at the Jewel in Skokie by Old Orchard and I saw this item as part of promo items for the Thanksgiving holiday next to the turkeys. I have never seen a Himalayan Rock Salt Brine Egg before which I assume is just 100% salt to add flavor to the meat from inside.
    Saltean’s Himalayan Rock Salt Brine Egg is made with the purpose of flavoring and tenderizing your poultry and turkey inside out. It is 100% natural and made with pure Himalayan salt to give your meat a delicate flavor and saltiness

    https://www.saltean.com/brine-egg/himal ... 0saltiness.

    Image
  • Post #366 - December 2nd, 2023, 8:28 am
    Post #366 - December 2nd, 2023, 8:28 am Post #366 - December 2nd, 2023, 8:28 am
    Looking for a sweetish snack yesterday and not overly fussy about price, I came upon Image
    It's essentially just the good (read expensive) stuff from granola. Good snack as is, and would be good in oatmeal or monster cookies. Or I might toast a bunch of oats and barley flakes and make granola with it - a good compromise for cheaper fresher granola without having to buy all the little bits that make it tasty.

    I had no idea grain-free granola was a thing! GFG, count me a fan!
  • Post #367 - December 2nd, 2023, 1:36 pm
    Post #367 - December 2nd, 2023, 1:36 pm Post #367 - December 2nd, 2023, 1:36 pm
    tjr wrote:I had no idea grain-free granola was a thing! GFG, count me a fan!


    Thank all the people on Keto diets. Even the warehouse clubs have grain-free granola now.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #368 - December 2nd, 2023, 5:42 pm
    Post #368 - December 2nd, 2023, 5:42 pm Post #368 - December 2nd, 2023, 5:42 pm
    Recent find: Crispy Fried Calamari at Costco. It's in a really pouch, not needing refrigeration.

    I was expecting, given the name, something like French's Fried Onions with a squid flavor. Unfortunately, it's pretty leathery, and a bit fishy.

    Heated in the toaster oven, they're a little less leathery, but added the fishy smell to the room.

    I can't say I hate them, they're ok as a ramen addition, but not when I'm expecting company to call.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #369 - December 9th, 2023, 1:41 pm
    Post #369 - December 9th, 2023, 1:41 pm Post #369 - December 9th, 2023, 1:41 pm
    Many long years ago, there was a lovely little boutique shop in an unincorporated area on the North Shore that was known as No Man's Land. It was called The Amber Light. While this shop sold many exquisite gifts and art objects, the thing that drew me back there was the handmade, caramel-coated marshmallows. They were sold individually, but one was really all you ever needed. And then the store was gone, and I never saw these delights again -- until Thursday night. Smassey's contribution to the gift exchange included caramel-covered marshmallows, but this time, they had a name -- Modjeskas -- and a source -- Louisville, KY. I figured it they had a name, they would have a history--and here it is. They are indigenous to Louisville, were first created in 1883, and were named for a visiting European actress. Here's the article I found, if you want more background, as well as a recipe. https://mycountrytable.com/modjeskas/

    But having something that has an associated story is like a double gift. Thanks for the taste of Louisville, Smassey.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #370 - December 9th, 2023, 10:05 pm
    Post #370 - December 9th, 2023, 10:05 pm Post #370 - December 9th, 2023, 10:05 pm
    Cynthia wrote:Many long years ago, there was a lovely little boutique shop in an unincorporated area on the North Shore that was known as No Man's Land.
    In case this roused your curiosity as much as it did mine, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_Man%27s_Land,_Illinois
  • Post #371 - December 10th, 2023, 12:16 am
    Post #371 - December 10th, 2023, 12:16 am Post #371 - December 10th, 2023, 12:16 am
    tjr wrote:
    Cynthia wrote:Many long years ago, there was a lovely little boutique shop in an unincorporated area on the North Shore that was known as No Man's Land.
    In case this roused your curiosity as much as it did mine, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_Man%27s_Land,_Illinois


    Well, seems as though I missed it's rougher period. When I was a youngster, it consisted of the glorious Teatro del Lago, where I saw and heard my first Wurlitzer theater organ and saw "A Hard Day's Night," the San Pedro Restaurant, and, across the street, on the beach side of the street, Dairy Bar, an ice cream shop that sold Peacock's premium ice cream. A handful of shops looped around the parking lot. But then, yes, in the '60s, it began to grow. I believe it is where the first Crate and Barrel opened. Then hotels went up, walling in the beach view, and they tore town the wonderful old Teatro and the Dairy Bar. One remaining marker, at least last time I was in that area, was a couple of plinths with stone lions atop them, marked the "doorways" to No Man's Land. They did manage to keep a bit of the charm of that original "Spanish" period.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #372 - December 10th, 2023, 12:28 am
    Post #372 - December 10th, 2023, 12:28 am Post #372 - December 10th, 2023, 12:28 am
    As a kid, we used to go to Teatro del Lago frequently — I remember seeing "It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World" there. Not to start a dispute with the highly learned Ms. Clampitt, but I'm pretty sure the first Crate & Barrel was in Old Town (where I moved after college).
  • Post #373 - December 10th, 2023, 5:05 am
    Post #373 - December 10th, 2023, 5:05 am Post #373 - December 10th, 2023, 5:05 am
    Cynthia wrote:Many long years ago, there was a lovely little boutique shop in an unincorporated area on the North Shore that was known as No Man's Land. It was called The Amber Light. While this shop sold many exquisite gifts and art objects, the thing that drew me back there was the handmade, caramel-coated marshmallows. They were sold individually, but one was really all you ever needed. And then the store was gone, and I never saw these delights again -- until Thursday night. Smassey's contribution to the gift exchange included caramel-covered marshmallows, but this time, they had a name -- Modjeskas -- and a source -- Louisville, KY. I figured it they had a name, they would have a history--and here it is. They are indigenous to Louisville, were first created in 1883, and were named for a visiting European actress. Here's the article I found, if you want more background, as well as a recipe. https://mycountrytable.com/modjeskas/

    But having something that has an associated story is like a double gift. Thanks for the taste of Louisville, Smassey.

    Cynthia, Thank you for your post and message. It was nice to meet you, and I am glad you enjoyed the treats. In Louisville, we know this confection as Bauer's Modjeska's. I just learned that they originally referred to it as a "caramel biscuit". Here is the link to Bauer's Candies, which was my ordering source.: https://bauerscandy.com/

    Modjeskas are also made at Muth's Candies, which has been around for over 100 years and has a bricks & mortar location in what is now known as the NuLu neighborhood of Louisville: https://muthscandy.com/

    Here is an article that speaks a little more about the history of the confection and shares an opinion about the two candy makers: https://zeldaandscout.com/2017/06/20/a- ... -modjeska/

    And finally, if you have any interest in the history of the included pottery, it was from Stoneware & Co., which recently rebranded from "Louisville Stoneware". Here is a link, with some more history: https://www.stonewareandco.com/heritage/. There is a factory store in Louisville and we often make a stop on trips home. In my upbringing, it seemed that most families had either some Louisville Stoneware or Hadley Pottery, often personalized children's plates or pet bowls or holiday decor, so for the sake of fairness: https://hadleypottery.com/
  • Post #374 - December 10th, 2023, 12:22 pm
    Post #374 - December 10th, 2023, 12:22 pm Post #374 - December 10th, 2023, 12:22 pm
    Thanks for the additional history, Smassey. That sort of information always makes things more special.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #375 - January 12th, 2024, 11:55 pm
    Post #375 - January 12th, 2024, 11:55 pm Post #375 - January 12th, 2024, 11:55 pm
    I was at Jewel the other day and I saw an apple variety that at least is new to me called "Lemonade Apple". The Lemonade Apple is on sale this week for $0.99 / LB.

    Image

    https://www.jewelosco.com/shop/product- ... 53157.html

    What is a Lemonade apple?
    Lemonade is a new variety of yellow skinned apple from New Zealand. As the name suggests, it has a slight lemon flavour and a more tangy, light eating experience. There is a good level of sweetness, and the flesh is firm and crunchy with quite a solid bite.
  • Post #376 - January 13th, 2024, 3:44 pm
    Post #376 - January 13th, 2024, 3:44 pm Post #376 - January 13th, 2024, 3:44 pm
    polster wrote:I was at Jewel the other day and I saw an apple variety that at least is new to me called "Lemonade Apple

    Been eating a lot of apples lately. Mostly of the firm crisp tart with a hint of sweet category. Lemonade apple seemed right in my wheelhouse so I bought some. Enjoyed them immensely. Will buy again. Thanks for the heads up.
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #377 - January 13th, 2024, 4:03 pm
    Post #377 - January 13th, 2024, 4:03 pm Post #377 - January 13th, 2024, 4:03 pm
    G Wiv wrote:
    polster wrote:I was at Jewel the other day and I saw an apple variety that at least is new to me called "Lemonade Apple

    Been eating a lot of apples lately. Mostly of the firm crisp tart with a hint of sweet category. Lemonade apple seemed right in my wheelhouse so I bought some. Enjoyed them immensely. Will buy again. Thanks for the heads up.


    Haven’t seen these at Strack’s or the Schererville Whole Foods—may have to hit a Jewel in the city since this sounds like something my husband would love.
    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad." Miles Kington
  • Post #378 - February 21st, 2024, 9:03 pm
    Post #378 - February 21st, 2024, 9:03 pm Post #378 - February 21st, 2024, 9:03 pm
    BRANZA DE BURDUF

    Image

    I have a Romanian cookbook that I've been perusing for awhile. Finally decided to make something from it and needed this cheese. Thought it was a long shot to find and had already Googled substitutes. Happily surprised after about 10 minutes of searching to find it at Fresh Farms.

    What a delightful cheese. Similar in flavor and texture to feta, but way more intensely flavored. Also, my recipe instructed to add it to hot polenta and it melted in perfectly, more easily then feta would have.

    I will definately purchase this cheese again.
  • Post #379 - February 21st, 2024, 9:36 pm
    Post #379 - February 21st, 2024, 9:36 pm Post #379 - February 21st, 2024, 9:36 pm
    LynnB wrote:BRANZA DE BURDUF

    I have a Romanian cookbook that I've been perusing for awhile. Finally decided to make something from it and needed this cheese. Thought it was a long shot to find and had already Googled substitutes. Happily surprised after about 10 minutes of searching to find it at Fresh Farms.

    What a delightful cheese. Similar in flavor and texture to feta, but way more intensely flavored. Also, my recipe instructed to add it to hot polenta and it melted in perfectly, more easily then feta would have.

    I will definately purchase this cheese again.

    Goat? Cow? Sheep? Looks tasty. Most likely cow because it's yellow.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #380 - February 22nd, 2024, 4:57 am
    Post #380 - February 22nd, 2024, 4:57 am Post #380 - February 22nd, 2024, 4:57 am
    JoelF wrote:
    LynnB wrote:BRANZA DE BURDUF

    I have a Romanian cookbook that I've been perusing for awhile. Finally decided to make something from it and needed this cheese. Thought it was a long shot to find and had already Googled substitutes. Happily surprised after about 10 minutes of searching to find it at Fresh Farms.

    What a delightful cheese. Similar in flavor and texture to feta, but way more intensely flavored. Also, my recipe instructed to add it to hot polenta and it melted in perfectly, more easily then feta would have.

    I will definately purchase this cheese again.

    Goat? Cow? Sheep? Looks tasty. Most likely cow because it's yellow.


    Sheep
  • Post #381 - February 25th, 2024, 12:51 pm
    Post #381 - February 25th, 2024, 12:51 pm Post #381 - February 25th, 2024, 12:51 pm
    I recently wrote an article about afternoon tea, and the article elicited a response from someone who actually keeps a website about afternoon tea -- a listing by state of every place in the United States that serves afternoon tea.

    So if this is something you enjoy, you now have a resource for finding a nice tea wherever in the U.S. you go.
    https://destinationtea.com/teavenues/
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #382 - February 25th, 2024, 2:24 pm
    Post #382 - February 25th, 2024, 2:24 pm Post #382 - February 25th, 2024, 2:24 pm
    Cynthia wrote:I recently wrote an article about afternoon tea, and the article elicited a response from someone who actually keeps a website about afternoon tea -- a listing by state of every place in the United States that serves afternoon tea.

    So if this is something you enjoy, you now have a resource for finding a nice tea wherever in the U.S. you go.
    https://destinationtea.com/teavenues/


    Very cool!
  • Post #383 - February 25th, 2024, 4:38 pm
    Post #383 - February 25th, 2024, 4:38 pm Post #383 - February 25th, 2024, 4:38 pm
    LynnB wrote:BRANZA DE BURDUF

    Image

    I have a Romanian cookbook that I've been perusing for awhile. Finally decided to make something from it and needed this cheese. Thought it was a long shot to find and had already Googled substitutes. Happily surprised after about 10 minutes of searching to find it at Fresh Farms.

    What a delightful cheese. Similar in flavor and texture to feta, but way more intensely flavored. Also, my recipe instructed to add it to hot polenta and it melted in perfectly, more easily then feta would have.

    I will definately purchase this cheese again.

    I went looking for this at the Touhy Fresh farms. I saw two possibilities that might've been the cheese you bought, lynn. was it a long skinny tube, or was it a shorter fatter tube that you purchased? The shorter one look like it was completely different texture from the longer one. thanks
  • Post #384 - March 25th, 2024, 11:35 am
    Post #384 - March 25th, 2024, 11:35 am Post #384 - March 25th, 2024, 11:35 am
    Jerry's Fruit and Garden had bags of Lay's flavored chips from India in the outdoor dumping ground. At 99¢ for individual serving bags, not a great deal, but here's the interesting part: The ingredient lists had the usual "natural flavors" etc but included at the bottom asterisked notes: onion and garlic or garlic. I assume that's for Swaminarayan followers, but I wish they'd do that for US products!
  • Post #385 - April 12th, 2024, 8:58 am
    Post #385 - April 12th, 2024, 8:58 am Post #385 - April 12th, 2024, 8:58 am
    Not today's, but I'm working my way through the package slowly: At Woodman's they had Jimmy Dean's "Toaster Pop-Ups" with egg, cheese and sausage on sale and I thought I'd try them.
    The packaging is extremely deceptive: They look like they fill a toaster slot, sticking up significantly, possibly bigger than a Pop-Tart, but they're a little smaller than a square of American cheese. While thicker than a Pop-Tart, the filling is minimal (making them rather Pop-Tart-like). Because they're frozen, they recommend two toastings at level 4 (of 10). My toaster oven has done a better job with that than the toaster, but it's still a pretty disappointing little pastry, having none of the satisfying richness of similar croissant or biscuit breakfast sandwiches.

    230kcal seemed like an OK-sized breakfast (although Jimmy Dean's similar biscuit is 410, croissant 400, a pair of Pop-Tarts is 340-400), but it really doesn't feel filling.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #386 - May 8th, 2024, 8:52 am
    Post #386 - May 8th, 2024, 8:52 am Post #386 - May 8th, 2024, 8:52 am
    Perhaps I'm the only one who didn't know this: I found a better technique for roasting peppers. I finished fire roasting some poblanos one night and put them in a covered glass bowl to steam. Had to leave, so I tucked the bowl in the fridge and left them until morning. Once really cold, the blackened skins came off much more easily than what I usually experience by just cooling them enough to safely handle. I've since tried this method several more times - even works well on those hard-to-peel yellow and orange supermarket bell peppers.
  • Post #387 - May 19th, 2024, 5:28 pm
    Post #387 - May 19th, 2024, 5:28 pm Post #387 - May 19th, 2024, 5:28 pm
    Stopped at Pirosmani (Georgian deli in Wheeling) to pick up some pkhali (described as "salad balls" -- chopped walnuts, vegetables, garlic, formed into a ball and topped with a pomegranate seed), and discovered that there is now a new Georgian restaurant next door -- Stumara. No website yet, but address is 847 W Dundee Rd, Wheeling, IL 60090. Food from the same kitchen serves both venues -- deli and restaurant.
    "All great change in America begins at the dinner table." Ronald Reagan

    http://midwestmaize.wordpress.com
  • Post #388 - June 11th, 2024, 3:38 pm
    Post #388 - June 11th, 2024, 3:38 pm Post #388 - June 11th, 2024, 3:38 pm
    Not really today's, some months ago, Fresh Farms had an endcap of half-off roasted eggplant, 32oz jar, Ziyad brand. It's been sitting in my pantry for some time, just crossing the "best by" date. Having an event to go to, and making another dip, I decided to try it for one of Ottolenghi's versions (p220 of Jerusalem, a prep for fish kabobs). Opening the jar, I was expecting the eggplant to be dull and flavorless but there's a big smoky char flavor. It's something I'd buy again, on sale (I think the jars are normally like $6-7).

    About 2/3 of the jar, 3 tbs whole-milk yogurt, 3T minced cilantro, 1 big clove garlic microplaned, and to replace the pickled lemons: juice of half a lemon, dash each of turmeric and cumin, big pinch of my favorite sun-dried powdered chili. I added a big pinch of smoked paprika, S&P to taste.
    What is patriotism, but the love of good things we ate in our childhood?
    -- Lin Yutang
  • Post #389 - July 15th, 2024, 10:24 am
    Post #389 - July 15th, 2024, 10:24 am Post #389 - July 15th, 2024, 10:24 am
    Traditional blue box Jiffy corn muffins were 4/$1 at Tony's this week. A simple "recipe": I substituted a well-mashed banana for the milk. The results weren't particularly banana-y but were much moister and higher-crowned than usual. Plus a tiny bit more fruits in the diet!
  • Post #390 - July 15th, 2024, 11:52 am
    Post #390 - July 15th, 2024, 11:52 am Post #390 - July 15th, 2024, 11:52 am
    JoelF wrote:Not really today's, some months ago, Fresh Farms had an endcap of half-off roasted eggplant, 32oz jar, Ziyad brand.


    They had jars for $2.99 yesterday. I believe it was Sera. My go-to for a quick baba ghannouj.

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