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  • Your Favorite Pizza

    Post #1 - February 9th, 2006, 8:40 am
    Post #1 - February 9th, 2006, 8:40 am Post #1 - February 9th, 2006, 8:40 am
    This Saturday is pizza night and my goal is to find something really good, but also something we've never tried.

    I'd prefer either a thin crust or pan pizza, not deep dish or stuffed.

    Here are the places I've already tried: Giordano's, Eduardo's, Gino's, Connie's, Bricks, Chicago's, Lou Malnati's, Chicago Pizza and Oven Grinder Co., Tomato Head, Pizza Capri, Ranalli's, California Pizza Kitchen, My Pie, Rosati's, Pompeii, Uno's, and O'Fame.

    I'm open to all suggestions, but would love a recommendation for a sit down place where we can enjoy our pizza in house, rather than take out/delivery.

    We're just looking for a straight up pie, nothing fancy (i.e. crazy topping combinations or gourmet type presentation), with a tasty sauce and good crust.

    TIA!
  • Post #2 - February 9th, 2006, 8:54 am
    Post #2 - February 9th, 2006, 8:54 am Post #2 - February 9th, 2006, 8:54 am
    Pat's Pizza in Lakeview. Best thin crust pizza in the city, in my opinion. Very thin and crispy. Good sit-down area.

    Pat's Pizza
    2679 N. Lincoln Ave.
    773-248-0168
    Last edited by rdstoll on February 9th, 2006, 12:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #3 - February 9th, 2006, 9:16 am
    Post #3 - February 9th, 2006, 9:16 am Post #3 - February 9th, 2006, 9:16 am
    Carlywood,

    There are a lot of directions that an answer to your question can take. My own personal tastes will point you to a few other threads.

    I would personally direct you to a lot of the places that are well-regarded by many here:

    Candlelite and Marie's were both tasted in the first Thin-Crust-A-Thon, among other good places like Caponie's. (A second a-thon should be in the works soon).

    Other well-regarded restaurants include Vito and Nick's, John's, and Pete's.

    I recently tried Pat's on Lincoln and I enjoyed it, but I was a little put off by its manufactured "Look at me! I'm an Italian restaurant"-atmosphere.

    Didn't the Pat's on Sheffield move here?:
    Pat's Pizza
    2679 N. Lincoln Ave.
    773-248-0168

    Also, it's important to note that there are many detractors on LTHForum of this style of pizza, but judging by all the places you've been, I think you'd enjoy many of the places mentioned in these threads.

    Best,
    Michael
  • Post #4 - February 9th, 2006, 9:25 am
    Post #4 - February 9th, 2006, 9:25 am Post #4 - February 9th, 2006, 9:25 am
    eatchicago wrote:
    Didn't the Pat's on Sheffield move here?:
    Pat's Pizza
    2679 N. Lincoln Ave.
    773-248-0168

    Best,
    Michael


    Yes, Pat's hasn't been at the Sheffield location for a long time.
    Objects in mirror appear to be losing.
  • Post #5 - February 9th, 2006, 9:32 am
    Post #5 - February 9th, 2006, 9:32 am Post #5 - February 9th, 2006, 9:32 am
    The new Pat's is nicer than the old Pat's. I trust the food is the same and the pizza is just as good. Didn't have that much experience with the old Pat's. I do know that the "atmosphere" (remember when people used that word to describe restaurants?) is more upscale and more inviting in the new location than at the old, at what I believe are pretty much the same prices. We've gone back a few times to the new location; once was enough for us at the old one.

    For deep dish, my far and away favorite is Pequod's.
  • Post #6 - February 9th, 2006, 9:37 am
    Post #6 - February 9th, 2006, 9:37 am Post #6 - February 9th, 2006, 9:37 am
    For thin crust, I absolutely love the New Haven-style pies at Piece . . . especially the "white" pies w/ olive oil & garlic, but they also make pizzas "red" (i.e., w/ sauce). You can sit down there and although it can get loud, you can request one of the booths, which are off to the side and tend to be quieter.

    The line between deep dish and pan is so fuzzy, and I would have recommended O'Fame had you not mentioned it. I think their pan pizza is fantastic.
  • Post #7 - February 9th, 2006, 10:11 am
    Post #7 - February 9th, 2006, 10:11 am Post #7 - February 9th, 2006, 10:11 am
    The line between deep dish and pan is so fuzzy...

    Revealing my ignorance here--but what the hell. What is the difference between deep dish and pan?
  • Post #8 - February 9th, 2006, 10:16 am
    Post #8 - February 9th, 2006, 10:16 am Post #8 - February 9th, 2006, 10:16 am
    I'm not sure there is a difference between deep dish and pan. Rather, I would say pan is a type of deep dish. Or "thick."

    The difference, to me, is between pan and stuffed. Pan is like foccacia-- it's a thick, bready base. It's basically the same toppings as a thin pizza, just the crust is taller and breadlike, not cracker-like. Pequod's is like this.

    Stuffed has a thin crust, but then the toppings and cheese are piled much higher than in either a thin or a pan pizza, and baked in a pan (I know, I know) with a higher edge and sometimes a second crust on top. If you're biting into an inch of cheese with ingredients strewn somewhere in the middle, that's a stuffed pizza.

    Now, that's how I would define the difference-- but I don't doubt that the words are all used interchangeably by different restaurants and different folks.
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  • Post #9 - February 9th, 2006, 10:31 am
    Post #9 - February 9th, 2006, 10:31 am Post #9 - February 9th, 2006, 10:31 am
    riddlemay wrote:
    The line between deep dish and pan is so fuzzy...

    Revealing my ignorance here--but what the hell. What is the difference between deep dish and pan?

    There is not necessarily a difference so maybe I should not have said that there is absolutely a distinction between the two. But there is certainly a distinction between the "pan pizza" served at O'Fame (which has a thicker crust all around but no portion of the pizza rises above any other portion), and the deep dish served at Pizano's, Malnati's, Uno/Due's and Gino's (which is thicker really only on the sides and rises above the rest of the pizza). I have often heard the type of pan pizza served at O'Fame referred to as "Sicillian-style." Beyond that, I don't want to be the person to start the fight over the proper classifications of all of these different type pizzas. :)
  • Post #10 - February 9th, 2006, 10:36 am
    Post #10 - February 9th, 2006, 10:36 am Post #10 - February 9th, 2006, 10:36 am
    I consider deep dish to mean stuffed without the top layer of crust, and pan to mean thick-crust. The composition of the pie is totally different, with a different crust, often a different sauce, and a different order to the toppings (most notably sauce on the top with deep dish).

    But remember, I'm a chicagoan born and bred, so deep dish is specifically chicago deep dish.
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #11 - February 9th, 2006, 11:22 am
    Post #11 - February 9th, 2006, 11:22 am Post #11 - February 9th, 2006, 11:22 am
    I'd tend to agree with Mike G here, except in reverse. I think "deep dish" is a thicker style of "pan". It's a pan pizza in a thicker format. If you put a Lou's pizza (which they call "pan") next to a Giordano's pizza, you'll see a difference in thickness or "depth", particularly in the cheese.

    I remember reading something on the wall at My Pie on Damen that broke down each of these particular styles: thin-pan-deep-stuffed.

    Best,
    Michael
  • Post #12 - February 9th, 2006, 11:48 am
    Post #12 - February 9th, 2006, 11:48 am Post #12 - February 9th, 2006, 11:48 am
    I am truly a fan of Pizza D.O. C. -- it is the closest to true Italian pizza I have found in Chicago. Thin, crispy, and fabulous quality ingredients. I also like the atmosphere. The service can be slow so just know that before you go.

    2251 W. Lawrence
    CHICAGO, IL. 60625
    Phone: 773-784-8777
    http://www.pizza-doc.com/index.html
  • Post #13 - February 9th, 2006, 12:07 pm
    Post #13 - February 9th, 2006, 12:07 pm Post #13 - February 9th, 2006, 12:07 pm
    Evil Ronnie and I are addicted to the wood oven pizza at Caponie's on Harlem. We have been known to schlepp out 3 times in one week! We prefer thin crust pizza and theirs is fantastic in our estimation.



    Caponie's Pizza
    3350 N. Harlem
    Chicago773-804-9024
  • Post #14 - February 9th, 2006, 12:18 pm
    Post #14 - February 9th, 2006, 12:18 pm Post #14 - February 9th, 2006, 12:18 pm
    I don't see how Oggi Trattoria can't be near the top of most lists for best pizza in the city. Pretty much always stick with basil and tomatoes as the topping, and also usually order it well-done and it has never been anything but fantastic.
    A huge bonus is the quality and variety they offer on their menu (never had a bad pasta dish here), and the restaurant itself is in such a great part of town: well worth the visit. We usually get delivery but the pizza is twice as good if eaten there.
    Jamie

    Oggi Trattoria
    1378 W Grand Ave
    Chicago IL 60622
    Located at the Corner of Grand & Noble
    312-733-0442
    http://oggitrattoria.com/
  • Post #15 - February 9th, 2006, 12:22 pm
    Post #15 - February 9th, 2006, 12:22 pm Post #15 - February 9th, 2006, 12:22 pm
    IMO pan and deep dish are the same, just the difference in terminology the pizzeria uses.

    You may want to consider Salerno's on West Grand. They call it "Sicilian" and it has a thicker, doughy crust (not like traditional Uno at all). They also make a thinner version. I love their ingredients; there's something about it that is totally unique.
  • Post #16 - February 9th, 2006, 9:24 pm
    Post #16 - February 9th, 2006, 9:24 pm Post #16 - February 9th, 2006, 9:24 pm
    Pequod's Pizza. Hands down my favorite. The wife and I always hit the Pan along with a few bottles of Tucher. The Chicago location is under construction, but the Morton Grove location will still deliver into the city.

    Here are a few other reviews that may help you out a bit.

    http://centerstage.net/patronreviews/pr.cfm?ID=6248&which=place
    http://www.lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.php?t=6902&highlight=

    Pequod's Pizzeria
    2207 N Clybourn Ave
    Chicago, IL 60614
    (773) 327-1512


    Pequod's Pizzeria
    8520 Fernald Ave
    Morton Grove, IL
    847-470-9161
    Greasy Spoon
  • Post #17 - February 10th, 2006, 1:58 am
    Post #17 - February 10th, 2006, 1:58 am Post #17 - February 10th, 2006, 1:58 am
    Now, truthfully, I haven't had their pizzas, but I'm sure they are good.

    Their pasta is awesome. ^_^

    Graziano's
    5960 West Touhy Ave.
    Niles, IL 60714
    Phone: 847•647•4096
    http://www.grazianosrestaurant.com/
    Hours:
    Sun-Thurs. 11:30-10pm
    Fri & Sat 11:30-11pm
    Akane
    A goin' out type of foodie gal
  • Post #18 - February 10th, 2006, 7:10 am
    Post #18 - February 10th, 2006, 7:10 am Post #18 - February 10th, 2006, 7:10 am
    Graziano's is one of the businesses that are always part of the advertising slideshow before the lights go down at movies at the Skokie Crown 18. Therefore, naturally, I've always assumed they sucked. I'm glad to know they don't.

    (I wonder if businesses realize that what they're mainly accomplishing by being part of these slideshows is convincing potential customers that they must suck? It reeks of cheesy desperation, no pun intended. I suppose they don't realize that.)
  • Post #19 - February 10th, 2006, 12:20 pm
    Post #19 - February 10th, 2006, 12:20 pm Post #19 - February 10th, 2006, 12:20 pm
    riddlemay wrote:Graziano's is one of the businesses that are always part of the advertising slideshow before the lights go down at movies at the Skokie Crown 18. Therefore, naturally, I've always assumed they sucked. I'm glad to know they don't.

    (I wonder if businesses realize that what they're mainly accomplishing by being part of these slideshows is convincing potential customers that they must suck? It reeks of cheesy desperation, no pun intended. I suppose they don't realize that.)


    heh, nope, they don't suck, their bread and pasta were awesome, IMHO. I haven't had their wood fired pizzas yet, but it must be good if Zagat's showcased them one year. I'd like to go back to try their pizzas.
    Akane
    A goin' out type of foodie gal
  • Post #20 - February 10th, 2006, 12:37 pm
    Post #20 - February 10th, 2006, 12:37 pm Post #20 - February 10th, 2006, 12:37 pm
    As a fairly new resident in the Montclare/Elmwood Park area, I recently tried Armand's - and it is good thin crust. (Note: their pastas are not so great, so stick to the thin crust.)

    Armand's
    7402 W. Grand
    Elmwood Park

    I've also heard very good things about Caponie's (cited above), but have not tried it yet.
  • Post #21 - February 10th, 2006, 3:17 pm
    Post #21 - February 10th, 2006, 3:17 pm Post #21 - February 10th, 2006, 3:17 pm
    Regarding Pat's Pizza. . . .There was an article the trade pub "Pizza Today" interviewing the owner of Pat's saying that he moved the old oven to the new location to assure the product would stay the same.

    Yes, I am in the pizza businss, no, I don't work for Pat's, but I do work for someone else mention in this thread.
  • Post #22 - February 10th, 2006, 3:20 pm
    Post #22 - February 10th, 2006, 3:20 pm Post #22 - February 10th, 2006, 3:20 pm
    Subscriptions to "Pizza Today" would be a great gift idea!
  • Post #23 - February 10th, 2006, 3:34 pm
    Post #23 - February 10th, 2006, 3:34 pm Post #23 - February 10th, 2006, 3:34 pm
    vervante wrote:IMO pan and deep dish are the same, just the difference in terminology the pizzeria uses.

    You may want to consider Salerno's on West Grand. They call it "Sicilian" and it has a thicker, doughy crust (not like traditional Uno at all). They also make a thinner version. I love their ingredients; there's something about it that is totally unique.


    Isn't Salerno's closed?
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #24 - February 10th, 2006, 3:39 pm
    Post #24 - February 10th, 2006, 3:39 pm Post #24 - February 10th, 2006, 3:39 pm
    Akane wrote:
    riddlemay wrote:Graziano's is one of the businesses that are always part of the advertising slideshow before the lights go down at movies at the Skokie Crown 18. Therefore, naturally, I've always assumed they sucked. I'm glad to know they don't.

    (I wonder if businesses realize that what they're mainly accomplishing by being part of these slideshows is convincing potential customers that they must suck? It reeks of cheesy desperation, no pun intended. I suppose they don't realize that.)


    heh, nope, they don't suck, their bread and pasta were awesome, IMHO. I haven't had their wood fired pizzas yet, but it must be good if Zagat's showcased them one year. I'd like to go back to try their pizzas.


    Graziano's is a favorite destination of the Chow Poodle, therefore I have eaten there extensively after movies and such. The best thing I can say about them is that they're consistent and the salads are "bottomless". The food is always cooked in that particular suburban way that says, "This place is nice and clean and nothing will hurt you." The food is fine, but nothing distinguishes it above any other of a myriad of other suburban places that are pretty much all the same. They do, however have a wood burning oven FWIW.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #25 - February 11th, 2006, 10:49 am
    Post #25 - February 11th, 2006, 10:49 am Post #25 - February 11th, 2006, 10:49 am
    POI three posts on Grazino's and nobody said how the pizza is.

    Carlywood- Give John's on Western a try for thin crust in an
    old style Chicago pizza joint setting. Very good product. If
    anyone orders this to go or deliveried tell them to NOT cover
    it with aluminum foil, unless you prefer your thin crust
    steamed.
    Fellow posters tout Candlelite (2 for 1 Tuesdays, checK first)
    Maries and Vito & Nick's which I'll try when in their neighorhoods.
    Pizza Capri's 4 cheese w tomatoe slices is great.
    Quick slice: Santullos (North, east of Damen) or Pizza-ria
    5-6 locations, trendy or soon to be trendy neighborhoods.
    Deep Dish: Lou Malnati's
  • Post #26 - February 11th, 2006, 11:18 am
    Post #26 - February 11th, 2006, 11:18 am Post #26 - February 11th, 2006, 11:18 am
    dashboard diner wrote:POI three posts on Grazino's and nobody said how the pizza is.




    stevez wrote:The food is always cooked in that particular suburban way that says, "This place is nice and clean and nothing will hurt you." The food is fine, but nothing distinguishes it above any other of a myriad of other suburban places that are pretty much all the same.


    This includes pizza or anything else on the menu that I have tried. Most of the pizza choices are some kind of frou frou pizza topping combos, but margherita is offered as is a carmelized onion and sausage with yellow peppers.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #27 - February 11th, 2006, 12:25 pm
    Post #27 - February 11th, 2006, 12:25 pm Post #27 - February 11th, 2006, 12:25 pm
    stevez wrote:Most of the pizza choices are some kind of frou frou pizza topping combos

    It qualifies as frou-frou, I suppose, but Graziano's does have a "secret menu" choice I'm fond of: the mesclun "pizza," a cheese-topped crust covered with balsamic-tossed salad greens and prosciutto. It used to be on the regular menu and they took it off, but they'll still make it if you ask.
  • Post #28 - February 11th, 2006, 3:26 pm
    Post #28 - February 11th, 2006, 3:26 pm Post #28 - February 11th, 2006, 3:26 pm
    Wow...so many great suggestions for places...I'll toss in a couple more for "Chicago-style" thin crust...Aurelio's (original in Homewood) and Home Run Inn (SW side and also suburban). One more to add where I went this past Christmas is Barnaby's...not too many locations left (we went to Schaumburg) but darn good thin crust pizza.

    Sad to say, though, the bes REALLY thin crust pizza I have ever had lies 90 miles N of Chicago...Zaffiro's in Milwaukee.
    Bob in RSM, CA...yes, I know, it's a long way from Chicago
  • Post #29 - February 11th, 2006, 3:50 pm
    Post #29 - February 11th, 2006, 3:50 pm Post #29 - February 11th, 2006, 3:50 pm
    I'll have to second Caponie's for brick oven, wood fired pizza. Definitely a different taste as compared with thin crust, deep dish or pan pizza.

    Another place for wood fired in the Northern Burbs is Abruzzo in the Deerbrook Shopping mall at Lake Cook Road and Waukegan Road. Abruzzo's is also awesome for their pastas.

    I must say that pizza in Chicago is superior no matter what kind. You don't really realize it until you leave Chicago.

    Any one else feel the same?...
    Buon Appetito!

    www.pelagovalley.com
  • Post #30 - February 12th, 2006, 4:44 am
    Post #30 - February 12th, 2006, 4:44 am Post #30 - February 12th, 2006, 4:44 am
    italo-americana wrote:I must say that pizza in Chicago is superior no matter what kind. You don't really realize it until you leave Chicago.

    Any one else feel the same?...


    No doubt about it. I spent 2 weeks in Akron Oh. about 15 years ago, so it might have changed. When I first got to town I asked everyone I met where the best pizza in town was. Every single one said Domino's. The most pathetic part? They were right.

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