LTH Home

Potluck ideas?

Potluck ideas?
  • Forum HomePost Reply BackTop
     Page 1 of 2
  • Potluck ideas?

    Post #1 - August 8th, 2004, 8:58 pm
    Post #1 - August 8th, 2004, 8:58 pm Post #1 - August 8th, 2004, 8:58 pm
    After years of office potlucks, I've exhausted my list of dishes that meet the following criteria:

      Fabulous and impressive
      Liked by non-foodies
      Feeds a crowd
      Inexpensive
      Quick to assemble
      Can be made a day ahead
      Served at room temperature or cold (or able to be heated in a crockpot)

    Does anyone have any sure-fire ideas?

    Some things I've brought over the years have been too exotic for this crowd, so I've learned to avoid things that are very spicy or contain ingredients like cilantro that a lot of people dislike. It's always a lunch in the middle of the week, so it has to be able to be made the night before.
  • Post #2 - August 8th, 2004, 9:08 pm
    Post #2 - August 8th, 2004, 9:08 pm Post #2 - August 8th, 2004, 9:08 pm
    The old standby: deviled eggs.
    But you would be fed with the finest of wheat;
    with honey from the rock I would satisfy you. Ps 81:16
  • Post #3 - August 8th, 2004, 9:57 pm
    Post #3 - August 8th, 2004, 9:57 pm Post #3 - August 8th, 2004, 9:57 pm
    My oldest daughter makes deviled eggs for many major family gatherings, and I must admit: we frequently have huge shrimp, excellent cheese and other delectables, but the simple deviled egg is usually the first to go. To make them "fancy," they could be decorated with sprigs of fresh herbs, or sprinkled with interesting spices, but, you know, just about EVERYONE likes deviled eggs, and they usually look great, however you prepare them.

    Hammond
  • Post #4 - August 8th, 2004, 10:46 pm
    Post #4 - August 8th, 2004, 10:46 pm Post #4 - August 8th, 2004, 10:46 pm
    David Hammond wrote:To make them "fancy," they could be decorated with sprigs of fresh herbs, or sprinkled with interesting spices, but, you know, just about EVERYONE likes deviled eggs, and they usually look great, however you prepare them.

    Hammond


    I don't like deviled eggs :)

    I think that's about my only comment. If the original poster had an electric griddle instead of just a crock pot i'd suggest grilling some skirt steak, tri tip, or flank steak the night before and bringing it plus onions/tomatoes/salsa/corn tortillas and letting people make their own tacos. Reheat the meat on the griddle, warm the tortillas on the griddle, everyone is happy.

    But no griddle.

    Ah well.
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #5 - August 8th, 2004, 11:50 pm
    Post #5 - August 8th, 2004, 11:50 pm Post #5 - August 8th, 2004, 11:50 pm
    Someone else has the regular concession for devilled eggs...and the kind I like are probably too spicy.

    The food needs to be able to be set out on a buffet without much attention thereafter, so a crockpot is OK, but nothing that requires any real prep on site. (The event is supposed to fit -- more or less -- into the regular lunch hour. That is, one still has to do all the work one would have to do if the lunch weren't happening.)
  • Post #6 - August 9th, 2004, 3:43 am
    Post #6 - August 9th, 2004, 3:43 am Post #6 - August 9th, 2004, 3:43 am
    Cold sesame noodle salad
  • Post #7 - August 9th, 2004, 7:05 am
    Post #7 - August 9th, 2004, 7:05 am Post #7 - August 9th, 2004, 7:05 am
    Frozen meatballs, jar of grape jelly and half to a full bottle of Heinz chili sauce thrown in a crockpot. Depends on pot and size of meatballs but this is ready in an hour to 90 mins on high when made with the 1.5 inch pre-cooked meatballs I get. Do NOT tell people what is in the sauce. Imply hours of chopping and simmering.

    If you are in the mood for more cooking wrap and bake a whole brie in phyllo and serve with a cranbery sauce tarted up with some orange and ginger marmalde, a dash each of cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves and a slurp of Grand Marnier. I prefer the sauce made from fresh cranberries but in the interest of ease I MIGHT believe canned will work. This is better hot but lasts nicely as it oozingly cools to room temp.

    Chocolate dipped strawberries are easy, classy and impressive. Use white, milk and dark chocolate.

    This is the visiting Canadian speaking so I am guessing at what is available.
  • Post #8 - August 9th, 2004, 8:38 am
    Post #8 - August 9th, 2004, 8:38 am Post #8 - August 9th, 2004, 8:38 am
    Here's a an easy recipe. You could drain the yogurt and cucumber overnight in the refrigerator and then mix everything quickly in the morning. Or this can be made the night before.

    Tzadziki Sauce
    1 pint plain yogurt
    1 large cucumber, peeled & seeded, and drained
    2 cloves garlic minced
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    1 tablespoon white vinegar
    salt & white pepper, taste
    Chopped dill

    Drain whey from yogurt using colander and cheesecloth,
    Grate cucumber and squeeze out juice.
    Mince garlic.
    Mix all ingredients. Adjust seasonings.
    Serve with pita bread or other bread.
    Bruce
    Plenipotentiary
    bruce@bdbbq.com

    Raw meat should NOT have an ingredients list!!
  • Post #9 - August 9th, 2004, 8:57 am
    Post #9 - August 9th, 2004, 8:57 am Post #9 - August 9th, 2004, 8:57 am
    My standard potluck dishes are spinach pie, which is often served at room temperature anyway, and a recipe called Millionarie Chicken, which is a Chinese chicken served on lettuce. Here's the recipe for the latter, adapted from a cook book (name forgotten) that long ago fell into tatters from overuse.

    MILLIONAIRE CHICKEN

    1 head lettuce, or a whole bunch of leaf lettuce
    1 chicken

    Sauce A:
    3 T. oil
    2 scallions, chopped
    4 slices fresh ginger, minced
    1/2 t. hot pepper flakes

    Sauce B:
    2 T. honey
    4 T. soy sauce
    1 clove garlic, crushed
    1/2 t. salt

    Boil the chicken, let it cool, take off the meat, and chop it into 1" squares (more or less).

    Arrange the lettuce leaves on a platter (I usually chop them up too). Arrange the chicken chunks over the lettuce.

    Combine Sauce A in your smallest pan and cook over medium heat 3 minutes.

    Combine Sauce B and add it to Sauce A as soon as the 3 minutes are up.

    Pour the warm sauce over the chicken and serve.

    Variation
    Cook 2 little ribboned bunches of those skinny white Japanese noodles. Drain and cool. Spread over the lettuce before adding the chicken and sauce.
  • Post #10 - August 9th, 2004, 8:58 am
    Post #10 - August 9th, 2004, 8:58 am Post #10 - August 9th, 2004, 8:58 am
    Hi,

    On the rare occasion I am at a pot luck, I will just as likely make German apple cake because it is easy to portion. It also tastes good and I enjoy making it. I also never take any back home.

    There are two schools of thought when it comes to Potluck, which appears to be my approach and everyone else I know.

    My approach: it's pot luck. Bring whatever you want adequate to share with 4-6 people.

    Other approach: it's pot luck. Tell me what you are bringing so I will make sure nobody else repeats the offer. We certainly wouldn't want the all-bread, all-salad potluck, would we? These same people will critique my approach looking for holes in the menu. My reaction is this is pot luck, sometimes you have more luck than other times.

    So what is really the potluck protocol? I realize mine is more chancy but requires far less work. The other is predictable, too much work and an interesting opportunity may be quashed because it may duplicate.

    So what is everyone else's experience?
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #11 - August 9th, 2004, 9:19 am
    Post #11 - August 9th, 2004, 9:19 am Post #11 - August 9th, 2004, 9:19 am
    At work we resolve this issue by passing around a sign-up sheet so people can see what others are bringing. People can then go negotiate directly if someone is bringing exactly what they were hoping to bring themselves.

    At our block party we resolve this by assigning the even numbered houses to bring a main dish plus dessert and the odd numbered houses to bring a salad or side dish plus dessert. Then the next year we switch the main/side assignments. We hit on this idea probably 15 years ago now, and it's worked well since. The real genius is getting all those desserts, since people tend to sit around eating them well into the evening, long after the other dishes have been cleared away.

    This great idea (which I confess was mine) also lets me make my spinach pie every year. In some years we have ended up with three or four different lasagnas, but no one complained and the next year some of the lasagna makers brought something else. Overall, it works as a good compromise between the plan-everything-to-the-last-olive approach and the pure "good luck' approach.
  • Post #12 - August 9th, 2004, 11:19 am
    Post #12 - August 9th, 2004, 11:19 am Post #12 - August 9th, 2004, 11:19 am
    At work we resolve this issue by passing around a sign-up sheet so people can see what others are bringing. People can then go negotiate directly if someone is bringing exactly what they were hoping to bring themselves.


    Maybe I should invoke the miracle of the internet and create mini-webpages for these events. My potlucks tend to involve people I see once a month, so there isn't the casual co-mingling as an office environment allows.

    The high maintenance types start to call people when they don't hear a response. I cannot always be so accomodating. I recently volunteered to bring 'A' the hostess said she would prefer 'X' something outside of what I do. In the end, I provided neither and showed up with Bratwurst which made everyone happy. I did intend to cooperate with attempting 'X,' I just ran out of time and energy.

    I do like the everyone brings dessert and divy up the main course and side dishes. A stroke of social genius.
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #13 - August 9th, 2004, 12:42 pm
    Post #13 - August 9th, 2004, 12:42 pm Post #13 - August 9th, 2004, 12:42 pm
    LAZ wrote:
      Fabulous and impressive
      Liked by non-foodies
      Feeds a crowd
      Inexpensive
      Quick to assemble
      Can be made a day ahead
      Served at room temperature or cold (or able to be heated in a crockpot)
    Does anyone have any sure-fire ideas?


    I had to dig deep in memory for this, but it fits the bill:

    mango black bean salsa.

    ingredients:
    cooked, chilled black beans
    diced mango
    diced onion
    minced garlic
    fresh cilantro
    lemon/lime juice
    fresh hot pepper
    salt

    shelf stable, impressive, non-foodies like it etc etc. Bring chips to dip & a six pack of negra modelo or bottle of good tequila and a bowl of lemons.

    Come to think of it--might not be bad on a Cathy2's brats or even a 'Chicago Hot Dog', given all the other stuff its not unusual for youse second city guys to pile on there.
    Chicago is my spiritual chow home
  • Post #14 - August 9th, 2004, 4:04 pm
    Post #14 - August 9th, 2004, 4:04 pm Post #14 - August 9th, 2004, 4:04 pm
    Another disgustingly easy dish that's not likely to be duplicated and would take well to your crock pot is a jambalaya made with the Zatarain's mix and souped up to your specifications. My usual additions are turkey kielbasa, green and red peppers, and onions. I also add some white rice and some more liquid to match the additional rice. You could bring some interesting hot sauces for people who want to zing it up further.

    I see that the Zatarain's site, http://www.zatarain.com/recipes/recipe. ... _Jambalaya suggests making it with beer. Not something I've tried.

    I'm not sure that this is "fabulous and impressive" but at least it's not boring and otherwise meets your critiera.
  • Post #15 - August 9th, 2004, 4:21 pm
    Post #15 - August 9th, 2004, 4:21 pm Post #15 - August 9th, 2004, 4:21 pm
    Zatarain's mix


    What do you think of their products? When I was in Mississippi earlier this year, I took my sister on a shopping trip through Sam's Club; no Costco nearby. I bought a half gallon jar of their seasoning because the price was so great. Later, I thought a regular retail jar would have been enough especially as I have never used this product before. I guess I am as gullible as anyone else by the fabulous price.

    Anyway, what can you tell me about it?
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #16 - August 9th, 2004, 4:34 pm
    Post #16 - August 9th, 2004, 4:34 pm Post #16 - August 9th, 2004, 4:34 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:
    Zatarain's mix


    What do you think of their products?


    For what it's worth, I posted a request for good red beans and rice preps on Chowhound sometime in the past, and I got a surprising amount of suggestions to just use Zatarain's mix. I tried it, and it was decent enough. Not nearly as great an abomination as some other convenience products discussed today, like say, Pasta-Roni. Also not a particularly satisfying substitute for the real thing.
  • Post #17 - August 10th, 2004, 8:54 am
    Post #17 - August 10th, 2004, 8:54 am Post #17 - August 10th, 2004, 8:54 am
    Not nearly as great an abomination as some other convenience products discussed today, like say, Pasta-Roni. Also not a particularly satisfying substitute for the real thing.

    I agree with this assessment for the jambalaya and the gumbo mixes, and would add that for the time and effort needed to prepare it, it's pretty decent, and would fit the stated potluck criteria. I have had difficulty finding their gumbo mix recently, but recommend it with frozen uncooked shrimp.

    The red beans and rice have become a camping staple for us--being hungry and deep in the heart of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area in northern MN makes them extra-delicious (but then again, this also applies to Kraft mac and cheese with tuna and mustard and a number of other things that wouldn't sound very good at home :D ). I've noticed that Zatarians now has a new format, already cooked and sealed in plastic, only to have water added (I think), but I have been sort of turned off and hesitant to try them.
  • Post #18 - August 10th, 2004, 3:00 pm
    Post #18 - August 10th, 2004, 3:00 pm Post #18 - August 10th, 2004, 3:00 pm
    7-layer salad. (have to keep cold however)
    I top a mix of romaine and iceberg lettuce with water chestnuts, frozen peas (thawed), chopped celery with a mayo dressing (mayo/seasoned salt/sugar). Top with sliced hard-boiled eggs, crumbled bacon, grated cheddar and parmesean cheeses. Sprinkle with paprika. Chill at least a few hours before serving.
  • Post #19 - August 10th, 2004, 3:20 pm
    Post #19 - August 10th, 2004, 3:20 pm Post #19 - August 10th, 2004, 3:20 pm
    I like the Zatarain's mixes. It tells you something, about them and/or about me, that they're so spicy that I regularly cut them with white rice and addiitonal liquid. I do think adding the real peppers and onions improves them a lot.

    And I did try, just last night, the pre-cooked stuff in the shelf-stable packaging. We haven't had rice since the kitchen remodeling started in June and I wanted some with the shrimp I'd bought from Ultra Foods. I cooked the shrimp and peppers and onion on the electric griddle (my one cooking implement) and then basically stir fried the rice into the peppers and onion. I can't imagine doing it except under equally unusual circumstances, but it was edible.
  • Post #20 - August 10th, 2004, 5:27 pm
    Post #20 - August 10th, 2004, 5:27 pm Post #20 - August 10th, 2004, 5:27 pm
    I managed to dig out the file of some of of the recipes that have been popular at these potlucks. (Unfortunately, the file of my own recipes, which were stored separately, is missing, and I think it may have gone in a disk crash a year or so ago.)

    However, the only thing I've ever brought that was an unqualified success was a dessert: Lamingtons -- a ubiquitous Australian cake, a staple at every Down Under bake sale -- which are something like pound cake, rolled in chocolate icing and coconut.

    Other offerings, including cold sesame noodles, barley and basil salad, tea-smoked turkey, and Caribbean roast pork, served cold with mango salsa, have drawn decidedly mixed reactions. A few people raved; others thought they were too weird. (My husband appreciated the leftovers, so that wasn't too humiliating.)

    Anyway, here are some recipes for things people really liked.


    Potluck recipes

    Barb Kelly's deviled eggs

    1 dozen large eggs
    4 teaspoons mayonnaise
    3 tablespoons yellow mustard
    1 teaspoon pickle relish
    1/4 teaspoon white vinegar
    Finely chopped celery or onion (optional)
    Paprika
    8 to 10 pimiento-stuffed olives, sliced

    In a large saucepan, cover the eggs with water by about 1 inch. Bring to a boil. Cover, remove from the heat and let stand 20 minutes. Run under cold water to cool for easier peeling. Peel the eggs and cut them in half, removing the yolks to a bowl.

    With a fork, mash the yolks with the mayonnaise, mustard. relish, vinegar and celery or onion.

    Fill each egg-white halves with 2 teaspoon of the yolk mixture, then pile on a bit more. Sprinkle with paprika and top each with an olive slice. Store covered and refrigerated (toothpicks will help keep plastic wrap off the eggs.) 12 servings.


    Preston Adams' spinach balls with sherry sauce

    "This recipe entails a good deal of work," Adams says, "but it's well worth the effort. It's a fantastic Italian appetizer." He says he got the recipe from his landlady, but notes that she clipped it from a Lerner newspaper some years ago.

    Spinach balls:
    2 packages frozen chopped spinach, cooked according to the package directions
    1 pound ricotta cheese
    1 cup grated parmesan cheese
    1 cup breadcrumbs
    4 eggs, beaten
    1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
    Salt and pepper to taste

    Sherry sauce:
    1 small onion, chopped
    1 clove garlic, crushed
    1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley
    1 tablespoon dried basil
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    1 28-ounce can Italian plum tomatoes
    1 8-ounce can tomato paste
    1 cup dry sherry
    1 bay leaf
    Flour
    1/4 cup grated parmesan cheese

    Prepare the spinach balls: Cool and drain the spinach; press with your hands to remove all liquid. Combine with the cheeses, breadcrumbs, eggs and spices in a bowl. Form into balls the size of walnuts. Place in a single layer in the freezer while you assemble the sauce.

    Make the sauce: Saute the onion, garlic, parsley and basil in the olive oil over medium-high heat just until slightly brown. Put the tomatoes in a blender or food processor and puree; add to the onion mixture. Dissolve the tomato paste in the sherry and add it, along with the bay leaf. Cook until slightly thickened, about 45 minutes.

    Assemble and bake: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Remove the spinach balls from the freezer and roll in flour. Let them stand for a few minutes and roll them again in flour. (This helps them to hold together.) Drop the balls into boiling water, a few at a time, and cook a few minutes until they rise to the top. Remove with slotted spoon and place in a 9-by-13-inch baking dish. (Do not crowd. Leave room between each ball in order to spoon out easily.)

    When the sauce is done cooking, spoon it over the spinach balls; sprinkle with a little parmesan cheese. Bake 30 minutes. 10 to 12 servings.


    Pat Sullivan's lasagna

    "All these measurements are approximate," Sullivan warns, "but close." She starts this recipe the day before serving: "Lasagna is always better the second day, so you get the second-day taste the first time you serve it this way. Also, if you're having guests, you do the cooking and make the mess the day before, and just have it to stick it in the oven the next day while you make a salad and garlic bread or whatever."

    Sauce:
    2 tablespoons roasted-garlic olive oil
    1 large Vidalia or other sweet onion, chopped
    1/4 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
    1 pound ground beef
    1 1/2 pounds mild italian sausage, casings removed
    3 15-ounce cans tomato sauce
    1 28-ounce can whole tomatoes, slightly crushed
    1 teaspoon chopped fresh oregano
    1 teaspoon chopped fresh basil
    1/2 teaspoon freshly-ground multicolored pepper blend
    3 tablespoons freshly grated parmesan

    Lasagna:
    12 ounces fat-free cottage cheese
    1 large egg
    1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons freshly grated parmesan cheese
    1 pound lasagna noodles
    1 1/2 pounds sliced mozzarella cheese

    Make the sauce: Heat the oil in a dutch oven over medium heat, add the onion and mushrooms and cook till the mushrooms are limp. Remove them from the pan, and brown the ground beef. Remove it from the pan with a slotted spoon and pour off the excess grease. Break up the sausage meat and brown it over a low to medium flame so that it doesn't burn. Remove it from the pan with the slotted spoon and pour off the excess grease.

    Return the vegetables and browned meat to the pan. Combine the tomato sauce, tomatoes, oregano and basil in the pan. Season with the pepper and parmesan cheese. Over medium to low heat, simmer while the pasta cooks. (If the sauce looks too thin, add a little tomato paste.)

    Assemble the lasagna: Mix the cottage cheese, egg and 1/4 cup of the parmesan together in a bowl. Set aside. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil and cook the noodles al dente according to package directions. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

    When the pasta is cooked, put a little of the sauce on the bottom of a 11-by-13-inch pan. Arrange a layer of noodles, lying flat, on top. Drizzle with sauce, then layer mozzarella slices over that. Then more noodles, sauce, cheese, noodles. Spread the cottage-cheese mixture evenly over the noodles, then continue layering noodles, sauce, mozzarella, noodles, sauce and mozzarella.

    Sprinkle more freshly grated parmesan over the top and bake for about 20 to 30 minutes -- just till set. (The cheese on the top will have melted somewhat but will still be white.)

    Cover it with foil and refrigerate it till the next morning. A couple of hours before you plan to serve it, take it out and let it warm up a bit, then bake it again for about 45 minutes or so at 400 degrees, till the top browns and it's hot all the way through. 10 to 12 servings.


    Anna DiBari's sweet-and-sour meatballs

    2 pounds ground beef round steak
    1 1.5-ounce envelope onion-soup mix
    1/4 cup breadcrumbs
    3 eggs, beaten
    1 16-ounce can sauerkraut (do not drain)
    1 16-ounce can jellied cranberry sauce
    1 12-ounce bottle chili sauce
    ta1 cup water
    3/4 cup sugar

    Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Lightly mix the ground beef, soup mix, breadcrumbs and eggs. Form into meatballs and place in a single layer in the bottom of a 9-by-13-inch pan.

    Mix together the sauerkraut, cranberry sauce and chili sauce and pour over the meatballs. Bake uncovered for 1 hour and 45 minutes. 8 servings.


    Rob Mandik's turkey chipotle chili

    Note that it doesn't produce the familiar-looking red chili -- it's green.

    2 canned whole chipotle chilies in adobo or to taste
    2 26-ounce cans whole tomatillos, drained
    2 large onions, chopped
    8 large garlic cloves, minced
    3 tablespoons olive oil
    3 tablespoons ground cumin
    4 pounds ground turkey
    2 14-ounce cans chicken broth
    2 bay leaves
    1 1/2 teaspoons dried oregano, crumbled
    2 teaspoons salt, or to taste
    1 green bell pepper, chopped
    2 4-ounce cans chopped mild green chilies
    1 tablespoon cornmeal
    2 15-ounce cans white beans, rinsed and drained
    1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
    Sour cream, limes, tortilla chips as an accompaniment if desired

    In a blender, puree chipotle chilies and drained tomatillos and reserve the puree. In a large heavy pot, cook the onions and 6 of the garlic cloves in the oil over moderate heat, stirring, until the onions are softened. Add the cumin, and cook the mixture, stirring, for 30 seconds.

    Add the turkey and cook the mixture, stirring and breaking up the lumps, until the turkey is no longer pink. Add the reserved chipotle-tomatillo puree, the broth, the bay leaf, the oregano, and the salt and simmer the mixture, uncovered, adding more broth or water if necessary to keep the turkey barely covered, for 1 hour.

    Stir in the bell pepper, the canned green chilies, and the cornmeal and simmer the mixture, stirring occasionally, for 30 minutes. Stir in the white beans, the cilantro, the remaining 2 garlic cloves and salt to taste. Simmer the chili for 3 to 5 minutes, or until the beans are heated through, and discard the bay leaf.

    The chili may be frozen or made 3 days in advance, cooled, uncovered, and kept covered and chilled. Serve the chili with the sour cream, lime wedges, and tortilla chips or crusty bread. Makes about 14 cups, 6 to 8 servings.


    Lizzy Sette's taco salad

    A very orange-colored salad.

    1 pound ground beef, browned and drained
    1 pound shredded iceberg lettuce
    1 pound cheddar cheese, shredded
    1 12-ounce bottle Catalina salad dressing
    1 13-ounce bag tortilla chips, crushed

    Combine all ingredients. 6 servings.


    Amie Szymanski's frozen watermelon cake

    2 1/2 gallons cherry ice cream (pick a nice pink one), slightly softened
    1 cup chocolate chips (6 ounces)
    1 8-ounce container frozen whipped topping, thawed
    Green food coloring
    Green decorative sugar

    Mix the ice cream and chocolate chips together and pack into two medium bowls, reserving some of the ice cream. Smooth the tops, cover and freeze overnight. Unmold onto plates (it may be necessary to warm the outside with hot water).

    Fuse both sides together, using the reserved ice cream, to create a sphere.

    Tint the whipped topping with the food coloring and frost all sides of the ice cream. Sprinkle sugar in rows to create a watermelon effect. 30 to 36 servings.

    Edited to fix post-migration formatting problems.
    Last edited by LAZ on June 2nd, 2010, 12:03 pm, edited 4 times in total.
  • Post #21 - August 10th, 2004, 6:22 pm
    Post #21 - August 10th, 2004, 6:22 pm Post #21 - August 10th, 2004, 6:22 pm
    Hi,

    I found a link to Lamingtons, which also shows a picture of the dear cakes. These just scream tea party.

    I was in Australia and New Zealand for a month some years ago. I just adored afternoon teas. Never missed one!
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #22 - August 12th, 2004, 8:11 pm
    Post #22 - August 12th, 2004, 8:11 pm Post #22 - August 12th, 2004, 8:11 pm
    Well, the big bash was today. There were two kinds of chili; a few salads, including a seven-layer taco salad with black beans; sub sandwiches provided by the company; stuffed cabbage, made by somebody's sister -- and a whole raft of desserts. The hit was the Texas-style chili.

    People didn't rave about the dish I made -- a few people made a point of saying they liked it: "It's something different -- but they ate it. (Well, about half of it). On the other hand, there were fewer dishes than usual this year for some reason. Oh, well. It doesn't fit the "impressive" part of my criteria, but it's colorful and fits the rest pretty well.

    Moroccan sweet carrot slaw*

    This sweet slaw is based on a Sephardic Jewish recipe. The dressing has a subtle, perfumey character. Next time I make it, I think I will use slivered almonds instead of pine nuts, and perhaps add some Zante currants, plumped in orange juice. You could also omit the orange-flower water and add some grated fresh ginger to the dressing, for something a little zestier.

      4 pounds carrots, finely shredded
      Salt to taste
      1 1/3 cups freshly squeezed lemon juice
      1 cup honey (not too dark)
      1/4 cup orange-flower water
      Leaf lettuce
      2/3 cup pine nuts, toasted

    Sprinkle the carrots with salt. In a blender, combine the lemon juice, honey and orange-flower water. Toss with the carrots, cover and refrigerate till serving time.

    Serve in a lettuce-lined bowl, garnished with pine nuts. 40 side-dish servings.


    If you try this, tell me what you thought of it. (Obviously, the recipe can be cut down for a smaller crowd.)

    And keep those suggestions coming. There's always next year.


    *To make this into finger food, scoop into Boston lettuce leaves, roll up like little burritos and secure with toothpicks.
  • Post #23 - July 5th, 2008, 2:09 am
    Post #23 - July 5th, 2008, 2:09 am Post #23 - July 5th, 2008, 2:09 am
    LAZ wrote:I managed to dig out the file of some of of the recipes that have been popular at these potlucks....

    Barb Kelly's deviled eggs
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Image
    9-year-old cheddar and Barb Kelly's deviled eggs by Giles

    Ann Fisher wrote:My standard potluck dishes are spinach pie, which is often served at room temperature anyway, and a recipe called Millionarie Chicken, which is a Chinese chicken served on lettuce....
    ronnie_suburban wrote:Image
    Millionaire chicken by Ann Fisher

    LAZ wrote:Moroccan sweet carrot slaw

    This sweet slaw is based on a Sephardic Jewish recipe. The dressing has a subtle, perfumey character. Next time I make it, I think I will use slivered almonds instead of pine nuts, and perhaps add some Zante currants, plumped in orange juice. You could also omit the orange-flower water and add some grated fresh ginger to the dressing, for something a little zestier....

    Ronnie_suburban's great photos from the LTHForum 1,000-Recipe Potluck, June 22, 2008, appear here and include these shots of Barb Kelly's deviled eggs, as prepared by Giles, and Ann's Millionaire chicken.

    GreenFish's notes on making my Moroccan sweet carrot slaw for the LTH Potluck are here; scroll down for my follow-up.
  • Post #24 - December 5th, 2012, 9:20 am
    Post #24 - December 5th, 2012, 9:20 am Post #24 - December 5th, 2012, 9:20 am
    Its that time of year again, and I have been beating my brain for something to make. I always try to make a main course type dish. Last year I smoked a pork shoulder (I stayed up most of the night watching it, made for a slow day for me). We have way too many salads and desserts so I like to avoid having another. Our group is about 18 people. I was wondering what you all bring to your office potlucks. Whats the best thing you have ever made? Whats the best thing you have ever tasted at one?
  • Post #25 - December 5th, 2012, 9:42 am
    Post #25 - December 5th, 2012, 9:42 am Post #25 - December 5th, 2012, 9:42 am
    One thing I have made that is always a hug hit is hot dog rumaki
    mini hotdogs plus sliced water chestnuts
    wrap in half a slice of bacon
    put in a 9 x 13 baking dish
    sprinkle the whole thing with bigh handfuls of brown sugar and bake at 400 until sugar is melted and bacon is crispy.
    you may need to turn on the broiler for a minute or two near the end.
    ALways is a big hit at parties,but for an office potluck there's the need to be hot problem.

    This year for my office potluck I'm making Alton Browns Ambrosia but with store bought marshmallows.
    I just have a taste for it.
    "If you reject the food, ignore the customs, fear the religion and avoid the people, you might better stay home."
    ~James Michener
  • Post #26 - December 6th, 2012, 8:14 am
    Post #26 - December 6th, 2012, 8:14 am Post #26 - December 6th, 2012, 8:14 am
    Potlucks can be a real problem. Some of my friends think hummus is exotic and do not like it. I always try to make a crowd pleaser rather than something exotic. What about a nice pan of home made macaroni and cheese? That would be very popular. Also a crock pot of homemade sloppy joes with good buns. People love those. A pan of spanakopita. I have heard that is relatively easy to make. Or a pan of stuffed shells with sauce and topped with cheese.

    I do like deviled eggs. Here is a recipe that appeared on the back of the box of Jay's potato chips and they are delicious. Nobody will guess about the crushed potato chips but they add a nice salty crunch as does the bacon. I double the recipe as these vanish fast. I also add a bit of dry mustard or a few drops of hot sauce to zip it up a notch.

    Chip Eggs

    4 eggs, hard boiled
    2 -4 tablespoons mayonnaise
    1/4 cup crushed potato chips
    4 slices cooked bacon, crumbled
    2 teaspoons parsley
    paprika
    pepper
    Directions
    1. Cut the eggs in half, lengthwise and scoop out yolks to a large bowl.
    2. Mix in mayonnaise, potato chips, bacon and parsley. (Note that the potato chips will absorb some of the moisture, so I have noted 2-4 tbs. of mayo. I usually use more than less).
    3. Stuff egg whites with yolk mixture.
    4. Sprinkle with paprika and pepper.
    (Refrain from adding salt, as the salt on the potato chips adds flavor).
    Toria

    "I like this place and willingly could waste my time in it" - As You Like It,
    W. Shakespeare
  • Post #27 - December 7th, 2012, 9:29 am
    Post #27 - December 7th, 2012, 9:29 am Post #27 - December 7th, 2012, 9:29 am
    I'm a fan of carnitas or barbacoa tacos. Buy some El Milagro corn tortillas, chop up a bit of onion and cilantro for the side and provide some hot sauce (homemade last time). Actually, the onion and cilantro barely were touched, but all the taco filling was gone.
  • Post #28 - December 7th, 2012, 10:43 am
    Post #28 - December 7th, 2012, 10:43 am Post #28 - December 7th, 2012, 10:43 am
    gleam wrote:
    David Hammond wrote:To make them "fancy," they could be decorated with sprigs of fresh herbs, or sprinkled with interesting spices, but, you know, just about EVERYONE likes deviled eggs, and they usually look great, however you prepare them.

    Hammond


    I don't like deviled eggs :)

    Me either.
    This past Halloween, I made mini sloppy joes with chorizo and roasted poblanos (sloppy josés). You can put them in jumbo cupcake cups. Quick, easy, can be done ahead of time, and could even be eaten with chips if they didn't want the mess of a sandwich.
    I want to have a good body, but not as much as I want dessert. ~ Jason Love

    There is no pie in Nighthawks, which is why it's such a desolate image. ~ Happy Stomach

    I write fiction. You can find me—and some stories—on Facebook, Twitter and my website.
  • Post #29 - December 7th, 2012, 4:53 pm
    Post #29 - December 7th, 2012, 4:53 pm Post #29 - December 7th, 2012, 4:53 pm
    Pie Lady wrote:
    gleam wrote:
    David Hammond wrote:To make them "fancy," they could be decorated with sprigs of fresh herbs, or sprinkled with interesting spices, but, you know, just about EVERYONE likes deviled eggs, and they usually look great, however you prepare them.

    Hammond


    I don't like deviled eggs :)

    Me either.
    This past Halloween, I made mini sloppy joes with chorizo and roasted poblanos (sloppy josés). You can put them in jumbo cupcake cups. Quick, easy, can be done ahead of time, and could even be eaten with chips if they didn't want the mess of a sandwich.



    I've always loathed sloppy joes. Even the smell of them sends me running.

    Deviled eggs, I could eat forever. :mrgreen:

    This year's go to dish for potlucks has been a curried cauliflower with rice, garbanzo beans, & coconut milk. I swapped out whipping cream for coconut milk in a Martha Stewart Everyday Food(RIP) Recipe. This is a tasty, substantial, easy, vegan, & gluten-free recipe that meat-eaters have loved.

    One-Pot Curried Cauliflower Rice with Coconut Milk, inspired by Martha Stewart

    Ingredients

    4 t. vegetable oil

    1 large head cauliflower, cored and cut into 1 1/2-inch pieces—close to 4 lbs or more prior to coring

    Coarse salt and ground white pepper

    1 medium yellow onion, diced

    2 c. basmati rice

    4 t. curry powder

    2 cans (15.5 ounces) chickpeas, rinsed and drained

    2 3/4 c. vegetable broth

    1/2 cup Asian-style coconut milk, the kind that tastes like coconut, not the stuff you use as a replace for cows’ milk

    Preheat oven to 400 degrees. In a Dutch oven or other heavy pot, heat 2 t. oil on medium-high. Add cauliflower and cook, stirring frequently, until browned in spots, about 10 minutes and don’t be surprised if all of your cauliflower won’t fit in one layer. Remove browned cauliflower and season with salt and white pepper. Add the remaining 2 t. oil and onion to pot; cook, stirring occasionally, until onion is translucent, 3-5 minutes. Add rice, curry powder, and chickpeas to the pot and season with salt and white pepper. Cook, stirring constantly, until rice is coated, about 2 minutes. Add broth and coconut milk and bring to a boil. Scatter cauliflower over top (do not stir to combine). Cover and bake for 15 minutes. Let cool 10 minutes before serving.
    Ava-"If you get down and out, just get in the kitchen and bake a cake."- Jean Strickland

    Horto In Urbs- Falling in love with Urban Vegetable Gardening
  • Post #30 - February 8th, 2013, 9:11 am
    Post #30 - February 8th, 2013, 9:11 am Post #30 - February 8th, 2013, 9:11 am
    LAZ wrote:After years of office potlucks, I've exhausted my list of dishes that meet the following criteria:

      Fabulous and impressive
      Liked by non-foodies
      Feeds a crowd
      Inexpensive
      Quick to assemble
      Can be made a day ahead
      Served at room temperature or cold (or able to be heated in a crockpot)
    Does anyone have any sure-fire ideas?

    Bumping this thread in hopes of new ideas. In this instance, I'm going to an event with people whose tastes I don't know at all, but who all have been told about how "gourmet" I am. I'm tempted to just pick up banh mi sandwiches or something, but that seems like cheating (and possibly a waste if they turn out to be people who don't like cilantro or "exotic" foods). It's at somebody's house, so I assume an oven will be available for fast reheats, but I haven't asked.

Contact

About

Team

Advertize

Close

Chat

Articles

Guide

Events

more