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Bari Foods Review (Reprint)

Bari Foods Review (Reprint)
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  • Bari Foods Review (Reprint)

    Post #1 - November 22nd, 2004, 10:09 am
    Post #1 - November 22nd, 2004, 10:09 am Post #1 - November 22nd, 2004, 10:09 am
    Bari Foods : Some Notes (Reprint)

    In light of a recent request for information concerning small, independent food shops which specialise in or carry large numbers of items imported from Europe, I have decided to reprint this post here on LTH. The post was originally published on the Ides of March on a different website, which this writer no longer visits.

    The information presented below is to my knowledge all still valid except where noted in red.

    Antonius

    Bari Foods
    1120 W. Grand Ave.
    Chicago, IL
    312-666-0730

    ____________________________________

    The Bari Foods store (BF) on Grand Ave. (next to D'Amato's at the northeast corner of May and Grand) is regularly mentioned here but then primarily in the context of discussions of sandwiches and subs. BF is, indeed, a great place to get a sub (they also deliver) but it's also a very good little grocery and Italian specialty shop. Herebelow I call attention to some specific features and items.

    1) Deli counter: A basic range of cold cuts, domestic and imported are available, as well as several kinds of olives (Kalamata, Barese, Sicilian, etc.) and salads (currently including a seafood salad). They also have a number of Italian cheeses which they will cut to order, including the basic grating cheeses (Pecorino Romano (Locatelli), Parmigiano Reggiano), which they will also grate for a fee ($.50 per lb., I believe), and a few table cheese (Taleggio, Fontina, a young pecorino or two).

    * Something which they pretty much always have on hand and which is otherwise not so readily available is 'ricotta forte', imported from Italy. This Pugliese specialty is in effect a rather ripe ricotta (I think it's double fermented and made from sheep's milk, high fat content and cream cheese like texture) which has a very nice sweetness to go along with its pungency. A small dollop mixed into a plate of maccheroni with a simple tomato sauce or just garlic, oil and parsley is sublime.

    ** A common problem I have had at BF has to do with how they lay out the prosciutto; specifically, the prosciutto is laid out with too much overlap of the individual slices or, more distressingly, even carelessly tossed so that the slices are folded over and bunched up -- if the prosciutto has been sliced thin, as it should be, the excessively overlapping or bunched up slices cannot be handled without extensive tearing. This problem arises sometimes elsewhere but at BF, it seems only the owners do a reasonable job of laying the prosciutto out carefully; other, younger folk who work there, even when given explicit instructions, have given me blobs which cannot be untangled for acceptable presentation to guests.

    *** Because of the popularity of BF for subs, the lines can sometimes be a little long. If you're in a hurry and just need to get some grating cheese, they now have freshly cut pieces (1/2 to 1 lb) of Parmigiano and Romano, as well as cones of ricotta salata in the dairy cooler on the west wall.

    2) Butcher Counter: BF has been mentioned here as a source for good sausage. They have three types available: basic Italian sausage (with fennel), spicy, and Barese, which is the thin sausage, without fennel, and copious amounts of parsley and garlic. In my opinion, the Barese sausage should be cooked as soon as possible, for the large dose of garlic imparts an overpowering flavour (and frighteningly strong aroma in the fridge) if you keep it overnight. Fried and cut up, mixed with pasta along with some fresh ricotta and a little of the pasta water, it's pretty darn tasty.

    * The quality of the meat is in my experience always very good and they do a fine job cutting and grinding things per request. Since they are Italian, one can, for example, simply place an order along the following lines: 'I need five slices of beef, pounded thin, for braciole' or 'I need a chicken cut up for cacciatore.' They produce exactly what you're looking for.

    ** I haven't checked of late, but in times past they were a reliable source for rabbit. Since writing this post, I have not seen the sign posted saying that rabbit is available. Call ahead if you are specifically looking for that item.

    3) Italian Grocery Items: They have a fairly complete range of Italian specialities and a reasonable variety of brands, especially given the limited space they have.

    * Pasta: The main brand sold at BF is the pride of Puglia, Divella, and they have a very wide selection of their products. In addition, they carry a number of shapes by G. Cocco (but note that this brand has recently decided to switch from packages of 500 grams to 340 grams while not changing the price; it's excellent - perhaps the best - dried pasta but now the price is a little out of hand); they also carry several of the special regional shapes by La Molisana.

    ** Olive Oil: Always a good selection and often they have a couple of oils (typically from Sicily) which are great bargains.

    *** Salt-packed anchovies. They have whole tins of salt-packed anchovies for sale (ca. $10) from Sciacca (Sicily). There are also a couple of brands of high quality tuna packed in olive oil from Sicily (n.b. 'Genova' brand, which formerly was the most widespread tuna from Italy, has been bought out by an American brand and is now produced in the US, though packaged with the exact same old label). Also high quality oil-packed anchovies from Italy (shelves near the check-out counter).

    **** They usually have at least one brand of salt-packed capers, sometimes more, as well as a number of other imported items of the salted and pickled ilk (east wall). The canned tomato selection is very good, featuring 'La Bella San Marzano' (which bears a highly amusing label) and the underappreciated 'Rienzi' brand from Sicily (not San Marzano but really good). Small cans of the pomodorini di collina and jars of passata di pomodoro are also available.

    ***** Some prepared foods that BF produces are also on hand: giardiniera, cooked escarole, eggplant etc. I haven't tried any of these but they seem to be popular with other customers.

    4) Produce Section: BF carries a very convenient selection of vegetables and fruits, which allows one to put together a whole meal without needing to go anywhere else. They always have onions, garlic, tomatoes, potatoes, lemons, some fresh herbs, and lettuces, and usually have such items as broccoli rabe, eggplant, zucchini, etc.

    5) General Groceries: For its limited size, BF offers a surprisingly wide range of basic food stuffs and household items, as well as over-the-counter drugs etc. etc. They also get frequent deliveries of tortillas from Tortilleria Del Rey. If you have a headache, crave Italian sausage, broccoli rabe and Baci, and need to feed your cat, you can take care of it all at BF.

    6) Note that as of a couple of years ago, they no longer sell wine and spirits. They do have several Italian soft drinks (Aranciata, Limonata and, my favourite, Chinotto).

    Given the quality and wide selection of their wares, together with their location next to the best Italian bread baker in the city, Bari Foods is an outstanding resource, especially for those who can't easily make the trek out to the Harlem/Belmont area.

    Salvete,
    A



    *Originally published on the Chicago Board of Chowhound by this writer on March 15th, 2004 at 10:07:28.

    Post-site-move character problems fixed.
    Last edited by Antonius on September 15th, 2005, 6:24 am, edited 1 time in total.
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #2 - November 22nd, 2004, 11:25 am
    Post #2 - November 22nd, 2004, 11:25 am Post #2 - November 22nd, 2004, 11:25 am
    Thanks Antonius. This is a great reminder of how wonderful a store Bari is. I tend to think of it as a sub destination and often forget to think of Bari of a source of Italian ingredients (until I am there to pick up my sub).
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #3 - November 22nd, 2004, 11:52 am
    Post #3 - November 22nd, 2004, 11:52 am Post #3 - November 22nd, 2004, 11:52 am
    I would only amplify that next door is D'Amato's, arguably the best Italian bakery West of the Susquehanna. While you wait for your sub (get the red peppers, for sure), pick up a tray of sausage pizza. Also, Bari delivers to the Loop.
  • Post #4 - September 14th, 2005, 9:56 pm
    Post #4 - September 14th, 2005, 9:56 pm Post #4 - September 14th, 2005, 9:56 pm
    Bari has pine nuts in bulk and a nice selection of herbs, spices and dried mushrooms. They sell their own wonderrful sundried tomatoes, giardinara, and roasted red peppers. Also, D'amato's (next door) will sell their pizza/bread dough by the pound -- making it very easy to make homemade pizza or stromboli!!
    Nothing takes the taste out of peanut butter quite like unrequited love. Charles M. Schulz (1922 - 2000), Charlie Brown in "Peanuts"
  • Post #5 - April 19th, 2006, 7:09 pm
    Post #5 - April 19th, 2006, 7:09 pm Post #5 - April 19th, 2006, 7:09 pm
    Since there was just a question about giardinara on another thread, let me take this opportunity to extoll Bari's
    --praise long overdue.

    Image. Note first that it's medium--not that you can't get mild or hot but I'm a gal who always orders her peppers "mixed" when I have a choice and this is exactly the heat intensity I'm looking for.

    Then notice the bigger, thicker cut (get your mind out of the gutter) of vegetables. Also desirable. Image

    There may be better giardinara in town, but I haven't found it.
  • Post #6 - April 20th, 2006, 8:05 pm
    Post #6 - April 20th, 2006, 8:05 pm Post #6 - April 20th, 2006, 8:05 pm
    Oh Bari, what a gem. The smaller guy behind the counter with the salt and pepper mustache is a first class butcher (who occasionally makes a sandwich) and has always treated me graciously and in a little old fashioned manner--meaning, one time I asked for a good steak--"Is it for you or your husband or the both of you?" "Mostly for my husband," I replied. "Then I'll cut it thick. He'll like it that way." And he did. And I actually don't like super thick cuts of beef--don't know if that's a gender thing (I doubt it) but who knows?

    One thing that's not been mentioned is that once a year, maybe in fall (not sure, memory's a bit fuzzy) the teeny tiny bird-like matriarch of the Bari clan boils down a couple of dozen jars of Fig Syrup, which she sells in the same Mason Jars as the Giardinera but with hand written little labels on them. First of all, this is like the nectar of the gods and is amazing drizzled on just about anything but oh how sublime it is with TRUE aged Provolone (not the bland crap for sandwiches) and also many Spanish cheeses. And I'm not sure how many more moons she'll be making the batches, so I encourage you to ask at the store and if you see some, buy it and enjoy it. It's also lovely on ice cream and fresh whipped cream.

    bjt
    "eating is an agricultural act" wendell berry
  • Post #7 - April 6th, 2008, 12:56 am
    Post #7 - April 6th, 2008, 12:56 am Post #7 - April 6th, 2008, 12:56 am
    Even the immortals need some love once in a while.

    Our prosciutto and fresh mozzarella sub sailed out of the park today like a D-Lee home run - a foot of summer on a D'Amato's loaf still warm from next door. Perfect red tomato and lots of chunky, rosemary-scented giardiniera were the only required accompaniment to the meat, cheese, and bread trinity.

    And how about this, recalling Antonius's original point above:

    BF offers a surprisingly wide range of basic food stuffs and household items


    Image

    I made this Thai one-bite salad exclusively from Bari vegetables, with condiments already in my larder. Belgian endive, limes, finger hot peppers, and pineapple were just left of the entrance, and shredded coconut and peanuts were in easy reach from the checkout aisle. At home, I did some toasting, mixed some ponzu with grated ginger, lime pulp, and sugar, and topped off with a ribbon of sriracha. This helped me get my mise together for bao (later this weekend), and was just about the best Thai dish I've ever assembled from ingredients from an Italian deli.

    Bari. What can't it do!
  • Post #8 - April 6th, 2008, 5:13 am
    Post #8 - April 6th, 2008, 5:13 am Post #8 - April 6th, 2008, 5:13 am
    I was in South Elgin yesterday to get the State emission test done on my car. Across the street was a warehouse with a small sign..... Bari Foods, call to order. Any chance there is a link here? On a side note, on the way home we visited the new Caputo Market on Randall Road and Silve Glen Road in South Elgin. Too far to be in our shopping loop but a very impressive produce department with Mexican items I never heard of. Sorry we didn't have camera to record.

    Bari Foods
    710 Schneider Dr.
    South Elgin, Ill.
    847-695-7555
    off of Rte. 31 near Thorton gas station
  • Post #9 - April 6th, 2008, 7:41 am
    Post #9 - April 6th, 2008, 7:41 am Post #9 - April 6th, 2008, 7:41 am
    Santander -- Always good to bring these places to the attention of the board. Nice for me to be remembered too... (wink)...

    ***

    LikestoEatout -- Interesting... There are lots of Baresi in Chicagoland, so it may be coincidental inclinations to name businesses after the old patria but there could well be a connexion; I wouldn't be surprised if there were, as almost all of the owners of small Italian businesses in the old inner-city Italian neighbourhoods that I know personally (and there are quite a few that I know) live out in the suburbs.

    Antonius
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #10 - December 7th, 2008, 1:01 am
    Post #10 - December 7th, 2008, 1:01 am Post #10 - December 7th, 2008, 1:01 am
    bjt wrote:One thing that's not been mentioned is that once a year, maybe in fall (not sure, memory's a bit fuzzy) the teeny tiny bird-like matriarch of the Bari clan boils down a couple of dozen jars of Fig Syrup, which she sells in the same Mason Jars as the Giardinera but with hand written little labels on them. First of all, this is like the nectar of the gods and is amazing drizzled on just about anything but oh how sublime it is with TRUE aged Provolone (not the bland crap for sandwiches) and also many Spanish cheeses. And I'm not sure how many more moons she'll be making the batches, so I encourage you to ask at the store and if you see some, buy it and enjoy it. It's also lovely on ice cream and fresh whipped cream.


    I stopped by Bari today for a few things (sausage and pepper sandwich is really outstanding, by the way) and the fig syrup is there. I believe it is in pint sized jars and was not cheap at about $15 per jar. Reading bjt's description, however, might make me rethink my decision not to purchase a jar. There were about 8 jars (on the same shelves as the giardinera).
  • Post #11 - December 30th, 2008, 7:29 pm
    Post #11 - December 30th, 2008, 7:29 pm Post #11 - December 30th, 2008, 7:29 pm
    Matt wrote:
    bjt wrote:One thing that's not been mentioned is that once a year, maybe in fall (not sure, memory's a bit fuzzy) the teeny tiny bird-like matriarch of the Bari clan boils down a couple of dozen jars of Fig Syrup, which she sells in the same Mason Jars as the Giardinera but with hand written little labels on them. First of all, this is like the nectar of the gods and is amazing drizzled on just about anything but oh how sublime it is with TRUE aged Provolone (not the bland crap for sandwiches) and also many Spanish cheeses. And I'm not sure how many more moons she'll be making the batches, so I encourage you to ask at the store and if you see some, buy it and enjoy it. It's also lovely on ice cream and fresh whipped cream.


    I stopped by Bari today for a few things (sausage and pepper sandwich is really outstanding, by the way) and the fig syrup is there. I believe it is in pint sized jars and was not cheap at about $15 per jar. Reading bjt's description, however, might make me rethink my decision not to purchase a jar. There were about 8 jars (on the same shelves as the giardinera).


    I snagged a jar of Bari's elusive fig vincotto last week:

    Image

    Vincotto means "cooked wine," so what I have must be what's left after cooking figs in wine. And what I have is this sweet, unctuous nectar (to steal bjt's term) that is more syrupy than your average vinegar. It seems like this could be used in the same manner of a high-quality balsamic, on grilled meats, carpaccio, over cheese and, of course, as a salad dressing, which is what I used it for tonight. Unlike a cheaper-quality vinegar, however, the acidity is rather low.

    It is pricey at $15.49. There were only a few jars left on the shelf when I was there, so if you happen to see them, and don't balk at the price, don't hesitate to pick one up.
  • Post #12 - December 30th, 2008, 9:50 pm
    Post #12 - December 30th, 2008, 9:50 pm Post #12 - December 30th, 2008, 9:50 pm
    So I bought a jar of the giardinara 4 mos ago, and never opened it. It has been refrigerated the whole time. Do you think it's still ok? What's the typical shelf life unopened and once it's opened?
  • Post #13 - December 30th, 2008, 10:42 pm
    Post #13 - December 30th, 2008, 10:42 pm Post #13 - December 30th, 2008, 10:42 pm
    YMMV, but I have a friend who keeps it at room temperature, opened, for months, to no ill effect. That's perhaps because it's the "Super Hot." He goes through the medium and hot at a quicker clip.

    I refrigerate and have never gotten to four months once opened (it's usually gone within weeks). Closed and refrigerated, I think you have nothing to worry about.
  • Post #14 - December 31st, 2008, 9:48 am
    Post #14 - December 31st, 2008, 9:48 am Post #14 - December 31st, 2008, 9:48 am
    aschie30 wrote:I snagged a jar of Bari's elusive fig vincotto last week

    [. . .]

    Vincotto means "cooked wine," so what I have must be what's left after cooking figs in wine. And what I have is this sweet, unctuous nectar (to steal bjt's term) that is more syrupy than your average vinegar. It seems like this could be used in the same manner of a high-quality balsamic, on grilled meats, carpaccio, over cheese and, of course, as a salad dressing, which is what I used it for tonight. Unlike a cheaper-quality vinegar, however, the acidity is rather low.

    It is pricey at $15.49. There were only a few jars left on the shelf when I was there, so if you happen to see them, and don't balk at the price, don't hesitate to pick one up.

    I purchased a jar of the fig vincotto as well and have used it to very good effect in salad dressings and drizzled over cheese. I agree that it seems a suitable replacement for a nice balsamic, and I look forward to using it in other applications. While the price is high, Bari also sells commercial vincottos of various types that all come out to a higher price per fl. oz. than the homemade stuff.
  • Post #15 - December 31st, 2008, 10:46 am
    Post #15 - December 31st, 2008, 10:46 am Post #15 - December 31st, 2008, 10:46 am
    Is this the same Bari that supplies roast Italian beef to Joe Caputo's? If so, I'm not impressed. it's one of the few mediocre items I've got from the Caputo deli in Algonquin.
  • Post #16 - December 31st, 2008, 1:08 pm
    Post #16 - December 31st, 2008, 1:08 pm Post #16 - December 31st, 2008, 1:08 pm
    j r wrote:Is this the same Bari that supplies roast Italian beef to Joe Caputo's?


    No.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #17 - February 23rd, 2009, 11:33 pm
    Post #17 - February 23rd, 2009, 11:33 pm Post #17 - February 23rd, 2009, 11:33 pm
    Tried Bari Foods for the first time this past weekend - split 7 different subs (12 inch) between 6 people.

    Phenomenal: Italian, Meatball, Prosciutto/Mozzarella
    Excellent: Turkey (with Sundried Tomatoes)
    Good: Roast Beef, American
    OK: Corned Beef

    The line on Sunday morning (11:30) was 8 people long. We had called our sandwich order in, and got them at the tail end of our quoted pick-up time (30-40 minutes). Our total was $49, and we had plenty of sandwiches leftover, some of which I enjoyed for lunch today! Authentic place, great sandwiches, good value.
  • Post #18 - February 24th, 2009, 6:03 am
    Post #18 - February 24th, 2009, 6:03 am Post #18 - February 24th, 2009, 6:03 am
    chunker wrote:Excellent: Turkey (with Sundried Tomatoes)

    Even though processed turkey I admit to a weakness for a dressed Bari turkey sub with hot giardiniera. I alternate with an Italian sub topped with marinated artichokes and or giardiniera.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #19 - March 2nd, 2009, 11:09 pm
    Post #19 - March 2nd, 2009, 11:09 pm Post #19 - March 2nd, 2009, 11:09 pm
    Do these people work the deli and raw meat counters simultaneously?

    It seems they do.

    Anyway, Bari Foods sells "semola" flour, which is not "semolina" which is like sand. Semola is what is used to make orrichiete (with warm water, not egg).

    It is extremely difficult to find semola, semolina is easy to find, but it's not best for Pugliese pasta.
  • Post #20 - September 24th, 2009, 6:00 am
    Post #20 - September 24th, 2009, 6:00 am Post #20 - September 24th, 2009, 6:00 am
    aschie30 wrote:I snagged a jar of Bari's elusive fig vincotto last week:

    Stopped at Bari for a sub yesterday, inquired about fig syrup (vincotto) and was informed they no longer make the syrup. When asked why, they said the person who traditionally made the syrup is 97 and not physically up to the task at present. I noted they still had house-made giardiniera for sale, and was told that's different, making fig syrup is an art.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #21 - September 24th, 2009, 7:28 am
    Post #21 - September 24th, 2009, 7:28 am Post #21 - September 24th, 2009, 7:28 am
    G Wiv wrote:
    aschie30 wrote:I snagged a jar of Bari's elusive fig vincotto last week:

    Stopped at Bari for a sub yesterday, inquired about fig syrup (vincotto) and was informed they no longer make the syrup. When asked why, they said the person who traditionally made the syrup is 97 and not physically up to the task at present. I noted they still had house-made giardiniera for sale, and was told that's different, making fig syrup is an art.

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    She may not do be able to do it, she could very likely supervise and give pointers. Why isn't someone learning from her before it is too late, if that threshold hasn't already passed.

    Letting something like that go so easily is just a shame.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #22 - September 24th, 2009, 7:58 am
    Post #22 - September 24th, 2009, 7:58 am Post #22 - September 24th, 2009, 7:58 am
    Cathy2 wrote:Letting something like that go so easily is just a shame.

    Agree 100%
    Hold my beer . . .

    Low & Slow
  • Post #23 - September 30th, 2009, 1:12 pm
    Post #23 - September 30th, 2009, 1:12 pm Post #23 - September 30th, 2009, 1:12 pm
    Prosciutto and Mozzarella Sandwich

    Image

    I stopped for lunch at Bari Foods today and had myself a prosciutto and mozzarella sandwich - and I enjoyed this sandwich as much as I've enjoyed scores of other such sandwiches I've had from there over the past decade or so. The mozzarella had a melt in your mouth character today. Calling ahead minimizes the frustration of having to wait if the deli counter is busy - and call-ahead is what I did. I walked in and out the front door in 5-minutes time.

    Finding a concrete porch of sorts on one side of D'Amato's Bakery I sat and enjoyed my sandwich, in the pleasant and sunny outdoors.

    The office in which I work is a short two-block walk from Grand Avenue and I can easily catch a #65 Grand Avenue CTA bus that stops within a block walk of Bari Foods. Using the "Bus Tracker" online feature I timed my departure from the office to coincide with the next-arriving/departing bus and I didn't wait more than 5-minutes. After finishing my sandwich the wait for a bus heading back to LaSalle St. was little more than 5-minutes. Timing was on my side, today.

    I've been thinking of adding a stop at Bari Foods to my weekly lunchtime rotation and if I can continue to make good connections - to complete the round-trip and lunch-eating to an hour in total - that's probably what I'll do (maybe every other week - with the onset of Winter).
    Last edited by Bill on September 30th, 2009, 1:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #24 - September 30th, 2009, 1:15 pm
    Post #24 - September 30th, 2009, 1:15 pm Post #24 - September 30th, 2009, 1:15 pm
    Bill wrote:
    I stopped for lunch at Bari Foods today and had myself a prosciutto and mozzarella sandwich -


    What was the tab?
    i used to milk cows
  • Post #25 - September 30th, 2009, 1:19 pm
    Post #25 - September 30th, 2009, 1:19 pm Post #25 - September 30th, 2009, 1:19 pm
    teatpuller wrote:What was the tab?

    Cost of the 9" sandwich by itself was $5.50 (there's a larger, 12" version which costs more). Add the $1.50 cost of the 20 oz. Diet Pepsi and the tax and the tab for lunch came to $7.75. I have a monthly CTA/PACE pass (unlimited rides), so there was no transportation cost.
  • Post #26 - September 30th, 2009, 1:52 pm
    Post #26 - September 30th, 2009, 1:52 pm Post #26 - September 30th, 2009, 1:52 pm
    Cathy2 wrote:
    G Wiv wrote:
    aschie30 wrote:I snagged a jar of Bari's elusive fig vincotto last week:

    Stopped at Bari for a sub yesterday, inquired about fig syrup (vincotto) and was informed they no longer make the syrup. When asked why, they said the person who traditionally made the syrup is 97 and not physically up to the task at present. I noted they still had house-made giardiniera for sale, and was told that's different, making fig syrup is an art.

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    She may not do be able to do it, she could very likely supervise and give pointers. Why isn't someone learning from her before it is too late, if that threshold hasn't already passed.

    Letting something like that go so easily is just a shame.


    This reminds me of an almost legendary cake from my childhood pâtisserie in Montreal that I've been thinking about lately. From what my family has told me, it sounds like the cake was a hazelnut gâteau Breton of sorts. Anyway, the baker who made this beloved cake passed away without sharing the recipe with anyone, and others at the pâtisserie felt the cake was too special to attempt to recreate. I'm told that I enjoyed this cake as a little kid. Sadly, I don't remember it at all, but the story of the cake is one of my favorites from childhood. As much as I would love to experience that cake now, I like too that it exists only in the memories of the pâtisserie regulars from 20-30 years ago.
  • Post #27 - October 1st, 2009, 2:47 pm
    Post #27 - October 1st, 2009, 2:47 pm Post #27 - October 1st, 2009, 2:47 pm
    Johnsoncon wrote:Do these people work the deli and raw meat counters simultaneously?

    It seems they do.



    I commonly order both a sandwich and meat for dinner and two guys always handle the order. In fact, sometimes I wait a brief moment for someone to service the meat order as not a lot of people buy raw meat at noon.

    Thanks for the Semola tip, though. :D
  • Post #28 - October 10th, 2009, 11:25 am
    Post #28 - October 10th, 2009, 11:25 am Post #28 - October 10th, 2009, 11:25 am
    G Wiv wrote:
    aschie30 wrote:I snagged a jar of Bari's elusive fig vincotto last week:

    Stopped at Bari for a sub yesterday, inquired about fig syrup (vincotto) and was informed they no longer make the syrup. When asked why, they said the person who traditionally made the syrup is 97 and not physically up to the task at present. I noted they still had house-made giardiniera for sale, and was told that's different, making fig syrup is an art.

    Enjoy,
    Gary


    i was just at bari and asked ralph, one of the owners, about fig syrup. he said his father, 93, is still in good health and might make fig syrup again. he also said that the family has the recipe, so it won't be lost. one of the reasons they stopped making it is because it's very time consuming and expensive to produce. he said they'd need to charge something like $36/quart. i've never tried fig syrup but find it an intriguing concept.... though i'm more likely to give it a whirl if they package it in pints. does anyone remember how much it used to be and if they did pints? (all their other housemade canned products come in pints) .justjoan
  • Post #29 - October 11th, 2009, 9:29 pm
    Post #29 - October 11th, 2009, 9:29 pm Post #29 - October 11th, 2009, 9:29 pm
    justjoan wrote:i was just at bari and asked ralph, one of the owners, about fig syrup. he said his father, 93, is still in good health and might make fig syrup again. he also said that the family has the recipe, so it won't be lost. one of the reasons they stopped making it is because it's very time consuming and expensive to produce. he said they'd need to charge something like $36/quart. i've never tried fig syrup but find it an intriguing concept.... though i'm more likely to give it a whirl if they package it in pints. does anyone remember how much it used to be and if they did pints? (all their other housemade canned products come in pints) .justjoan

    Last year it was about $16/pint (and was sold exclusively in pint-sized jars).
  • Post #30 - October 11th, 2009, 9:39 pm
    Post #30 - October 11th, 2009, 9:39 pm Post #30 - October 11th, 2009, 9:39 pm
    Last year it was about $16/pint (and was sold exclusively in pint-sized jars).


    thanks matt. if you bought it, what did you eat it on? i know imported bottles are available online, but i think i'll wait and hope for bari's version sometime in the near future. justjoan

    edited to say: i just read earlier posts in this thread and saw suggestions on what to drizzle it on, so no need to add anything.

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