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Hot Doug's--I'm A Believer!

Hot Doug's--I'm A Believer!
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  • Post #91 - February 21st, 2006, 9:30 pm
    Post #91 - February 21st, 2006, 9:30 pm Post #91 - February 21st, 2006, 9:30 pm
    Hot Doug says he updates the daily specials on his website every day by 7am, so while you can't plan too far ahead, you can at least know by the wee hours of the morning what the special dogs are for the day. I, too, am on the lookout for the Tueben...
    Anthony Bourdain on Barack Obama: "He's from Chicago, so he knows what good food is."
  • Post #92 - February 21st, 2006, 10:36 pm
    Post #92 - February 21st, 2006, 10:36 pm Post #92 - February 21st, 2006, 10:36 pm
    geli wrote:Hot Doug says he updates the daily specials on his website every day by 7am, so while you can't plan too far ahead, you can at least know by the wee hours of the morning what the special dogs are for the day. I, too, am on the lookout for the Tueben...


    Hmm. I think I may have been mistaken saying the foie-duck is available all week. Perhaps his "other specials" change from day to day while the "game of the week" remains? I thought all specials remained constant throughout the week but realize now this is probably wrong.

    So than, if we are in the hunt for the elusive Tueben, we need to check every AM?

    gleam:
    My sausage was warm, and while I may have liked it hotter, it would have melted all the toppings into a mess. I only go on off hours (no time between 11:30-1:30, forget Saturdays). My sandwich was excellently constructed and held up to the vigors of eating while driving (including expressway) to finish at home.

    -ramon
  • Post #93 - February 22nd, 2006, 12:32 am
    Post #93 - February 22nd, 2006, 12:32 am Post #93 - February 22nd, 2006, 12:32 am
    Yeah, I only go on off-hours, too. The wait is a drag. The first time I had the duck sausage it was perfect. The foie "butter" was melty and rich and exactly as it should be. The "butter", this last time, though, was the problem (not the sausage itself).

    The specials run until he's sold out of the product, as far as I know. They'll often disappear in the middle of the day, and just because something is on the website before you head out the door doesn't mean he still has it when you get there.

    I've seen all but two of the specials sold out before, I think shortly after he reopened.
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #94 - February 22nd, 2006, 4:53 pm
    Post #94 - February 22nd, 2006, 4:53 pm Post #94 - February 22nd, 2006, 4:53 pm
    The Tueben was there the first week of February. I went twice, and it was just as good as the first time.

    I had the Foie and Duck Sausage a month ago or so, and while I think it was probably really good, I also think I'm not a huge fan of foie and duck. One of my dining companions, however, was in love with it.
  • Post #95 - February 23rd, 2006, 12:05 am
    Post #95 - February 23rd, 2006, 12:05 am Post #95 - February 23rd, 2006, 12:05 am
    As much as I love the specials, it's becoming difficult to justify the price difference compared to a regular menu item.
    My standbye has been the thuringer - which is about $3.00. As fun as it is to experiment with all the exotic specials (alligator, rattlesnake, etc.) I'm not convinced they are worth an extra $4.00 or more.
    Besides, it's a hot dog. They all kind of taste the same.
  • Post #96 - February 25th, 2006, 8:00 pm
    Post #96 - February 25th, 2006, 8:00 pm Post #96 - February 25th, 2006, 8:00 pm
    'Just went to the website - please note Hot Doug's is closed from 2/27 - 3/11, and reopening for business 3/13.
  • Post #97 - February 26th, 2006, 6:17 pm
    Post #97 - February 26th, 2006, 6:17 pm Post #97 - February 26th, 2006, 6:17 pm
    AARRRGGG.... I'm in town 3/4 to 3/6. Figgures... Well it's not that bad Doug will be open when I move back full time this spring.
  • Post #98 - April 12th, 2006, 11:08 am
    Post #98 - April 12th, 2006, 11:08 am Post #98 - April 12th, 2006, 11:08 am
    It must be spring. As I was walking into Hot Doug's a guy came out with his paper bag, and stepped onto his upright industrial-size riding lawn mower to drive off.
    Watch Sky Full of Bacon, the Chicago food HD podcast!
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  • Post #99 - April 12th, 2006, 11:22 am
    Post #99 - April 12th, 2006, 11:22 am Post #99 - April 12th, 2006, 11:22 am
    Mike G wrote:It must be spring. As I was walking into Hot Doug's a guy came out with his paper bag, and stepped onto his upright industrial-size riding lawn mower to drive off.


    Could it have been George Jones?
  • Post #100 - May 18th, 2006, 2:53 pm
    Post #100 - May 18th, 2006, 2:53 pm Post #100 - May 18th, 2006, 2:53 pm
    Attention:

    According to the website, the Tueben has returned for this week.

    Run, don't walk...

    http://www.hotdougs.com/specials.htm
  • Post #101 - May 18th, 2006, 2:55 pm
    Post #101 - May 18th, 2006, 2:55 pm Post #101 - May 18th, 2006, 2:55 pm
    I gotta say, I tried it and it was one of the few outright failures in the Doug arsenal.
    Watch Sky Full of Bacon, the Chicago food HD podcast!
    New episode: Soil, Corn, Cows and Cheese
    Watch the Reader's James Beard Award-winning Key Ingredient here.
  • Post #102 - May 18th, 2006, 3:00 pm
    Post #102 - May 18th, 2006, 3:00 pm Post #102 - May 18th, 2006, 3:00 pm
    LTH,

    Anyone know is Hot Doug has the foie gras dog back? I was there, maybe, 10-days ago and they were out. Doug said it'd be at least a week until they were restocked.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #103 - May 18th, 2006, 3:35 pm
    Post #103 - May 18th, 2006, 3:35 pm Post #103 - May 18th, 2006, 3:35 pm
    I had the Joe Moore last week - it was delish.

    His site is usually up to date, last I checked he had a Duck and Jalapeno sausage topped with "Foie Butter" - little cold slices of Foie Gras.

    My guess is he got it in and ran out....
  • Post #104 - May 18th, 2006, 3:41 pm
    Post #104 - May 18th, 2006, 3:41 pm Post #104 - May 18th, 2006, 3:41 pm
    kafein wrote:My guess is he got it in and ran out....

    Kafein,

    Exactly, Hot Doug had the foie gras dog, but on the 5th, when I was last there, they had run out.

    I'd love to taste one before it was criminalized.

    Enjoy,
    Gary
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #105 - May 19th, 2006, 9:00 am
    Post #105 - May 19th, 2006, 9:00 am Post #105 - May 19th, 2006, 9:00 am
    Gary,

    I enjoyed the Foie-goodness on the morning of the 13th. Not only that, but the Teuben was on the specials board, as well (as it appears to still be). It is a strange day indeed when I have no urge to order duck fries. Joe Moore, Teuben, and my standard Madonna/Raquel/Ann-Margret were more than enough.
  • Post #106 - May 19th, 2006, 3:26 pm
    Post #106 - May 19th, 2006, 3:26 pm Post #106 - May 19th, 2006, 3:26 pm
    Was at Doug's a few hours ago. The Toubin is indeed in the house and in my belly... MMmmm. They had the Jalapeno/Bacon/Duck/ Foie Gras sausage in stock as of 1:30. As I was alone, I hugely enjoyed everyone around me ohhing at the Foie then the smattering of curses when one of thier dining companions would mention that their delicious meal was now an illicit pleasure.
  • Post #107 - June 5th, 2006, 1:58 pm
    Post #107 - June 5th, 2006, 1:58 pm Post #107 - June 5th, 2006, 1:58 pm
    Stopped by Hot Doug's today for lunch and had the Foie Gras and Sauternes Duck Sausage with Truffle Sauce Moutarde and Goat Cheese.

    While it was very good, IMHO it was blown completely out of the water by Today's Celebrity Sausage - The Michelle Alfano (Shrimp and Pork Smoked Sausage with Spicy Remoulade and Gorgonzola Dolce). I would never have expected a mixture of seafood and pork to work so well in a sausage, but I was very impressed with this one. Thumb's up for sure.
    I exist in Chicago, but I live in New Orleans.
  • Post #108 - June 5th, 2006, 2:43 pm
    Post #108 - June 5th, 2006, 2:43 pm Post #108 - June 5th, 2006, 2:43 pm
    They work well together in egg rolls; why not in a sausage?

    Buddy
  • Post #109 - June 5th, 2006, 2:55 pm
    Post #109 - June 5th, 2006, 2:55 pm Post #109 - June 5th, 2006, 2:55 pm
    BuddyRoadhouse wrote:They work well together in egg rolls; why not in a sausage?

    Buddy


    Buddy,

    I'm not sure from the wording whether ChiNOLA was remarking on the combination in general or rather specifically the combination turning up in sausage form but, indeed, the combination of shrimp (and other frutti di mare / mariscos) and pork is a classic one in a number of cuisines, though it does seem underappreciated in others. In Iberia (Portugal and all the various major constituents of Spain), insular Italy and to a lesser degree in southern Italy seafood and pork combos are found in a number of traditional dishes -- though to my knowledge not in one and the same tubular product. I'd like to try the one ChiNOLA mentions.

    Antonius

    Antonius
    Alle Nerven exzitiert von dem gewürzten Wein -- Anwandlung von Todesahndungen -- Doppeltgänger --
    - aus dem Tagebuch E.T.A. Hoffmanns, 6. Januar 1804.
    ________
    Na sir is na seachain an cath.
  • Post #110 - June 5th, 2006, 2:57 pm
    Post #110 - June 5th, 2006, 2:57 pm Post #110 - June 5th, 2006, 2:57 pm
    BuddyRoadhouse wrote:They work well together in egg rolls; why not in a sausage?


    Good question - I guess whenever I have seeen "seafood sausage" preps thay have been comprised entirely of seafood (not the I eat much, if any "seafood sausage" - I prefer sausages made from pork myself)...
    I exist in Chicago, but I live in New Orleans.
  • Post #111 - June 5th, 2006, 7:11 pm
    Post #111 - June 5th, 2006, 7:11 pm Post #111 - June 5th, 2006, 7:11 pm
    I took my soon-to-be brother-in-law to Hot Dougs last thursday. He had the buffalo chipotle sausage with guinness stout mustard and sharp cheddar. I usually stick with the Thuringer but figured I'd branch out and had the veal sausage with lemon-pepper mustard and shredded ricotta.

    It always makes you feel good to introduce someone to a place that, upon the first bite, makes them smile in awe, and then after I slice off part of my veal and give it to him, he just started laughing. It was so good he couldn't restrain his glee. He eventually went on to call it "an eye-opening experience."

    And the best part was (that I refrained from mentioning) that I don't even think that it was that special - as far as Doug's goes. The buffalo was kinda bland, I thought, and my veal sausage was great but after a while the lemon-pepper mix became a bit too overpowering and I had to wipe a bit of it off in order to get the full sausage taste along side of it. Not that I thought it took away from anything--Doug's is an entity unto itself.

    All in all, I find it very hard to have a bad experience at Hot Doug's.
  • Post #112 - June 5th, 2006, 9:30 pm
    Post #112 - June 5th, 2006, 9:30 pm Post #112 - June 5th, 2006, 9:30 pm
    ChiNOLA wrote:
    BuddyRoadhouse wrote:They work well together in egg rolls; why not in a sausage?


    Good question - I guess whenever I have seeen "seafood sausage" preps thay have been comprised entirely of seafood (not the I eat much, if any "seafood sausage" - I prefer sausages made from pork myself)...
    While I know you are not denegrating "seafood sausage" here, I must tell you about the unbelievably tasty smoked fish sausages sold up in Door County.

    When Mrs. Roadhouse and I spent a long weekend exploring up there a few years back, we discovered this local delilcacy in abundance. Rich, deep, smoky flavors in tube form. The outer casing was golden brown, the inside was slightly off white with a finer than pork sausage texture.

    We picked up a few pounds in a little smokehouse out at the end of a pier somewhere along the north end of the peninsula. Wrapped in newspaper, the enticing smell could not be contained. The soul filling aroma permeated the interior of our car. It was all we could do to keep from ripping open the package and eating all of it before we got it home.

    Too bad you don't see more fish sausage down around these parts.

    Buddy
  • Post #113 - June 5th, 2006, 9:33 pm
    Post #113 - June 5th, 2006, 9:33 pm Post #113 - June 5th, 2006, 9:33 pm
    Antonius wrote:
    BuddyRoadhouse wrote:They work well together in egg rolls; why not in a sausage?

    Buddy


    Buddy,

    I'm not sure from the wording whether ChiNOLA was remarking on the combination in general or rather specifically the combination turning up in sausage form but, indeed, the combination of shrimp (and other frutti di mare / mariscos) and pork is a classic one in a number of cuisines, though it does seem underappreciated in others. In Iberia (Portugal and all the various major constituents of Spain), insular Italy and to a lesser degree in southern Italy seafood and pork combos are found in a number of traditional dishes -- though to my knowledge not in one and the same tubular product. I'd like to try the one ChiNOLA mentions.

    Antonius

    Antonius
    Not to mention Jambalaya! Or how about the Pancit Guisado at the much beloved China Chef in Morton Grove? That shrimp and pork combo shows up more than most people think.

    Buddy
  • Post #114 - October 28th, 2006, 2:26 pm
    Post #114 - October 28th, 2006, 2:26 pm Post #114 - October 28th, 2006, 2:26 pm
    Stopped in to Hot Doug's for an early lunch today. He has his cease and desist letter from the City proudly framed on the counter. The Fwah was, of course, delightful. We also enjoyed the Beef Knockwurst, wrapped in bacon and topped with cheese. (A Francheezie!)

    This was the fattest sausage I have ever seen. And darn, was it tastey.
  • Post #115 - October 28th, 2006, 6:56 pm
    Post #115 - October 28th, 2006, 6:56 pm Post #115 - October 28th, 2006, 6:56 pm
    That's classic - can someone take a pic of the notice and post it?
  • Post #116 - November 1st, 2006, 8:36 pm
    Post #116 - November 1st, 2006, 8:36 pm Post #116 - November 1st, 2006, 8:36 pm
    Stopped in with the hopes of getting some outlaw-laden sassage, only to find that they weren't on the menu that week. Guess I should have checked the website.

    Settled for a beef knockwurst with deli mustard and a "cheese medley" which wasn't anything spectacular, but it's the little things that count: it came with two halloween cookies, gratis.

    It's just so nice to have those unexpected surprises. The random running into of friends in search of a quality encased meats makes it better.
    Writing about craft beer at GuysDrinkingBeer.com
    "You don't realize it, but we're at dinner right now." ~Ebert
  • Post #117 - November 2nd, 2006, 1:24 am
    Post #117 - November 2nd, 2006, 1:24 am Post #117 - November 2nd, 2006, 1:24 am
    you obviously missed the uncured Kielbasa - todays winner, over the elk and the steak...I ran into Mike G there today too, I wonder if he got that one too..

    Erik.
  • Post #118 - November 2nd, 2006, 7:03 am
    Post #118 - November 2nd, 2006, 7:03 am Post #118 - November 2nd, 2006, 7:03 am
    I followed your recommendation for the kielbasa, of course!
    Watch Sky Full of Bacon, the Chicago food HD podcast!
    New episode: Soil, Corn, Cows and Cheese
    Watch the Reader's James Beard Award-winning Key Ingredient here.
  • Post #119 - November 2nd, 2006, 9:38 am
    Post #119 - November 2nd, 2006, 9:38 am Post #119 - November 2nd, 2006, 9:38 am
    Uncured "fresh" kielbasa is one of the greatest sausages around. I wish more places in Chicagoland sold it along with the standard smoked Maxwell Street style sandwich.

    The best place to get it to cook yourself is at Central Homemade Sausage,
    3246 North Central Avenue, Chicago IL 60634.
  • Post #120 - November 2nd, 2006, 9:55 am
    Post #120 - November 2nd, 2006, 9:55 am Post #120 - November 2nd, 2006, 9:55 am
    chainey wrote:Uncured "fresh" kielbasa is one of the greatest sausages around. I wish more places in Chicagoland sold it along with the standard smoked Maxwell Street style sandwich.


    I agree with the first part. On the other hand, fresh kielbasa is very likely more widely available here than anywhere outside of Poland. (Similar could be said for most sausages, of course.)

    I've never been to a wedding or funeral that involved folks from Berwyn, Burbank, Cicero etc. (quite a few) that didn't feature fresh kielbasa (and pierogi and trays of Italian beef). I do wish you saw the stuff at fast food places. It would be a nice addition to hot dogs and smoked Polish. Of course, it doesn't keep as well. On the other hand, it lasts as long as fresh Italian, which is common enough.

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