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Sweets and Savories?

Sweets and Savories?
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  • Sweets and Savories?

    Post #1 - June 6th, 2004, 4:13 pm
    Post #1 - June 6th, 2004, 4:13 pm Post #1 - June 6th, 2004, 4:13 pm
    At the Printer's Row bookfair today, I poked my head into the "Good Eating" tent just long enough to win a $50 gift certificate to Sweets and Savories as a reward for answering a food trivia question. (Q: What's the domestic name for 'arugula'? Answer: Rocket (although, i've never heard Rocket used in the US, i though that was the english and occasionally italian word for that green)).

    So, has anyone been there? Heard anything good? Have any specific recommendations? I saw in a metromix review that they have a kobe burger with foie gras -- does grinding Kobe beef make a better burger?
  • Post #2 - June 6th, 2004, 11:04 pm
    Post #2 - June 6th, 2004, 11:04 pm Post #2 - June 6th, 2004, 11:04 pm
    Congratulations on your certificate for Sweets and Savories. We just ate there Wednesday. The chef and owner Dave Richards, used to be chef at Chef's Station in Evanston, where we really enjoyed his cooking, so we were happy to see him with a new restaurant in Chicago. For $50 per person, the restaurant offers a tasting menu, which I would definitely advise. Since they don't yet have a liquour licence, you should remember to bring your own wine. At our meal, we were served:
    1) asparagus with goat cheese
    2) tomato basil bread soup -- fantastic!
    3) strawberry saffron risotto (sounds wierd but not too sweet)
    4) salmon with a beef spare rib puree sauce -- again, a very unusual mixture, but I liked the combination of tastes)
    5) beef tenderloin with truffled mashed potatoes
    6) fennel salad with duck confit
    7) passion fruit sorbet
    8) lemon curd tart
    9) flourless belgian chocolate cake with dark chocolate ice cream
    10) an assortment of truffles -- many flavored with herbs and spices, such as sage, ginger, or curry
    Portions are moderate, but by the end of the meal, you should be relatively full.
    If you are having trouble deciding what to order, this should solve your problem ...
    Don't hesitate to say that we recommended the restaurant and the tasting menu, as wel are old customers
    Robert and Catherine Launay (alias the French couple)
  • Post #3 - June 7th, 2004, 9:43 am
    Post #3 - June 7th, 2004, 9:43 am Post #3 - June 7th, 2004, 9:43 am
    Thank you!
  • Post #4 - June 10th, 2004, 1:58 pm
    Post #4 - June 10th, 2004, 1:58 pm Post #4 - June 10th, 2004, 1:58 pm
    i'm glad robert and catherine had a good meal. the $50 tasting menu sounds like the only l bargain you're going to find there. i had been interested in going until i saw the menu. its insanely overpriced, not just for that block of fullerton, but for anywhere. there is a $16 salad of fennel. and a $14 salad of asparagus. a slice of devils food cake(plus ice cream) is $8. and the pork tenderloin entree (one of the least expensive, but delicious, cuts of meat) is either $28 or $32!(i forget, i was so incensed when i saw the menu). good luck.......... joan
  • Post #5 - August 8th, 2004, 1:11 am
    Post #5 - August 8th, 2004, 1:11 am Post #5 - August 8th, 2004, 1:11 am
    So I've been to Sweets and Savories twice -- first popped in because they have (had?) a deal with Facets: free cappuccino with a dessert if you have a Facets ticket stub, and I figured they were some coffee shop.

    I was also struck by the prices, but there are some deals: my first visit was brunch, which was quite good (Duck Confit, I think) and generous: included scone (delicious and creamy) and tasty bread, large portion of entree, and truffles to end. I'd suggest the brunch and plan to be back.
    [The goofy flavored truffles recall Vosges, but Vosges does a great job (and they're proper truffles, not just balls o' chocolate) and Sweet and Savories doesn't: the flavors didn't work for me.]

    My second visit (today -- er, yesterday) didn't go so well. They have dessert tasting menus (current prices: 3 courses for $17, 5 courses for $22), which sounded good and a nice deal (I'd had a good experience with Tru's dessert menu for $25, and figured this was largely similar). I started with some light food: a tart with champagne grapes, sour cream and chives (and a tasty sauce) -- pretty tasty and quirky; and then the tomato bread soup (with nice olive oil and basil), which was also quite good.

    The desserts didn't go so well: the 5 courses means 5 full-size desserts, so if you have a bottomless stomach or split it, it probably works okay, but it was too much for me; this wasn't the main problem though. Firstly, most of the desserts were boring: a raspberry sorbet, Yet Another creme brule, a beautifully made but boring bread pudding (you get better at Trotter's to go or the Co-op; nice vanilla sauce though), and chocolate fondant cake/ice cream (again, beautifully made, but I was full; kinda boring flavor, but very cocoa-y ice cream). Secondly, I was rushed through my meal, and thus got really (uncomfortably) stuffed: I was hardly finished when another dish came out (and in two cases I wasn't finished!). I don't think this was intentional, as the place was pretty empty (2 other tables), though maybe they expected a crowd later -- I'll chalk it up to incompetence over malice.

    The lemon curd tart, however, was fabulous (with an indulgent blueberry compote and dollop of cream) -- I'd highly recommend it.

    Overall, I rather enjoyed the savories and plan to try more (especially at brunch), but was largely disappointed by the sweets; the 5-course dessert might be a cheap date though (if you can split it). You might also need to slow down the waiter (mine was Sean; maybe he's new and clueless, but something to watch for).

    Lastly, the ambience is a bit weird: it's a sedate white table-cloth place (with quality utensils and chairs), but the room's pretty crowded and barren, you're almost in the kitchen (and you have a nice view of the coffee-maker), and the waiters wear jeans (also the bathrooms are pretty cheap) -- plus it's on a pretty downscale stretch of Fullerton. Some of the food's quite tasty, but I wonder what kinda crowd they're trying to attract -- I can't imagine taking someone there to impress, and at these prices I'm not sure what they're driving at; there's enough quality new american joints in town (blackbird comes to mind) and this isn't even in the same league (except price-wise).

    Oh, and the ice tea was pretty bad (to my taste): okay tea, but not suited for icing.
  • Post #6 - August 16th, 2005, 11:00 am
    Post #6 - August 16th, 2005, 11:00 am Post #6 - August 16th, 2005, 11:00 am
    Does anyone know if they have a website, and if so, what the address is? I've tried searching, googling, etc. but with no luck...
  • Post #7 - August 17th, 2005, 11:09 am
    Post #7 - August 17th, 2005, 11:09 am Post #7 - August 17th, 2005, 11:09 am
    Ms.Paris wrote:Does anyone know if they have a website, and if so, what the address is? I've tried searching, googling, etc. but with no luck...

    Sweets & Savories
    1534 W. Fullerton Ave.
    Chicago, IL 60614
    773 281 6778

    No website, but they have their liquor license now.
    Sadly, they do not have anymore lunch service.
    But they have afternoon tea, by reservation only.
  • Post #8 - August 17th, 2005, 12:07 pm
    Post #8 - August 17th, 2005, 12:07 pm Post #8 - August 17th, 2005, 12:07 pm
    Seth Zurer wrote:So, has anyone been there? Heard anything good? Have any specific recommendations? I saw in a metromix review that they have a kobe burger with foie gras -- does grinding Kobe beef make a better burger?

    Not necessarily, but the additional items sure make for a great, and inexpensive, burger.

    They offer a Kobe beef hamburger with Normandy goose foie gras and truffle mayonnaise, on a toasted brioche roll ($17), and french frites fried in duck fat and served with Mission fig ketchup ($6).

    The Kobe beef was at least a 1/2 a pound and about 4 inches in diameter and 3/4 inch thick (just a guess as I forgot to bring my tape measure), cooked to your liking, medium rare for me. It was topped with the foie gras pate, same size in diameter and an 3/16th of an inch thick. The buns were huge and tasty, especially with the pungent truffle mayonnaise. This was hands down, the best Kobe beef burger (or burger in general) that I, or my friends, ever had. Better than the Kobe beef burger at Yoshi's on Halsted, and just as good, if not better than the infamous DB Burger (ground prime rib, leavened with braised short ribs, truffles, foie gras, and a hint of vegetable root) to be found in New York at DB Bistro Moderne. The amazing thing about this place is the price. Its really affordable. The burger at Sweets and Savories costs $17, whereas the burger at Yoshi's runs for $21 and the DB Burger is $27. This leaves you more cash for dessert, if you have room in your belly. And ohh the desserts.

    Image Plan.

    Image Elevation.
    Last edited by yellow truffle on August 17th, 2005, 6:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #9 - August 17th, 2005, 12:46 pm
    Post #9 - August 17th, 2005, 12:46 pm Post #9 - August 17th, 2005, 12:46 pm
    I guess inexpensive is very much a matter of opinion :)
    Ed Fisher
    my chicago food photos

    RIP LTH.
  • Post #10 - August 20th, 2005, 8:07 am
    Post #10 - August 20th, 2005, 8:07 am Post #10 - August 20th, 2005, 8:07 am
    After reading great reviews about it here and on the other board, J. & I went to S&S last night and couldn't have had a better experience. The food, the service, the decor, the music ~ all were perfect. At the end of the night, our only question was -- why isn't this place packed?? Why aren't there lines out the door? No wait. That was the second question. The first was: when can we come back?

    The restaurant itself is very small, almost completely nondescript from the street, on a clogged section of Fullerton, just before Ashland. It seats about 50. The decor is French bistro-style, the music French or at least Francophone.

    Though we knew they had recently gotten their liquor license, we also knew that their corkage fee remains very reasonable ($10). When we arrived they gave us the wine list ~ a very nice, if small, list with many reasonably priceed bottles. They seemed slightly put out that we'd brought our own. Understandable, I think, but once they saw what we brought (no Yellow Tail here!) it seemed ok. We sent back tastes to the kithen & staff from each bottle.

    Our service was impeccable: friendly, enthusiastic, helpful.

    Onto the food... we both got the tasting menu. Seven courses, $50. Except that we ended up getting 10 courses (11 if you count the chocolate truffles at the end). It was, in a word, divine.

    My descriptions don't nearly do justice to the meal - we had no menu, nor did I take notes so I am certainly missing some important components in these dishes, but I've at least captured their essence ~

    1) Chilled potato & leek soup with grapes.
    2) Mussels in a tomato & lobster broth
    3) snapper on a bed of herbed polenta
    4) beef with duck-fat fries
    5) duck confit risotto with blueberries, creme fraiche and white truffle oil
    6) cheese (wish I could remember what kind) in a bed of lavendar honey, with fresh figs and freshly shaved truffles
    7) arugula salad with parmesan-like cheese and lemon
    8) blackberry-cabernet sorbet
    9) lemon curd tart with blueberries and cream
    10) molten chocolate cake
    11) lavendar-chocolate truffles

    While I don't have the time now to go into detail about each dish, let me just say that in every way, the food here exceeded my already high expectations. The snapper and beef were definitely standouts, but it would be unfair to say that any one dish was better than another -- they were all delicious.

    The portions were small but by no means tiny. J. somehow managed to clean his plate with every course; besides the mussels, there was no course that I could finish entirely. The staff was eager to box up leftovers, meaning I have a second delicious lunch/dinner waiting for me today.

    Overall, transcendant food (you should have seen the look on J.'s face as he savored the cheese-truffle-honey-fig combination), excellent service and extremely reasonable prices made our experience at Sweets & Savories truly memorable.

    This has to be the best deal in Chicago, hands down.
  • Post #11 - November 23rd, 2005, 5:34 pm
    Post #11 - November 23rd, 2005, 5:34 pm Post #11 - November 23rd, 2005, 5:34 pm
    Are they still allowing BYOB? If so, what's the corkage? How is the wine list pricing now?

    thanks!
    Leek

    SAVING ONE DOG may not change the world,
    but it CHANGES THE WORLD for that one dog.
    American Brittany Rescue always needs foster homes. Please think about helping that one dog. http://www.americanbrittanyrescue.org
  • Post #12 - November 23rd, 2005, 6:05 pm
    Post #12 - November 23rd, 2005, 6:05 pm Post #12 - November 23rd, 2005, 6:05 pm
    The last time I was there corkage was $10. The wine list was small but well thought out and reasonable... I brought my wine so I don't remember specifics,b ut it seemed that much of the list was in the $30-40 range.
  • Post #13 - November 23rd, 2005, 7:11 pm
    Post #13 - November 23rd, 2005, 7:11 pm Post #13 - November 23rd, 2005, 7:11 pm
    Thanks so much, we are going there tonight for the Burger special :) :)

    It's only a mile away (though it is a REALLY icky walk between us and them, as we either have to walk on the part of Webster without sidewalks or through the Damen/Fullerton intersection) This may become a Wednesday regular....
    Leek

    SAVING ONE DOG may not change the world,
    but it CHANGES THE WORLD for that one dog.
    American Brittany Rescue always needs foster homes. Please think about helping that one dog. http://www.americanbrittanyrescue.org
  • Post #14 - November 23rd, 2005, 10:07 pm
    Post #14 - November 23rd, 2005, 10:07 pm Post #14 - November 23rd, 2005, 10:07 pm
    They ran out of burgers, so we didn't get any. We weren't up for the tasting menu. Sigh.
    Leek

    SAVING ONE DOG may not change the world,
    but it CHANGES THE WORLD for that one dog.
    American Brittany Rescue always needs foster homes. Please think about helping that one dog. http://www.americanbrittanyrescue.org
  • Post #15 - November 28th, 2005, 10:21 am
    Post #15 - November 28th, 2005, 10:21 am Post #15 - November 28th, 2005, 10:21 am
    Hey all,

    I just wanted to let all of the Sweets and Savories fans out there know that I've nominated S&S as a Great Neighborhood Restaurant. If you'd like to voice your support, please post here:

    http://www.lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.php?t=6047

    Thanks,
    Josh
  • Post #16 - December 5th, 2005, 11:15 am
    Post #16 - December 5th, 2005, 11:15 am Post #16 - December 5th, 2005, 11:15 am
    Took a friend to Sweets and Savories last night for a birthday celebration. He had never been before so I was interested in converting one more to a True Believer.

    They are still offering white truffles as a supplement to the regular tasting menu. My friend works at Coco Pazzo and has consumed his fair share of white truffles this season so we were sort of on the fence about the add-on. In the end, though, we decided we couldn't pass up the opportunity. In contrast to my last truffle tasting menu at S&S, this one had truffle shavings on only 2 or 3 courses, with the supplement adjusted down to $70 per person, still a great deal IMHO.

    We started with seared foie gras served with a poached apricot and some other elements that added notes of cinnamon to the dish. This was a great "winter preparation" of foie and was a nice start to the meal.

    Next we moved on to a 5-mushroom soup with some sort of oil drizzled over it at the table. I'm not really a mushroom fan, but the soup was very satisfying on a cold night like last night.

    The first seafood course was a single scallop, topped with black truffle relish in a perigord sauce. I think David puts crack in his perigord sauce because I can never get enough of it, no matter what dish it is served with. This course also came with shaved white truffles. The scallop was perfectly cooked and all elements of the dish worked nicely with each other.

    Seafood course number two was a roasted tile fish served on lobster hash with a black truffle butter and truffle oil. I've had this dish once before with sturgeon instead of tile fish, but it was just as good this time around. Lobster, truffle butter, what could be bad.

    Next we moved on to the foie gras risotto, one of my favorite S&S dishes. Perfectly creamy risotto with bits of foie gras cooked into it, topped with shaved white truffles. Total decadence.

    The meat course was braised short ribs with brussle sprouts and potatoes. This was served with two types of sauces, one slightly creamy and the other a darker sauce which incorporated Seville oranges. I wish I could give more details on this dish but we were well into the wine at this point and I was getting a bit loopy. I do know that I liked it, even though I was starting to get pretty full at this point.

    Next was a very simple and refreshing salad, followed by 2 desserts. This first was key lime pie and the second was a chocolate fondant with chocolate gelatto. A perfect finish to a great meal.
  • Post #17 - May 1st, 2006, 8:15 am
    Post #17 - May 1st, 2006, 8:15 am Post #17 - May 1st, 2006, 8:15 am
    Long time lurker...

    I'm interested in the Mother's Day brunch offerings at Sweets and Savories ("a special brunch menu includes pastries, a choice of cocktail, an appetizer, entree and coffee or tea. A la carte desserts also available"--from Metromix), and I was wondering if it's an acceptable restaurant for kids--specifically two boys, ages 5 and 6 (who are both good eaters).

    Thanks in advance!

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