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Roti Kaeng Karii Neua at TAC [Pics]

Roti Kaeng Karii Neua at TAC [Pics]
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  • Roti Kaeng Karii Neua at TAC [Pics]

    Post #1 - January 23rd, 2005, 6:11 pm
    Post #1 - January 23rd, 2005, 6:11 pm Post #1 - January 23rd, 2005, 6:11 pm
    As of yesterday, Andy has roti kaeng kàrìi néau on special. As you may already know, roti is a round griddled wheat bread that is a close relation to the Indian paratha. In Thailand, it is most commonly found in the south, where it is often eaten for breakfast with rich and savoury curries like kaeng mátsàman or kaeng kàrìi. At TAC, Andy has paired a few rounds of this bread with an aromatic and rich beef curry. The combination of tender beef shank, potatoes, carrots and onions might nearly suggest something that your grandmother would make, should your grandmother happen to be Thai.

    Image

    Image

    I am personally very excited about this dish because it showcases the Malay Muslim-style curry powder for beef, or phõng kàrìi sãmràp néua, that I made at the end of last year. As with a number of other southern Thai curries, the flavour takes alot of its character from the fragrance of the roasted and ground dried spices.

    If you happen to visit TAC at some point in the near future, I hope that you will give this dish consideration. I should warn you that it packs a bit of heat, though. And, while this sort of thing might typically be taken by itself, you may want to consider the yam krà-phao plaa ("fish maw salad") or the khaw mũu yâang ("grilled pork neck") to start off. Laying down a base of sugar and fresh chile heat on the palate helps to smooth out the edges and corners of the curry's profile.

    "That sounds like a load of hooey," you might say? Just try it.

    Oh, and don't be afraid to get your hands dirty.

    Regards,
    Erik M.

    Edited to redress the injuries which resulted from The Move. :wink:
    Last edited by Erik M. on July 25th, 2005, 8:51 am, edited 3 times in total.
  • Post #2 - January 23rd, 2005, 8:41 pm
    Post #2 - January 23rd, 2005, 8:41 pm Post #2 - January 23rd, 2005, 8:41 pm
    Hi,

    This is quite exciting to find a place serving roti and curry, which is a popular breakfast option discussed previously here and here.

    Though admittedly I am into DIY roti and curry tomorrow: I bought frozen roti/parantha on Devon and I'm making Chicken curry this evening. Until I find time to get to TAC, this will have to do.

    Thanks again for the heads up.

    Regards,
    Cathy2

    "You'll be remembered long after you're dead if you make good gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits." -- Nathalie Dupree
    Facebook, Twitter, Greater Midwest Foodways, Road Food 2012: Podcast
  • Post #3 - January 26th, 2005, 9:56 pm
    Post #3 - January 26th, 2005, 9:56 pm Post #3 - January 26th, 2005, 9:56 pm
    The roti kaeng kàrìi néau was excellent -- beyond even what I had hoped -- as was the wild boar pad ped my friend had. Both were perfect for a snowy Chicago night.

    A note about Erik's photos, however: I think they suffer somewhat from foreshortening. Now, I'm not a heavy eater by any means, but I still felt portions were as they should be and perhaps not as small as you'd think from the aforementioned shots (the roti are maybe 5-6" across).

    And the heat? Spicy, yes, but I wouldn't say the dish packs a huge punch. Then again, this coming from someone who didn't think Sizzle India required an "asbestos-lined stomach" (as some have suggested)...
    Last edited by hot tamale on January 27th, 2005, 6:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • Post #4 - January 27th, 2005, 3:44 am
    Post #4 - January 27th, 2005, 3:44 am Post #4 - January 27th, 2005, 3:44 am
    did t a c on saturday in the middle of the blizzard. excellent meal. wild boar, pork neck, larb, gr squid, great dessert of rice with blk beans, banana and cashews steamed in banana leaf. outstanding.
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #5 - January 27th, 2005, 3:29 pm
    Post #5 - January 27th, 2005, 3:29 pm Post #5 - January 27th, 2005, 3:29 pm
    I think Sizzle India used to be spicier. But maybe someone who goes there regularly would know.

    I don't know if Erik did it on purpose, but because the spoon and fork are there it gives you good perspective. From someone who takes *a lot* of food photos, I can attest that Erik is doing some great work.
  • Post #6 - January 27th, 2005, 4:33 pm
    Post #6 - January 27th, 2005, 4:33 pm Post #6 - January 27th, 2005, 4:33 pm
    extramsg wrote:I think Sizzle India used to be spicier. But maybe someone who goes there regularly would know.

    I don't know if Erik did it on purpose, but because the spoon and fork are there it gives you good perspective. From someone who takes *a lot* of food photos, I can attest that Erik is doing some great work.


    Nick, thanks, but I am not sweating the criticism. I tend to discount in great measure the opinions of those who cannot be bothered to spell my name correctly, anyway. :twisted:

    As for the heat-level of this dish, I will say this: Andy and I shared the first batch of this curry, and that is what I reported on, above. What has been served subsequently has been greatly restrained, heat-wise, as Andy decided that our initial sample was too hot for the vast majority of his patrons.

    At any rate, I do not think that this particular dish benefits from significant heat. If hot tamale is interested in charting different territory, though, s/he can rest assured that Andy will be willing to accomodate. Or perhaps s/he could try kũay kũay j?p. That is a dish that packs heat and is very well-served doing so. And it certainly qualifies as "different territory" for almost anyone, here.

    Regards,
    Erik M.
  • Post #7 - January 27th, 2005, 4:59 pm
    Post #7 - January 27th, 2005, 4:59 pm Post #7 - January 27th, 2005, 4:59 pm
    I was thinking about curry heat today. How do they restrain the heat? Whenever I make curries at home I can't restrain the heat well enough for my wife unless I dump a ton of sugar in or (coconut) water it down. If places were largely making their own pastes, they could just leave most of the chiles out and have a separate chile paste that they add. Or they could use mild chiles, even if the flavor profile would be a little different. But most places are just using Mae Ploy like me.
  • Post #8 - January 27th, 2005, 6:31 pm
    Post #8 - January 27th, 2005, 6:31 pm Post #8 - January 27th, 2005, 6:31 pm
    Oh, it wasn't a criticism at all -- hope it didn't come off that way...

    When my roti arrived, I was just pleasantly surprised by its size (was expecting smaller portions from the photos though, in the end, I probably take the blame for my assumption...). If anything, I'd rather have something exceed my expectations -- which TAC did, with flying colors.

    And, the dish wasn't NOT spicy. When we sat down, the couple next to us was hooing and hawing about how spicy their food was (not the roti, btw.) I believe the exact words were: "Oh, I didn't know Thai food was so spicy." Nevertheless, they appeared to be enjoying themselves.

    Things just can't ever be TOO spicy, if you ask me. And, btw, the s/he is a he :)
  • Post #9 - January 27th, 2005, 7:34 pm
    Post #9 - January 27th, 2005, 7:34 pm Post #9 - January 27th, 2005, 7:34 pm
    hot tamale wrote:Oh, it wasn't a criticism at all -- hope it didn't come off that way...


    It didn't. ;)

    hot tamale wrote:And, the dish wasn't NOT spicy. When we sat down, the couple next to us was hooing and hawing about how spicy their food was (not the roti, btw.) I believe the exact words were: "Oh, I didn't know Thai food was so spicy." Nevertheless, they appeared to be enjoying themselves.


    Andy serves his food with a tremendous amount of confidence. When he is making the dishes from the Thai menu or from the specials board--unless he is directed to do otherwise--he makes them to his own taste. This is, in large measure, why his Thai patronage is legion. His Thai patrons are accorded a certain consideration, yes, but they are there moreso because they have profound respect for his palate, or his taste.

    Very early on, I told him that he would be best served to treat his American clientele with similar consideration. And, so far, there has been very little complaint.

    hot tamale wrote:And, btw, the s/he is a he :)


    I know. ;)



    Regards,
    Erik M.
  • Post #10 - January 28th, 2005, 7:46 pm
    Post #10 - January 28th, 2005, 7:46 pm Post #10 - January 28th, 2005, 7:46 pm
    extramsg wrote:I was thinking about curry heat today. How do they restrain the heat? Whenever I make curries at home I can't restrain the heat well enough for my wife unless I dump a ton of sugar in or (coconut) water it down. If places were largely making their own pastes, they could just leave most of the chiles out and have a separate chile paste that they add. Or they could use mild chiles, even if the flavor profile would be a little different. But most places are just using Mae Ploy like me.


    Another and not altogether dissimilar manner of redress is to replace some of the "offending" sauce or liquid, by volume, with additional milk or broth. If you are making a sweet curry sauce and you encounter the same problem--while it is certainly not a traditional solution--you may try replacing some of the sauce, or further thinning the sauce, with coconut water*.

    In the fashioning of the curry paste itself, there are so many different variables that bring to bear on the heat of your resultant paste (and subsequent dish). Suffice it to say that even small things, like the amount of time that spices are roasted, can affect the heat of a paste. Yeah, let's not go there, just yet.

    Regards,
    Erik M.

    *Readily available canned, bottled or frozen.
  • Post #11 - January 30th, 2005, 12:09 am
    Post #11 - January 30th, 2005, 12:09 am Post #11 - January 30th, 2005, 12:09 am
    I had the curry/roti this afternoon and it was delicious. When I ordered, I was warned that it's very spicy, which worried me a little, but it was fine. Just the perfect amount of heat I think.

    Also, I think Erik's photo very accurately shows the size of the dish. It's not a huge amount of curry, but with the roti, it's a filling meal.
  • Post #12 - January 30th, 2005, 2:19 pm
    Post #12 - January 30th, 2005, 2:19 pm Post #12 - January 30th, 2005, 2:19 pm
    Was at TAC Friday night. Had the bbq pork neck, the roti, the Issan sausage, and the tamarind orange curry. Only thing I didn't like that taste of was the tamarind orange curry. Sure it was done great, just not for me. Had thought of getting the Boar curry, next time.

    the bbq pork neck was awesome. Tender tasty!!!!!
  • Post #13 - January 30th, 2005, 4:34 pm
    Post #13 - January 30th, 2005, 4:34 pm Post #13 - January 30th, 2005, 4:34 pm
    I went to TAC Quick for lunch the other day and had the wild boar curry. Great flavor, but the meat was a little too fatty for me (and I'm a guy who loves rib tips, roast duck, and pork rinds). The actual meat portion was good, but a little too much rind for my taste--I guess I only like my chicharron if it's somewhat crisp.

    Girlfriend had what turned out to be a half fried chicken--good, but I guess she was expecting it to be off the bone. Ah well!

    I saw the roti on the board and asked about it, but I somehow didn't glean from the waiter's response (such a nice patient fellow) that it was bread like at an Indian place. I will have to get it next time!

    The fermented sausage appetizer is SO GOOD! Better than the similar thing they have at Sticky Rice.

    So is the Thai menu at Aroy good? I've ordered from their normal menu and wasn't terribly impressed.

    It was pretty funny, a friend who doesn't read this board told me Friday night "We ate at this great thai place the other day!" and it ended up being good ol TAC...
    Aaron
  • Post #14 - January 30th, 2005, 4:48 pm
    Post #14 - January 30th, 2005, 4:48 pm Post #14 - January 30th, 2005, 4:48 pm
    psychchef wrote:Was at TAC Friday night. Had the bbq pork neck, the roti, the Issan sausage, and the tamarind orange curry. Only thing I didn't like that taste of was the tamarind orange curry.


    I am curious. When you say "tamarind orange curry," are you talking about the kaeng mũu tay poh, which is a coconut milk-based curry with pork loin and water spinach, or are you talking about the kaeng s?m cha-om th?wt, which is a stock-based curry with sliced green papaya and an Acacia leaf omelette on top? The former is not on the menu, while the latter is on the Thai menu.

    Regards,
    Erik M.
  • Post #15 - April 30th, 2005, 8:36 pm
    Post #15 - April 30th, 2005, 8:36 pm Post #15 - April 30th, 2005, 8:36 pm
    The roti kaeng karii neua is on the chalkboard at TAC. I was there with a few friends and we had a great meal. I'm not sure if this is still using your curry powder Erik, but if it isn't it still has a depth of flavor that is rich and wonderful, in that comfort-food kinda way. The roti were excellent and made a great complement.

    I also had the nue nam tok for the first time which I look forward to enjoying with a few beers many times in the future.

    I also managed to score the last portion of mango with sticky rice for our table. Another chalkboard item which I'd highly recommend ending your TAC visit with.

    Best,
    Michael / EC
  • Post #16 - April 30th, 2005, 11:30 pm
    Post #16 - April 30th, 2005, 11:30 pm Post #16 - April 30th, 2005, 11:30 pm
    eatchicago wrote:I'm not sure if this is still using your curry powder Erik, but if it isn't it still has a depth of flavor that is rich and wonderful, in that comfort-food kinda way.


    Yep, same stuff.

    The dish sells very well, so it could conceivably be around as long as my patience for making the powder is around. Supply is low right now, though, as I am waiting on ingredients from Thailand.

    In the meantime, I am trying to develop a curry powder and paste for kaeng hangleh. But, the hangleh powder certainly isn't any easier to make than phõng kàrìi sãmràp néua, and the proper preparation and execution of a dish like kaeng hangleh would present a whole new set of logistical issues for a restaurant kitchen like that of TAC.

    Regards,
    Erik M.
  • Post #17 - November 11th, 2006, 10:40 am
    Post #17 - November 11th, 2006, 10:40 am Post #17 - November 11th, 2006, 10:40 am
    After a nearly 2 year hiatus, it's back.

    Get it while this stuff lasts.*

    E.M.

    * I made this batch of curry powder this week, and I have given Andy nearly all it; I am not making any more. Once he runs out, that's it. Il est fini.
  • Post #18 - November 11th, 2006, 11:28 am
    Post #18 - November 11th, 2006, 11:28 am Post #18 - November 11th, 2006, 11:28 am
    Erik,

    I recall once you told me about the complex, arduous process involved in making this powder. Producing this volume is no small feat and can only be described as a labor of love. I have fond memories of the flavor and I look forward to returning to TAC soon for another taste.

    Best,
    Michael
  • Post #19 - November 11th, 2006, 11:42 am
    Post #19 - November 11th, 2006, 11:42 am Post #19 - November 11th, 2006, 11:42 am
    Erik M. wrote:After a nearly 2 year hiatus, it's back.

    LTH,

    Having had the pleasure of both roti kaeng kàrìi néau and Erik, among others, company at lunch yesterday, do not pass go, do not collect $200 go directly to TAC and order roti kaeng kàrìi néau before Erik's curry powder is gone.

    While at TAC I'd also suggest Crispy En Choy, described by YourPalWill here and EatChicago here. Michael (EC) also mentions nam pork ribs*, so aptly outlined, with picture, by Erik M here.

    Enjoy,
    Gary

    *How can you resist something described tasting like "...Issan Sausage 2.0."
    One minute to Wapner.
    Raymond Babbitt

    Low & Slow
  • Post #20 - November 11th, 2006, 11:46 am
    Post #20 - November 11th, 2006, 11:46 am Post #20 - November 11th, 2006, 11:46 am
    eatchicago wrote:Erik,

    I recall once you told me about the complex, arduous process involved in making this powder. Producing this volume is no small feat and can only be described as a labor of love. I have fond memories of the flavor and I look forward to returning to TAC soon for another taste.

    Best,
    Michael


    It took me roughly 15 hours to make the batch pictured (via link) above. I took the original recipe from David Thompson's book, Thai Food, and multiplied it by 15.

    In my opinion, this batch is particularly fine. I was able to find the long pepper required at Whole Foods, and the quality was much, much better than the stuff I had originally been getting from Thailand.*

    E.M.

    * Whole Foods carries Wildcrafted Balinese Long Pepper.
  • Post #21 - November 11th, 2006, 2:41 pm
    Post #21 - November 11th, 2006, 2:41 pm Post #21 - November 11th, 2006, 2:41 pm
    This too is another one of the truly great dishes that Andy serves at TAC. Two years ago, it was my "go to winter comfort food". As Erik aptly noted, what looks like a nice beef stew from Grandma's kitchen is incredibly flavorful and spicy.

    I'm fortunate enought to still have a teaspoon or two of Erik's wonderful curry powder which I dole out in small servings on special occasions like I do my best bottles of scotch. It is truly a wonderful treat.
  • Post #22 - November 11th, 2006, 2:47 pm
    Post #22 - November 11th, 2006, 2:47 pm Post #22 - November 11th, 2006, 2:47 pm
    I too have a small quantity left from the last go around that I keep in the freezer. I add it in small amounts to stews and to a yellow curry I like to make. I will have to hit TAC in the next couple days.

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