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[From Homepage] Eating and The Beautiful Game: Top-Notch U.K.-Style Scarfing for Soccer

[From Homepage] Eating and The Beautiful Game: Top-Notch U.K.-Style Scarfing for Soccer
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  • [From Homepage] Eating and The Beautiful Game: Top-Notch U.K.-Style Scarfing for Soccer

    Post #1 - December 3rd, 2013, 5:46 am
    Post #1 - December 3rd, 2013, 5:46 am Post #1 - December 3rd, 2013, 5:46 am
    This is an excerpt of an article from the homepage. Read Full Article
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    By Kari Lloyd (apopquizkid)
    Image

    It’s often been said that America and the U.K. are two nations divided by a common language. The Brits say “football,” we Americans say “soccer.” We say “tomato,” they say… er… “tomato.” Though a worldwide passion since the Stone Age, U.S. sports fans have only begun to embrace “the beautiful game” called soccer, particularly the teams of the English Premier League.

    The origins of modern-day soccer are said to have sprouted up in England in the 1800s, and the eating traditions surrounding the game are almost as deep and rich as the history of the game itself. While we here in the U.S. tend to stick with our wings and hot dogs no matter what sport we’re viewing, soccer games are a good opportunity to bask in a cultural exchange of sorts.
  • Post #2 - December 3rd, 2013, 11:03 am
    Post #2 - December 3rd, 2013, 11:03 am Post #2 - December 3rd, 2013, 11:03 am
    I do hope there will be a second article giving tips on which special foods are offered at which stadium, and where to go for the best eats along with a good match. I love my EPL and my sports food, and have read a few pieces on stadium food (mostly Asian outside the stadium and in London, IIRC). Have not yet attended an EPL game, though I have been to matches in Spain and Italy (neither with any particularly interesting food offerings), but I plan on doing so sometime soon.

    Thanks for making me hungry and reminding me of a trip that has been simmering in my mind for some time.
    d
    Feeling (south) loopy
  • Post #3 - December 3rd, 2013, 11:19 am
    Post #3 - December 3rd, 2013, 11:19 am Post #3 - December 3rd, 2013, 11:19 am
    I've always wanted to make a trip to England to see a game at a place like Old Trafford or Anfield. Didn't know there would be some interesting chow to explore as well!
  • Post #4 - December 3rd, 2013, 2:03 pm
    Post #4 - December 3rd, 2013, 2:03 pm Post #4 - December 3rd, 2013, 2:03 pm
    I've been to Old Trafford, Stamford Bridge, Craven Cottage, and a few others in England, and at none of them was any of the food inside the stadium edible. Lukewarm pies with unidentifiable fillings, gray, wan attempts at hot dogs, and the like.

    But I think that's because most supporters eat and drink in pubs outside the stadium right up to game time. Our stadia in the U.S. are designed from the beginning to extract as much cash as possible from spectators, which includes far better food choices. But then again, people do not eat at their seats at football matches, and there are no vendors wandering through the aisles during the game.
  • Post #5 - December 3rd, 2013, 2:52 pm
    Post #5 - December 3rd, 2013, 2:52 pm Post #5 - December 3rd, 2013, 2:52 pm
    @chitrader - You absolutely right, and eating outside the stadium is a time-honored tradition. However, some stadiums have decided to kick their food game up a notch by getting popular chefs in as outside consultants. For example Man City's Etihad Stadium launched gourmet pies by Jamie Oliver just this year. Additionally, some of the recently built stadiums like my beloved Arsenal's Emirates Stadium, Chelsea's Stamford Bridge and Bar Carrow Road (Norwich) have put in restaurants the fans can eat at before or after the game.

    @dicksond - LOVE this idea, especially given that in-stadium foods are improving. I will give the wonderful and awesome team at LTHForum the hard sell. *wink*

    @Jonah - Going to a footie match live and in person is an unrivaled experience. I really hope you make it over there!
  • Post #6 - December 3rd, 2013, 9:48 pm
    Post #6 - December 3rd, 2013, 9:48 pm Post #6 - December 3rd, 2013, 9:48 pm
    No prawn sandwiches?
  • Post #7 - December 4th, 2013, 4:52 am
    Post #7 - December 4th, 2013, 4:52 am Post #7 - December 4th, 2013, 4:52 am
    jjjeans wrote:No prawn sandwiches?


    I was waiting for this remark. Cheers. :mrgreen:
  • Post #8 - December 4th, 2013, 2:20 pm
    Post #8 - December 4th, 2013, 2:20 pm Post #8 - December 4th, 2013, 2:20 pm
    You don't go to a football match to eat, you go to a football match to watch football.

    The game's dynamic is totally unlike baseball's.

    However, the atmosphere has changed drastically since the government-mandated gentrification of the old grounds (those that haven't been completely abandoned and destroyed, like Arsenal's legendary Highbury). So yes, up the PSB. Why not?
    fine words butter no parsnips
  • Post #9 - August 28th, 2019, 7:45 am
    Post #9 - August 28th, 2019, 7:45 am Post #9 - August 28th, 2019, 7:45 am
    I've for a long while been itching to make an excursion to England to see a game at a spot like Old Trafford or Anfield. Didn't know there would be some fascinating chow to investigate too!

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