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[From Homepage] Home Cookin' Part 2: Kristina Meyer (trixie-pea)

[From Homepage] Home Cookin' Part 2: Kristina Meyer (trixie-pea)
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  • [From Homepage] Home Cookin' Part 2: Kristina Meyer (trixie-pea)

    Post #1 - December 16th, 2013, 7:09 am
    Post #1 - December 16th, 2013, 7:09 am Post #1 - December 16th, 2013, 7:09 am
    This is an excerpt of an article from the homepage. Read Full Article
    __________________________

    By Alan Lake (jazzfood)
    Image
    Editor's Note: This article is the second in a series by Alan Lake, all about home cooks, their stories and recipes. Read  part one here for a description of what Home Cookin' is all about.

    Alan Lake: Intro

    When I think who in my life best represents the spirit I hope to encapsulate in this series, one name leaps to mind: trixie-pea, a.k.a. Kristina Meyer.

    We’re connected, she and I, and think we both knew it the minute we met. Over the years I’ve been the recipient of numerous trixie-pea throw-downs. Not many people I know can pull off an elaborate Burmese picnic the way she recently did, putting together a spread of nearly a dozen dishes at a remote, outdoor location. And maybe none of those involved could tell how authentic it was, but one thing we did agree upon was just how effing fabulous it all tasted. Like everything she makes.
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #2 - December 16th, 2013, 9:07 am
    Post #2 - December 16th, 2013, 9:07 am Post #2 - December 16th, 2013, 9:07 am
    "What I realized in my attempt to clone this dish was that it wasn’t important to make it taste exactly how Rob remembered it. What made it authentic was the fact that I understood the specialness, the sacredness, of the dish and prepared it with that intention – with respect."

    I'm almost to the point where I don't even mention "authenticity" when talking about food. It's just too slippery a concept. Still, I think maintaining the spirit of a dish is a way to connect with authenticity of some sort.

    Hilarious image of the young Pigmon standing on a chair, scribbling notes on index cards.
    “Nobody exists on purpose. Nobody belongs anywhere. Everybody’s gonna die. Come watch TV?”
  • Post #3 - December 16th, 2013, 9:35 am
    Post #3 - December 16th, 2013, 9:35 am Post #3 - December 16th, 2013, 9:35 am
    Beautiful article! I would like to undertake this gorgeous dish some time, preferably working with someone I love.
  • Post #4 - December 16th, 2013, 10:28 am
    Post #4 - December 16th, 2013, 10:28 am Post #4 - December 16th, 2013, 10:28 am
    What a great article! I'd love to see a picture of the finished dish as served.
    Steve Z.

    “Only the pure in heart can make a good soup.”
    ― Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Post #5 - December 17th, 2013, 3:04 pm
    Post #5 - December 17th, 2013, 3:04 pm Post #5 - December 17th, 2013, 3:04 pm
    Kristina's got "it." (If you have to ask what "it" is, you don't. But Jazzfood lays out the clues for you very nicely.) Lucky Rob!
    Man : I can't understand how a poet like you can eat that stuff.
    T. S. Eliot: Ah, but you're not a poet.
  • Post #6 - December 18th, 2013, 11:58 am
    Post #6 - December 18th, 2013, 11:58 am Post #6 - December 18th, 2013, 11:58 am
    I applaud Mr. Lake for his excellent article and selecting our Kristina and the couscous. Mastering this complex dish,which in our family is virtually ritualistic, is just one manifestation of her many talents. Dr. Lopata (Rob's dad)
  • Post #7 - December 19th, 2013, 8:42 pm
    Post #7 - December 19th, 2013, 8:42 pm Post #7 - December 19th, 2013, 8:42 pm
    The pix of the finished dish is on the intro to the story, and now for your viewing pleasure, right here as well:
    cous-cous-w-boulletes.jpg
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #8 - January 24th, 2014, 11:19 am
    Post #8 - January 24th, 2014, 11:19 am Post #8 - January 24th, 2014, 11:19 am
    Since no one has posted about making this dish, I thought I would report on my experience with the recipe, or properly, a portion of the recipe, adapted to the constraints of my circumstances. I did not have a full day, and my mandoline had been lost in a recent move. I was cooking for two people only, and I had lamb broth on hand, but not chicken broth. I did not attempt the boulettes. So, I think of the product as a sketch, made in preparation for a large canvas, on which I will one day attempt to copy the masterpiece of Meme, Coco, and Kristina. Nevertheless, with some nice short ribs, a delicious dinner was made in a few hours. The spicing was much more aromatic than what I remember from many Parisian iterations of Couscous Royale. Absolutely delicious. The inclusion of squash was new to me, and the sweetness welcome.The chickpeas alone would have made a great dinner over couscous. The butter-massage-plus-oven method for making the couscous was also new to me. it is a method I will use over and over again, since it yielded a texture far superior to what I've accomplished with steaming. The harissa was also more complex than others I have tasted, and the parsley sauce did indeed brighten the whole dish.

    Thank you all, Meme, Coco, Kristina, young Rob and Alan, for sharing this family treasure!
    Man : I can't understand how a poet like you can eat that stuff.
    T. S. Eliot: Ah, but you're not a poet.
  • Post #9 - October 2nd, 2014, 5:47 pm
    Post #9 - October 2nd, 2014, 5:47 pm Post #9 - October 2nd, 2014, 5:47 pm
    One of the reasons I love to create anything, be it food, music or a story, is that it can touch others and effect them. Today I received this via email and can't tell you what a kick it is. I asked her permission to share:

    Hi there! My name is Allison Cardone. I am reaching out to you regarding an article you wrote entitled "Home Cookin", about Tunisian Cous Cous. My Great Grandmother was Meme, whom you mentioned in the article. She was mother to my grandmother Rosette, and her sister CoCo . My grandmother was the woman that fell in love with the GI, my grandfather, Roman Cardone, as mentioned in the article. My grandma Rosette, (Cocos sister, MeMes daughter) also taught MY mom how to make the dish, and she in turn taught me. It is truly a big deal in our family! Coco only passed 2 years ago, and she and I made boulettes together not long before she passed. She had been ill for a very long time, and we were on vacation, spending what would be our last time together, and Coco knew this. So she gave me the official boulette lesson as her sister Rosette, my grandma, had given my mom. It was a day I will cherish forever :) I happened upon you article yesterday by pure chance. My father, Paul Cardone, nephew of CoCo, called me yesterday to plan a visit to Charlotte for his birthday this month. He said " I'm dying for your grandmas Cous Cous" I told him I was too, and my brothers had also just mentioned we were overdue. I am the gourmet cook in our family (toot toot), so I attempted to put a note into my phone that said, " Buy stuff for boulettes and cous cous" But instead it googled my entry, and your article popped up. I was immediately intrigued, as I saw the word Tunesian… & have always searched for similar recipes from my grandmas birthplace of North Africa…so I started reading, and almost fell on the floor when I saw the mention of MeMe and Coco…and then the story of how my grandma fell in love with my grandpa.. a story my dad has shared a million times. Anyway, I wanted to thank you for an awesome article , and let you know the recipe, and the tradition are very much alive in our family. Kristin is the girlfriend of Cocos son, so I have never met her. But MeMe taught both daughters, including Rosette, my grandmother, who then passed it on to my mom, then to me. So awesome! And the recipe in the article is pretty dead on. The pictures were so familiar, like looking at the dish on my mom's table, and now my table as well. Crazy!! Thanks for your time, Allison Cardone
    "In pursuit of joys untasted"
    from Giuseppe Verdi's La Traviata
  • Post #10 - October 3rd, 2014, 8:06 am
    Post #10 - October 3rd, 2014, 8:06 am Post #10 - October 3rd, 2014, 8:06 am
    Jazzfood-

    Allison's email brought a tear to my eye. Thanks to you for opening the door to hear from her.
    -Mary

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